Author Topic: And a partridge in a pear tree  (Read 2600 times)

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blue2000

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Re: And a partridge in a pear tree
« Reply #15 on: December 20, 2010, 01:38:08 PM »
I haven't celebrated Christmas in several years. However, I'm currently staying with my grandmother, who celebrates it herself. Therefore, today I got shanghaied* into doing all the decorating.

I really enjoyed decorating trees as a little girl. In fact, I enjoyed it so much that my mother bought me a miniature tree when I was five, which I decorated for the next eight years. Back then, I was happy with random placement of ornaments. It seems that's no longer the case.

Did you know a person can spend over an hour and a half on a less-than-two-foot tree? I did this afternoon. I wouldn't have if I'd come up with a system beforehand, possibly, but as it stands I kept having to rearrange ornaments because a given area was too wreath-y, or too white and gold, or whatever. My grandmother, sitting on the couch, noted that I moved one ornament (some potpourri gathered in red lace and tied with red and green ribbons with matching rosettes) seven times.

If I had a tree (if I had cats who wouldn't EAT a tree) I would sooo have a system for every ornament. I recall decorating when I was younger, and I had to have similar ornaments exactly the same distance apart.

I was looking at ornaments the other day, purely for fun, and realised if I ever had a tree, I would HAVE to have a theme. With specific colours that all matched exactly. Because it would drive me bats if I had one ornament that was a different shade of red/green/blue than all the others, and I am bats enough already. :-X ;D
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crankycat

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Re: And a partridge in a pear tree
« Reply #16 on: December 20, 2010, 01:41:58 PM »
Crankycat, that tree is fabulous. I'd be tempted to add a sparkly feather boa as garland, though.

Thank you.  Other years, I have used Barbie-pink feather boas as garland with big, pink feathers as part of the tree topper.  I have also used pink tulle wrapped around the tree like garland.  I decided to be a bit understated this year though.

Sterling

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Re: And a partridge in a pear tree
« Reply #17 on: December 21, 2010, 10:27:22 AM »
This year we bought a small black tree with white lights.  I bought silver balls in different textures to decorate and a silver and faux pearl star for the top.  All the wrappings are silver with black ribbon.

Things have to match.  I also have to have perfect cookies and I was freaking out that my ham was not coloring evenly.  lol I get a little crazy.
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alegria

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Re: And a partridge in a pear tree
« Reply #18 on: December 21, 2010, 10:35:26 AM »
There are only two other rules for decorating a Christmas Tree. 

1) Small ornaments should be placed near the top and larger ornaments placed near the bottom.

2) Ornaments at the very bottom of the tree should be of the unbreakable variety.  People will be putting presents under the tree and taking presents from under the tree.  You don't want anyone to encounter broken glass. 

I believe there is an exception to Rule 1, as if you have a larger ornament that is heavy and needs a thick sturdy branch, those are better to have up near the top where the branches are shorter and often thicker.  We have a solid pewter Dumbledore ornament that's about 5" tall and 3" wide, and it is always securely wired to a branch at the top.

For Rule 2, we use purple bells around the base of the tree - that way we also know if any of the pets try to get under the tree when we're not looking!  :D

magicdomino

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Re: And a partridge in a pear tree
« Reply #19 on: December 21, 2010, 10:40:43 AM »
Eh, I don't worry about it too much, except for separating similar decorations.  I do try to keep related ornaments in the same vicinity.  For instance, the astronaut has to be near the lunar module, and the mug of beer near the slice of pizza.

Thipu1

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Re: And a partridge in a pear tree
« Reply #20 on: December 22, 2010, 11:48:01 AM »
Eh, I don't worry about it too much, except for separating similar decorations.  I do try to keep related ornaments in the same vicinity.  For instance, the astronaut has to be near the lunar module, and the mug of beer near the slice of pizza.

Certainly, we group ornaments by theme.  Here's an example. 

When Mr. Thipu got his certification I found a felt ornament of a scuba diver.    The next year we vacationed on Bonaire.  That's a great place for diving. 

Our hotel offered the drink of the day with nicely carved and painted wooden fish as 'drink toys'.  They were so much nicer than a plastic monkey or a paper umbrella.  We took them all home and now, the felt diver dives in a great school of colorful fish in one part of our tree. I was also able to find a real 'Fiji Mermaid'.  This is a brass and steel ornament that was made in the islands.  She will wiggle at the waist with breaths of wind and reflect the lights very nicely.  Our mermaid goes into the school of fish with the diver. It's a very pretty tableau.       

Piratelvr1121

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Re: And a partridge in a pear tree
« Reply #21 on: December 23, 2010, 12:22:34 AM »
One of these days, once I've collected enough ornaments, I will try to incorporate as much of a beach/nautical/Irish/Scottish theme as I can in my Christmas decorating.   I'm still kicking myself for not getting the clear, fillable ornaments I saw at Michael's a month or so ago.   I could have put my Ocean City and Assateague sand in them, along with some small shells!

I love, love, love the beach and all things nautical and Celtic! :)   This was helped when BFF sent me two ornaments this year, an Irish and Scottish Santa. :)  (I'm of Irish decent, DH is of Scottish decent, and she has both Irish and Scottish heritage) 

I also like when the ornaments reflect the family's interests so we have a golf club ornament (for DH), a basketball player for Older DS, a little dog for YDS (who loves all living creatures, just like his daddy), and I got ODS a Ravens ornament and YDS a Spongebob ornament for their stocking stuffers. :)   

Hell, it's an eclectic/eccentric tree but that's why it even more fits our family. :)

And can you believe it has not ONE single pirate related ornament on it yet?
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

Stanwyck

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Re: And a partridge in a pear tree
« Reply #22 on: December 23, 2010, 12:47:33 PM »
One year I didn't feel like putting up the 200+ teddy bear ornaments I have, so I just decorated with novelty lights.  Bubble lights. Multi-colored chili peppers.  Pink flamingos. Tiki gods.  Drink umbrellas.  "Christmas Story" leg lamp lights.  I thought it looked pretty cool, if I do say so myself.


Piratelvr1121

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Re: And a partridge in a pear tree
« Reply #23 on: December 23, 2010, 01:01:58 PM »
Oh that is so cool! :)
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

Elfmama

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Re: And a partridge in a pear tree
« Reply #24 on: December 23, 2010, 07:57:21 PM »
I'm not really anal about where everything has to go but if a number of the ornaments are similar, they have to be on opposite sides or top to bottom.  They can't be near each other!

And larger ornaments should go lower than smaller ornaments.
No, the UNBREAKABLE ornaments should go lower!  So that when children or pets crawl under the tree and knock them off, they don't break.
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SunVixen

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Re: And a partridge in a pear tree
« Reply #25 on: December 23, 2010, 09:52:46 PM »
Read this and thought of y'all  ;D

http://comics.com/rose_is_rose/2010-12-22/
We are all wanderers on this earth. Our hearts are full of wonder, and our souls are deep with dreams.

jayhawk

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Re: And a partridge in a pear tree
« Reply #26 on: December 24, 2010, 02:37:25 PM »
There is a proper way to decorate a tree. 

Unfortunately, each tree has its own proper decoration.

Coming from an old German family. this is how we do it. 

The tree-topper goes on first.  This is a prudent thing to do.  Putting it on after the entire tree is decorated is an invitation to disaster.  Our tree-topper is a German spike.  Mr. Thipu says it looks like something that Kaiser Wilhelm would put on his helmet for a festive occasion.  I think it looks just fine.

The lights are next.  They must be lit before they're draped around the tree so that you can see what you're doing.  There must be a certain proportion observed.  There will be few lights at the top of the tree and more lights toward the bottom.  Perspective is the issue here.  The same thing is done in Disney theme-parks.

It's now time for the garland.  We have two sizes.  The wider garland goes on the bottom of the tree and a thinner one goes around the top.  This helps keep the tree in balance.  Years ago I stood aghast to see two women decorating an office tree.  They shoved the garland in around the trunk.  Garland must go outside and work with the lights.  After all if a tree is sparse, garland can serve to support light ornaments.

Ah, the ornaments.  The good ones are hung first.  We have a German glass bird that's about 140 years old.  That goes into a prominent but safe place.  We have Chinese ornaments painted inside with New York scenes.  These have to be carefully placed.  There are the mummies to be properly situated.  After that, almost all bets are off.

There are only two other rules for decorating a Christmas Tree. 

1) Small ornaments should be placed near the top and larger ornaments placed near the bottom.

2) Ornaments at the very bottom of the tree should be of the unbreakable variety.  People will be putting presents under the tree and taking presents from under the tree.  You don't want anyone to encounter broken glass. 
 

     

 

Thipu, this entire post is genius, naturlich, but especially the part about MUMMIES ORNAMENTS!!!  I would love to see a pic.

Thipu1

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Re: And a partridge in a pear tree
« Reply #27 on: December 24, 2010, 02:51:53 PM »
Novelty trees are always interesting.

At this time of year we always like to take walks around the neighborhood and look at trees in the windows. 

Yeah, I know.  It might not be polite but, if trees are in the windows the inhabitants of the houses want them to be seen. For a few years there was an awesome thing.

The tree was a very large cactus.  It was decorated with red and green pepper lights.  On a cold Brooklyn night with a bit of snow, seeing that really brought the warmth of the season into our hearts.     

geordicat

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Re: And a partridge in a pear tree
« Reply #28 on: December 26, 2010, 10:54:54 AM »
My mother can, and has, taken days to decorate the tree.  I gave up trying to 'help' because I got tired of having her move every ornament I tried to put on the tree.  She very carefully places each and every strand of tinsel and has been known to move it over 1/4 of an inch. 

Now I haven't put up a tree in 2 years because my house is TEENY and I really don't have the room, but last time we did, geordicat jr and I just put on all the cool ornaments we wanted.  It was uneven and lopsided but we thought it looked very cool.  Until the cats thought it was the Best!Present!Ever! and tried to climb the fake tree.
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Thipu1

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Re: And a partridge in a pear tree
« Reply #29 on: January 02, 2011, 01:48:14 PM »
When I was a child the tree always took days to decorate. 

The topper, the lights and the garland would go on but the boxes of ornaments were always out and family members or visiting friends would hang one or two as the spirit moved them.

The same thing happened with gifts.  We'd wrap them as they were bought or made.  It was lovely to see the tree grow and evolve as more ornaments went on and more gifts began to blossom. 

We had a Christmas Eve tradition that I dearly miss.  We called it 'Bringing out the bags'.

Most everyone on both sides of the family lived within a ten mile radius of each other.  On Christmas Eve afternoon my Mother and I would pack the gifts for each family into decorated shopping bags.  Dad and I would go out to deliver them while my Mother stayed home to receive. 

At each house there was fun.  The family either had a bag ready for us or someone was out delivering them.  Dad and I were offered cocoa and cookies.  I was sometimes allowed to place an ornament or two on a cousin's tree.  Back at home, my Mother was offering the same hospitality to other family members.  By the time we got back home, the tree had a whole new layer of gifts and ornaments.  It was a lovely thing to see.