Author Topic: Wedding Vendor: Some Salespeople Don't Understand The Job Is To Actually Sell  (Read 11365 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Asharah

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3918
Like most brides one of the parts of the wedding I was most excited about was my dress. My roommate and bridesmaid Sarah took me on the weekends to various bridal boutiques and we had fun but no success finding the perfect dress. We were both students in a town noted for the laid back attitude of its inhabitants, and I admit that we dressed accordingly, nothing revealing but no pants-suits either. Regardless, we were treated kindly and respectfully wherever we went, until...the boutique from hell.

We made the necessary appointment and arrived on time, then we waited for fifteen minutes while the sales girl made her lunch plans on the phone, occasionally looking us over derisively. When she finished she stood and looked at us from top to bottom and sneeringly said to Sarah, "nice sweater." Asharah's comment: Now would be a good time to walk out and find a store where the salespeople have manners. We correctly interpreted her to mean, "you can't afford anything in here," but I had been looking forward to trying on dresses to we persevered and asked her to show us around. Whenever I commented on a dress she would tell me how much it cost and say, "we have some dresses you might like more over here, for less." Asharah's comment: Wouldn't that cut into your commission sweetheart? I particularly liked one designer gown and asked to try it on, along with a few others, and she very reluctantly agreed to bring them to the room. I'm a pretty shy and modest person, the number of people who've seen me naked, counting my parents and sister, are less then five, and so I usually asked the sales girls if I could get into the dress myself, of if Sarah could help me. Not only did this girl refuse my request, she also informed me that she would have to see me NAKED to fit me with petticoats and a corset, "store policy" Asharah's comment: I can't imagine any salesgirl wanting to see me naked, but if they did, I would probably just leave. (It's absolutely not store policy- according to other friends who've been there). She repeatedly told us we could not take pictures of the dresses, and my best guess is she wanted to make sure I was clean and that I didn't have a camera. umm... Sarah and I were so floored, and I was so intimidated, that I just complied. She of course brought me undergarments three sized too small, and refused to get me a larger cup size, although she could see (because she had demanded to) that it fit like a Dixie cup on a watermelon. I was so embarrassed and uncomfortable by the time I actually got the dress on that it didn't matter how beautiful it was. And there was the girl, talking over Sarah's compliments, telling me that she hated to see a bride fall in love with a dress she couldn't afford. Asharah's comment: Given that most people today own credit cards, I think salespeople who make assumptions about what people can spend are morons! What a jerk. As money was unexpectedly not an issue in choosing my dress, I bought from their competitors, and tell every bride I know about their terrible store. Asharah's comment: Is it still in operation?      Vendors0623-03
Asharah's comment: First lesson on wedding dress shopping: If the saleslady greets you rudely, find another store.
« Last Edit: January 15, 2011, 09:02:17 PM by Asharah »
Asharah

Bellantara

  • Normal is a setting on the washing machine.
  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3101
I would have walked out after the fifteen minute personal phone conversation, and gotten in touch with the manager to let him/her know WHY they weren't getting my business.

Iris

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3867
^ First rule of any shopping at all, I would have said. Having said that, when I was a young student I probably would have been intimidated by this behaviour.
"Can't do anything with children, can you?" the woman said.

Poirot thought you could, but forebore to say so.

mariamousie1

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 17
She stayed waaaaay too long. I agree, I would have been walking out at "nice sweater".

Lisbeth

  • I am a rock, I am an island
  • A Pillar of the Forum
  • *****
  • Posts: 29353
  • a/k/a KeenReader
I think that after that obnoxious greeting, my first reply would have been to ask for the manager, and if the clerk continued to be rude, I'd walk out then and there.

Somehow, I've read a lot of stories about wedding vendors who behave really obnoxiously-it seems like they think that they have the right to hold brides and grooms hostage emotionally and get some kind of stupid kick out of it, just because the couples are in a hurry to finalize the arrangements for their weddings.
I'm away from sanity right now...please leave a message after the beep.
NYC

Hushabye

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 7640
Yeah, I would have been out of there at "nice sweater" -- just because I'd want to see if she really was being as snotty as the looks implied.  No way in this world would I have gotten naked for a stranger.  Much less one who insulted me.

Twik

  • A Pillar of the Forum
  • *****
  • Posts: 28457
Somehow, I've read a lot of stories about wedding vendors who behave really obnoxiously-it seems like they think that they have the right to hold brides and grooms hostage emotionally and get some kind of stupid kick out of it, just because the couples are in a hurry to finalize the arrangements for their weddings.

I agree - the most egregious stories about sales clerks always seem to be in wedding stores. I don't know, is there some sort of secret training for them that teaches "keep 'em keen, by treating 'em mean"?
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

Sabbyfrog2

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6754
  • I'm a Super Hero! Now where's my cape?

I agree - the most egregious stories about sales clerks always seem to be in wedding stores. I don't know, is there some sort of secret training for them that teaches "keep 'em keen, by treating 'em mean"?

Where do you come up with that stuff!? LOL! LOL!

Yvaine

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 8855
Somehow, I've read a lot of stories about wedding vendors who behave really obnoxiously-it seems like they think that they have the right to hold brides and grooms hostage emotionally and get some kind of stupid kick out of it, just because the couples are in a hurry to finalize the arrangements for their weddings.

I agree - the most egregious stories about sales clerks always seem to be in wedding stores. I don't know, is there some sort of secret training for them that teaches "keep 'em keen, by treating 'em mean"?

Yeah, I always wonder if they're thinking they don't need to worry about customer retention, since the wedding will soon be over and then they may never see that particular bride again--but they're not considering the possibility of the bride taking her business elsewhere in the first place, or the damage she can do by word-of-mouth. Congratulations, salespeople, you've just lost all the bride's friends' business!  >:D

Asharah

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3918
Somehow, I've read a lot of stories about wedding vendors who behave really obnoxiously-it seems like they think that they have the right to hold brides and grooms hostage emotionally and get some kind of stupid kick out of it, just because the couples are in a hurry to finalize the arrangements for their weddings.

I agree - the most egregious stories about sales clerks always seem to be in wedding stores. I don't know, is there some sort of secret training for them that teaches "keep 'em keen, by treating 'em mean"?

Yeah, I always wonder if they're thinking they don't need to worry about customer retention, since the wedding will soon be over and then they may never see that particular bride again--but they're not considering the possibility of the bride taking her business elsewhere in the first place, or the damage she can do by word-of-mouth. Congratulations, salespeople, you've just lost all the bride's friends' business!  >:D
Not to mention the bridal party. One bride who's story is here somewhere told an equally rude saleswoman who made presumptions about her financial situation that she was having a huge wedding and the bridal party and family added up to more than 20 people buying and renting formal attire that would NOT be using her shop.
Asharah

HonorH

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2977
Somehow, I've read a lot of stories about wedding vendors who behave really obnoxiously-it seems like they think that they have the right to hold brides and grooms hostage emotionally and get some kind of stupid kick out of it, just because the couples are in a hurry to finalize the arrangements for their weddings.

I agree - the most egregious stories about sales clerks always seem to be in wedding stores. I don't know, is there some sort of secret training for them that teaches "keep 'em keen, by treating 'em mean"?

Yeah, I always wonder if they're thinking they don't need to worry about customer retention, since the wedding will soon be over and then they may never see that particular bride again--but they're not considering the possibility of the bride taking her business elsewhere in the first place, or the damage she can do by word-of-mouth. Congratulations, salespeople, you've just lost all the bride's friends' business!  >:D
Not to mention the bridal party. One bride who's story is here somewhere told an equally rude saleswoman who made presumptions about her financial situation that she was having a huge wedding and the bridal party and family added up to more than 20 people buying and renting formal attire that would NOT be using her shop.

Yeah, this is really what it's about. One bride isn't necessarily that big a deal (though I know from someone who used to work at a bridal shop that they get a sweeeet commission for some of those gowns); a bride, a MOH, three bridesmaids, one junior bridesmaid, a flower girl, a MOB, a MOG and rental tuxes for the entire groom's party (and FOB and FOG)? That's an awful lot of potential money you're letting walk out your door with a disgruntled bride.
William wondered why he always disliked people who said "no offense meant." Maybe it was because they found it easier to say "no offense meant" than actually to refrain from giving offense.

--Terry Pratchett, The Truth

LadyR

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1002
    • Musings of A Pinterest Mom
I had a great experience buying my dress, but trying on BM dresses was a nightmare. The sales lady was so dismissive and in the end, while we loved one dress, my girls all ordered it from the other store in town (5 dresses x $200), my mom and FGs also went elsewhere.


norrina

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 968
Somehow, I've read a lot of stories about wedding vendors who behave really obnoxiously-it seems like they think that they have the right to hold brides and grooms hostage emotionally and get some kind of stupid kick out of it, just because the couples are in a hurry to finalize the arrangements for their weddings.

I agree - the most egregious stories about sales clerks always seem to be in wedding stores. I don't know, is there some sort of secret training for them that teaches "keep 'em keen, by treating 'em mean"?

I ran into this yesterday trying to look at white sapphires for an engagement ring. I went into two stores where the clerks were more than happy to show me their white sapphires, until they deduced that I wanted this stone for an e-ring. As soon as they gleaned this bit of information, they became very pitying and patronizing. "Oh, honey, no. Wouldn't you rather have a diamond? Just a small diamond dearie, that won't cost too much. Or if he can't afford that, they have done amazing things with moissanite, you can't even tell it isn't a diamond."

I finally got frustrated, went home and changed from my jeans, snow boots and grungy down coat into slacks, Italian leather shoes and black wool coat, and tried again. Perhaps it was just coincidence, but the third shop didn't seem to feel the need to make presumptions about my financial situation.



Iris

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3867

I ran into this yesterday trying to look at white sapphires for an engagement ring. I went into two stores where the clerks were more than happy to show me their white sapphires, until they deduced that I wanted this stone for an e-ring. As soon as they gleaned this bit of information, they became very pitying and patronizing. "Oh, honey, no. Wouldn't you rather have a diamond? Just a small diamond dearie, that won't cost too much. Or if he can't afford that, they have done amazing things with moissanite, you can't even tell it isn't a diamond."

In this case it's probably because the one time in people's lives that they've been completely conned into spending more money than they can reasonably afford on a piece of jewellry is the engagement ring. They try to push eternity rings, they try to push maternity rings, but by far the most successful case of collective brainwashing has got to be the "three months salary" on an engagement ring thing.

If you go about the place, spreading evil propaganda that you DON'T have to have a diamond, and it doesn't have to be huge, and he STILL LOVES YOU (gasp) then what will happen? Won't somebody think of the (De Beers) children?! [/overdramatising]

I'm not that old, but am still old enough to remember when it was one month's salary. I am actually curious as to how far they can push it before we all wake up.
"Can't do anything with children, can you?" the woman said.

Poirot thought you could, but forebore to say so.

norrina

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 968

I ran into this yesterday trying to look at white sapphires for an engagement ring. I went into two stores where the clerks were more than happy to show me their white sapphires, until they deduced that I wanted this stone for an e-ring. As soon as they gleaned this bit of information, they became very pitying and patronizing. "Oh, honey, no. Wouldn't you rather have a diamond? Just a small diamond dearie, that won't cost too much. Or if he can't afford that, they have done amazing things with moissanite, you can't even tell it isn't a diamond."

<snip> In this case it's probably because the one time in people's lives that they've been completely conned into spending more money than they can reasonably afford on a piece of jewellry is the engagement ring. They try to push eternity rings, they try to push maternity rings, but by far the most successful case of collective brainwashing has got to be the "three months salary" on an engagement ring thing. </snip>


I think "they" have managed to catch my boyfriend in their net too. I told him from the instant he started talking about rings that I didn't necessarily want a diamond, and if we did go that route, I only wanted a small diamond because I have small hands. He has persisted in taking me to look at diamond encrusted settings with large diamond solitaires. Even now that we're looking at white sapphires he has an eye towards replacing the stone with a diamond for an anniversary.

Well, bully for "them," because I have absolutely fallen in love with an antique style ring channel set with diamonds but with a blue topaz main stone, and I don't want to replace that unique colorful topaz with a run-of-the-mill clear diamond later! (Which is not, please know, any sort of disparagement at all against diamond e-rings, I just really LOVED that ring with topaz and it feels like me.)