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Author Topic: Culture Shock Stories  (Read 255599 times)

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Micah

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Re: Culture Shock Stories
« Reply #855 on: July 03, 2011, 06:40:47 PM »
Sweet chilli sauce is beautiful with a lot of things. Potato wedges are one. Potato wedges and sour cream, mmmm mmmm.

Do you have Worcestershire sauce in America? I use it ALLL the time, in stews, sauces, soups. Great stuff.

And what is cheesesteak?
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Danika

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Re: Culture Shock Stories
« Reply #856 on: July 03, 2011, 07:09:18 PM »
Ereine, I've been to Finland and Scandanavia, but I don't remember witnessing this. I've heard that people in Sweden, anyway, eat pizza with a fork and knife. Is that right? In the US, we eat it with our hands:

#borecore

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Re: Culture Shock Stories
« Reply #857 on: July 03, 2011, 08:26:45 PM »
Count me as an American who likes sweet or spicy chili sauce (but only tolerates ketchup). I put Sriracha on almost any savory dish.

Worcestershire sauce is common here; I avoid anything that contains it, though, as I'm a vegetarian and it's got anchovies.

I know plenty of people who eat pizza with a fork and knife, too. They're just more focused on neatness than some of us (me).

Diane AKA Traska

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Re: Culture Shock Stories
« Reply #858 on: July 03, 2011, 08:36:13 PM »
Sweet chilli sauce is beautiful with a lot of things. Potato wedges are one. Potato wedges and sour cream, mmmm mmmm.

Do you have Worcestershire sauce in America? I use it ALLL the time, in stews, sauces, soups. Great stuff.

And what is cheesesteak?

A cheesesteak is a regional dish here in the Philadelphia area... you start with beef sliced incredibly thin... about the thickness of a paper match.  You chop it up into smallish pieces, fry it up (preferably with onions), then add provolone, repeat, provolone cheese (some people will tell you that Cheeze Whiz is used.  These people are tourists).  Place the fried steak and melted cheese (and the onions... you ordered it with, right?) onto a long Italian roll.  Bizarrely, some people have decided that green peppers are necessary on a cheesesteak.  These people likely could not find Philadelpbhia on a map if it were a map of the Camden area.  A cheesesteak is greasy and not at all good for you, but it is very tasty.

What a cheesesteak should look like (about halfway down)
http://www.real-philly-cheese-steak.com/johns.html

What a cheesesteak should NOT look like
http://www.npr.org/news/national/election2000/conventions/postcards.cheesesteak.html
Location:
Philadelphia, PA

Kaora

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Re: Culture Shock Stories
« Reply #859 on: July 03, 2011, 09:16:31 PM »
Sweet chilli sauce is beautiful with a lot of things. Potato wedges are one. Potato wedges and sour cream, mmmm mmmm.

Do you have Worcestershire sauce in America? I use it ALLL the time, in stews, sauces, soups. Great stuff.

Yes, yes we do have it!  It's used all the time here for cooking!  :)

Larrabee

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Re: Culture Shock Stories
« Reply #860 on: July 03, 2011, 09:16:54 PM »
Ereine, I've been to Finland and Scandanavia, but I don't remember witnessing this. I've heard that people in Sweden, anyway, eat pizza with a fork and knife. Is that right? In the US, we eat it with our hands:


In the UK, sometimes pizza is eaten with hands and sometimes with a knife and fork.  In a more casual setting like a Pizza Hut or a family friendly casual restaurant hands are fine.  In a nicer pizzeria or Italian restaurant you would cut it up and eat it like a piece of meat.  The way to tell how you're supposed to handle it is how the pizza is served, if its cut into slices when its brought to you then its fine to pick it up, if it isn't then you should eat it with a knife and fork.

MRSW

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Re: Culture Shock Stories
« Reply #861 on: July 03, 2011, 09:23:47 PM »
Ereine, I've been to Finland and Scandanavia, but I don't remember witnessing this. I've heard that people in Sweden, anyway, eat pizza with a fork and knife. Is that right? In the US, we eat it with our hands:


In the UK, sometimes pizza is eaten with hands and sometimes with a knife and fork.  In a more casual setting like a Pizza Hut or a family friendly casual restaurant hands are fine.  In a nicer pizzeria or Italian restaurant you would cut it up and eat it like a piece of meat.  The way to tell how you're supposed to handle it is how the pizza is served, if its cut into slices when its brought to you then its fine to pick it up, if it isn't then you should eat it with a knife and fork.

Do you have to cut the servings for yourself if it's not cut then? That's odd to me because I've always seen it pre-cut even at nicer Italian places.  People typically do eat it with a knife & fork at the higher quality places, especially those which serve many more things than just pizza.

Larrabee

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Re: Culture Shock Stories
« Reply #862 on: July 03, 2011, 09:26:59 PM »
Ereine, I've been to Finland and Scandanavia, but I don't remember witnessing this. I've heard that people in Sweden, anyway, eat pizza with a fork and knife. Is that right? In the US, we eat it with our hands:


In the UK, sometimes pizza is eaten with hands and sometimes with a knife and fork.  In a more casual setting like a Pizza Hut or a family friendly casual restaurant hands are fine.  In a nicer pizzeria or Italian restaurant you would cut it up and eat it like a piece of meat.  The way to tell how you're supposed to handle it is how the pizza is served, if its cut into slices when its brought to you then its fine to pick it up, if it isn't then you should eat it with a knife and fork.

Do you have to cut the servings for yourself if it's not cut then? That's odd to me because I've always seen it pre-cut even at nicer Italian places.  People typically do eat it with a knife & fork at the higher quality places, especially those which serve many more things than just pizza.

Yes, at the nicer places you just get served the whole pizza and you cut it yourself.  At the places where you'd eat pizza with a knife and fork does it come cut into the same triangular slices as casual places or a different way?

Micah

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Re: Culture Shock Stories
« Reply #863 on: July 03, 2011, 10:54:54 PM »
Sweet chilli sauce is beautiful with a lot of things. Potato wedges are one. Potato wedges and sour cream, mmmm mmmm.


And what is cheesesteak?

A cheesesteak is a regional dish here in the Philadelphia area... you start with beef sliced incredibly thin... about the thickness of a paper match.  You chop it up into smallish pieces, fry it up (preferably with onions), then add provolone, repeat, provolone cheese (some people will tell you that Cheeze Whiz is used.  These people are tourists).  Place the fried steak and melted cheese (and the onions... you ordered it with, right?) onto a long Italian roll.  Bizarrely, some people have decided that green peppers are necessary on a cheesesteak.  These people likely could not find Philadelpbhia on a map if it were a map of the Camden area.  A cheesesteak is greasy and not at all good for you, but it is very tasty.

What a cheesesteak should look like (about halfway down)
http://www.real-philly-cheese-steak.com/johns.html

What a cheesesteak should NOT look like
http://www.npr.org/news/national/election2000/conventions/postcards.cheesesteak.html

Ahhhh, thank you! I've read a lot of mentions of cheesesteak in books and online and always wondered what it was. Was never so curious enough to google it though  ;D. I always had visions of a full slab of steak, with normal cheese, like cheddar being involved somewhere. The actual thing looks and sounds yummy!
Mulder: "So...Lunch?"
Scully: "Mulder, toads just fell from the sky!"
Mulder: "Maybe their parachutes didn't open."

Ereine

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Re: Culture Shock Stories
« Reply #864 on: July 04, 2011, 12:33:56 AM »
Ereine, I've been to Finland and Scandanavia, but I don't remember witnessing this. I've heard that people in Sweden, anyway, eat pizza with a fork and knife. Is that right?

I eat pizza with a fork and knife (and our pizzas are almost always pre-cut), though sometimes I might not. I think that it's common, some people use forks and some their hands, maybe forks are more common. That's only for the kebab-pizzeria pizzas though and maybe only for take away, at least in my experience if you go to a real restaurant it would seem as strange to eat with your hands as it would be to eat a steak with hands. I might be mistaken though, I only eat pizza maybe twice a year and don't go to restaurants much.

Diane AKA Traska

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Re: Culture Shock Stories
« Reply #865 on: July 04, 2011, 01:08:24 AM »
So anyway, I found some chili sauce today (odd that the store website said their closest store with the stuff was 70 miles away, but hey).  It is pretty much like spiced ketchup, but it is good.  Yeah, I can see myself buying this frequently.
Location:
Philadelphia, PA

MRSW

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Re: Culture Shock Stories
« Reply #866 on: July 04, 2011, 01:15:19 AM »
Ereine, I've been to Finland and Scandanavia, but I don't remember witnessing this. I've heard that people in Sweden, anyway, eat pizza with a fork and knife. Is that right? In the US, we eat it with our hands:


In the UK, sometimes pizza is eaten with hands and sometimes with a knife and fork.  In a more casual setting like a Pizza Hut or a family friendly casual restaurant hands are fine.  In a nicer pizzeria or Italian restaurant you would cut it up and eat it like a piece of meat.  The way to tell how you're supposed to handle it is how the pizza is served, if its cut into slices when its brought to you then its fine to pick it up, if it isn't then you should eat it with a knife and fork.

Do you have to cut the servings for yourself if it's not cut then? That's odd to me because I've always seen it pre-cut even at nicer Italian places.  People typically do eat it with a knife & fork at the higher quality places, especially those which serve many more things than just pizza.

Yes, at the nicer places you just get served the whole pizza and you cut it yourself.  At the places where you'd eat pizza with a knife and fork does it come cut into the same triangular slices as casual places or a different way?

It still comes in triangular slices.  I don't know that they're super pricey in terms of what you're thinking. I'd say Pizza Hut=$, Pizzeria=$$, Place I'm thinking of=$$$

Diane AKA Traska

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Re: Culture Shock Stories
« Reply #867 on: July 04, 2011, 03:09:45 AM »
Can I just say that I find it incredibly odd to eat pizza with utensils?  To me, that'd be like eating fries with a fork, or tater tots, or a cheeseburger, or a ham sandwich.

Not saying anyone is wrong for doing it, it's just bizarre to me.
Location:
Philadelphia, PA

iridaceae

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Re: Culture Shock Stories
« Reply #868 on: July 04, 2011, 03:14:36 AM »
Can I just say that I find it incredibly odd to eat pizza with utensils?  To me, that'd be like eating fries with a fork, or tater tots, or a cheeseburger, or a ham sandwich.

Not saying anyone is wrong for doing it, it's just bizarre to me.

When we were in Italy last year- visiting my uncle, who retired there- his deceased wife's family took us out to dinner one night. They are Italians, for the record. They took us to what was one of their favorite restaurants- a little restaurant that mainly served pizza. I was astonished that the one relative, who must be in her early thirties, ate her pizza neatly with a knife and fork. 
Nothing to see here.

Mazdoy

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Re: Culture Shock Stories
« Reply #869 on: July 04, 2011, 03:48:45 AM »
(Ireland) I almost always eat pizza with a knife and fork unless I'm sitting in front of the tv with a takeaway pizza.  In a restaurant I would definitely use utensils.  I didn't realise this was odd until some Canadian friends pointed it out when they were visiting.