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  • June 24, 2016, 10:28:03 PM

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Author Topic: Where do you live?  (Read 3164 times)

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jayhawk

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Re: Where do you live?
« Reply #60 on: June 15, 2016, 03:11:32 PM »
Lawrence, Kansas, a medium-sized university town in the Midwest US. I grew up in a rural area south of here and moved 25 years ago. Love this town because it's so diverse.  People come from literally worldwide to attend/work at the university, so I've learned a lot about different cultures. Also there is a thriving arts community, good shopping, decent housing, etc. The town has its problems like any other but all in all I'm very happy I moved here. Also met my husband here so that's another reason I like it!

Waiving from Topeka, 20 miles west on I-70. As you can see from my name, I'm a proud KU grad! Rock Chalk! I loved living in Lawrence while in undergrad and law school and a few years in-between. Still love to come over and stroll and shop Massachusetts Street.

Waving from the east!  I live in Olathe.  Lived in Topeka for a short time many, many years ago--the year the tornado went through (1988).

I am originally from small town Iowa (under 200), but have not lived in that small of a town since. I am in the southwest corner of the KCMetro area and love our location in the metro.  Close to so many things and others are less than 3o/40 minutes away.  We have great access to the interstate.

Love my neighborhood--for my neighbors most of all but I am also close to so many stores, restaurants, banks, etc. that I really can get almost anything I need in my 2 mile radius! We have great schools and city programs, access to many college/university programs, taxes aren't too bad.

Back at ya!

sammycat

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Re: Where do you live?
« Reply #61 on: June 15, 2016, 06:43:28 PM »
I live in the suburbs on the edge of the capital city of my Australian state. The state CBD is about a 45 minute drive or train ride away and lots of people commute from here to the city daily. 

We've lived here for about 14 years, and this suburb and the surrounding ones have grown quite substantially in that time, but it's still retained a small town area feel.  Until about 20 years ago this was a fairly rural area, so I often wonder what the original inhabitants think of all this "progress".

Prior to this we used to live about 15 minutes from the CBD, and although we lived in a very quiet street, I hated all the nearby traffic, house styles (generally, post war weatherboard 1940/1950s style) and general "oldness"of a typical inner city fringe area.  It was bliss moving to a new area and living in our brand new home with lots of green space and wider roads.

crella

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Re: Where do you live?
« Reply #62 on: June 15, 2016, 07:06:39 PM »
I was born in Boston, lived there till 1st grade, then we moved out near Salem MA.

When I First came to Japan we lived in Kobe City, then Miki, then back to Kobe again to Kita-ku, out in back of the mountains on the north side of the city. Kita-ku is jokingly called ' the Tibet of Kobe' because of both the elevation and the cold winter. It's the only area in Kobe that gets down to-6C in the winter. It's lovely out there, quiet and cool in the summer.

Now I live  on Awaji Island .We've been here for four years now. We both love the ocean, and DH's grandmother was born on the island, so he'd wanted to live here a long time. We'd come over and look at land and houses, and never found anything quite right, and continued to look off and on. The other factor was DH would have had to go to work by ferry. It stopped in harsh weather, and until you got down to the dock in the morning you'd have no idea how long the wait was. It would have been too hard trying to commute that way.

The Akashi Kaikyo Bridge was completed in '98 but by then we'd settled into Kita-ku, bought a house and everything, in '96. The tolls were outrageous, too, about $60 round trip!  The bridge is a thing of beauty, and I used to love renewing my driver's license because the office is near the mainland anchor of the bridge where there's a park, so afterwards I'd go there and enjoy the view.

In 2011 DH was on the net, and started to yell, "Look at this! Come here!" He'd found land facing the bridge, up on a hill, a perfect view. We moved over here in 2012. The tolls were reduced to about $8 each way, which was the final push we needed.

There's a good bit to do, Awaji is known for fresh fish, fruit, and flowers. There are several parks devoted to seasonal floral displays and an indoor botanical garden. There's an herb park further south (fields of lavender), a koala park, and small museums. A disused elementary school has been converted and houses a casual cafe, full course restaurant , a shop selling local veggies and honey, and a bakery. The bakery holds classes.

The fault that ruptured in the '95 quake has been preserved as is and is covered with a building, and is now a museum where you can study about earthquakes. It's astonishing. On one side of the fault the land rose about 7 feet in 20 seconds. There's an earthquake simulator you can try and experience briefly the same strength quake (although I don't recommend it if you have back problems, the jerking is a bit severe) .

One of the largest parks is in a place called Yume Butai (Stage of Dreams) . It was designed and built by Tadao Ando in the space vacated by land excavation for Kansai Airport. You could spend all day there and not se e everything, if you like architecture. If not, you can see the national park and terraced gardens in a day.

I worried that it might be hard to get things, but that's not the case, and Kobe is only 30 minutes away, so,it's worked out well.

Edited for clarity.
« Last Edit: June 15, 2016, 07:08:18 PM by crella »

siamesecat2965

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Re: Where do you live?
« Reply #63 on: June 16, 2016, 08:00:08 AM »
I was born in Boston, lived there till 1st grade, then we moved out near Salem MA.

When I First came to Japan we lived in Kobe City, then Miki, then back to Kobe again to Kita-ku, out in back of the mountains on the north side of the city. Kita-ku is jokingly called ' the Tibet of Kobe' because of both the elevation and the cold winter. It's the only area in Kobe that gets down to-6C in the winter. It's lovely out there, quiet and cool in the summer.

Now I live  on Awaji Island .We've been here for four years now. We both love the ocean, and DH's grandmother was born on the island, so he'd wanted to live here a long time. We'd come over and look at land and houses, and never found anything quite right, and continued to look off and on. The other factor was DH would have had to go to work by ferry. It stopped in harsh weather, and until you got down to the dock in the morning you'd have no idea how long the wait was. It would have been too hard trying to commute that way.

The Akashi Kaikyo Bridge was completed in '98 but by then we'd settled into Kita-ku, bought a house and everything, in '96. The tolls were outrageous, too, about $60 round trip!  The bridge is a thing of beauty, and I used to love renewing my driver's license because the office is near the mainland anchor of the bridge where there's a park, so afterwards I'd go there and enjoy the view.

In 2011 DH was on the net, and started to yell, "Look at this! Come here!" He'd found land facing the bridge, up on a hill, a perfect view. We moved over here in 2012. The tolls were reduced to about $8 each way, which was the final push we needed.

There's a good bit to do, Awaji is known for fresh fish, fruit, and flowers. There are several parks devoted to seasonal floral displays and an indoor botanical garden. There's an herb park further south (fields of lavender), a koala park, and small museums. A disused elementary school has been converted and houses a casual cafe, full course restaurant , a shop selling local veggies and honey, and a bakery. The bakery holds classes.

The fault that ruptured in the '95 quake has been preserved as is and is covered with a building, and is now a museum where you can study about earthquakes. It's astonishing. On one side of the fault the land rose about 7 feet in 20 seconds. There's an earthquake simulator you can try and experience briefly the same strength quake (although I don't recommend it if you have back problems, the jerking is a bit severe) .

One of the largest parks is in a place called Yume Butai (Stage of Dreams) . It was designed and built by Tadao Ando in the space vacated by land excavation for Kansai Airport. You could spend all day there and not se e everything, if you like architecture. If not, you can see the national park and terraced gardens in a day.

I worried that it might be hard to get things, but that's not the case, and Kobe is only 30 minutes away, so,it's worked out well.

Edited for clarity.

that sounds lovely!

crella

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Re: Where do you live?
« Reply #64 on: June 16, 2016, 09:19:29 AM »
Quote
that sounds lovely!

We feel really lucky to be able to live where we dreamed of living for so long.

Here's a link to some photos of Yumebutai:

http://www.designrulz.com/architecture/2012/09/awaji-yumebutai-international-conference-center-by-tadao-ando/

and the converted elementary school:

http://www.nojima-scuola.com/

amandaelizabeth

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Re: Where do you live?
« Reply #65 on: June 16, 2016, 07:17:08 PM »
I  live in Auckland, which is New Zealand's largest city but not its Capital. There are approximately One and a half Million people living here out of a total of four and a half million.  New Zealand is in the bottom half of the Pacific and we have a largish Island of our shores called Australia.  We are renown for our sheep although we are cutting down from approximately 22 per person a couple of years ago to just over 10 now.  We know them all by name of course!

We live in a suburb not too far from the centre, and are considered to be an inner suburb.  However being NZ it is still mostly quarter acre sections with lots of verge gardens and mature trees.  It is a very mixed suburb with lots of new New Zealanders.  On our driveway there are a Tongan Family, A Filipino family, a multi-generational Mainland Chinese family and us aa Scots family by the way of Central Africa.  Over the fence one way come from Hungary and the other from India.  So it can be like the Tower of Babel when we all get together.  There are residents from Korea and Somalia and Afghanistan living around us.  The local High School (which is the largest in New Zealand) has 2,600 pupils who come from 64 countries.  Walking down the local high street is an adventure in its self and we can get all sorts of different take aways.

The climate here is considered a temperate one, and we are in the middle of winter so the night time temperatures are about 5 degrees rising to 20 during the day (that is about 40 degrees to mid 60)
Of course New Zealand is a very green and pleasant land, but only because it rains here a lot.  The Auckland Ismus lies between the Pacific Ocean and the Tasman Sea at it only about a mile at its narrowest, so weather changes are frequent.  Lots of rainbows though. 

I love living here, it is close enough to Central Auckland so we can access concerts plays etc, but only 10 mins up the motor way to fields full of cows - and sheep. 

Edited because Kiwi's do write english although you couldn't tell from my original posting.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2016, 07:32:26 PM by amandaelizabeth »

Thipu1

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Re: Where do you live?
« Reply #66 on: June 22, 2016, 09:15:57 AM »
We live in Park Slope, Brooklyn.  It's an urban neighborhood that's miles away from Manhattan both physically and philosophically.  Few buildings are over four stories high and there is plenty of greenery. We have wonderful light. 

The population is varied with a vibrant LGBT community and a concentration of families with young children.  There's a big overlap among the two groups.

Restaurants, green grocers and other food shops are varied and reasonably priced.  There aren't many chains.  Some years ago, Benneton moved in and lasted less than six months.

  It's common for merchants to have benches outside where patrons can sit with coffee and the paper on pleasant days and schmooze.  The area really does have a small town feel. 

The one thing I don't like about the neighborhood are the insane real estate prices.  Recently, an apartment
identical to the one we bought for 90K was sold for over 1.5 million. 

Otherwise, it's just about perfect.  We have a YMCA, a big park, libraries, a museum and a botanic garden within walking distance. 

guihong

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Re: Where do you live?
« Reply #67 on: June 22, 2016, 10:52:26 AM »
Thipu, are there any memorials to the plane crash in 1960 when a United jet slammed into that neighborhood?  That must have been horrific :(.



Gladly

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Re: Where do you live?
« Reply #68 on: Yesterday at 03:50:48 AM »
I grew up in the west of Scotland, about 25 miles from Glasgow, and about 10 miles from the sea.  A lovely area, close enough to go into the city, but still a rural village.  I spent about 5 years living in Glasgow when I started working.  Then I moved to Wiltshire, and have been here for the last 20 years.  We live in a little village (only about 700 residents), with a hotel and 2 pubs, but no other amenities.  That said we are 6 miles from Swindon,and if us country bumpkins want Kultur, we are 20 from Oxford, an hour on the train to London and a little less to Bristol.

The only down side is that my mother still lives in the village where I grew up, and it's a 7-8 hour drive to get to her if she has an emergency.  I know that's not far by US standards, but it's huge here!  Folks think I'm mad driving that distance in a day, but it's a lot cheaper to pile 5 dogs in the back of the car if I have to go without much notice, than to buy them air tickets!

Thipu1

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Re: Where do you live?
« Reply #69 on: Yesterday at 05:35:02 AM »
Thipu, are there any memorials to the plane crash in 1960 when a United jet slammed into that neighborhood?  That must have been horrific :(.

There is no monument at the site itself.  There is a nice monument in Greenwood Cemetery at the southern end of the neighborhood. 

siamesecat2965

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Re: Where do you live?
« Reply #70 on: Yesterday at 07:37:35 AM »
I grew up in the west of Scotland, about 25 miles from Glasgow, and about 10 miles from the sea.  A lovely area, close enough to go into the city, but still a rural village.  I spent about 5 years living in Glasgow when I started working.  Then I moved to Wiltshire, and have been here for the last 20 years.  We live in a little village (only about 700 residents), with a hotel and 2 pubs, but no other amenities.  That said we are 6 miles from Swindon,and if us country bumpkins want Kultur, we are 20 from Oxford, an hour on the train to London and a little less to Bristol.

The only down side is that my mother still lives in the village where I grew up, and it's a 7-8 hour drive to get to her if she has an emergency.  I know that's not far by US standards, but it's huge here!  Folks think I'm mad driving that distance in a day, but it's a lot cheaper to pile 5 dogs in the back of the car if I have to go without much notice, than to buy them air tickets!

Nope, not at all. until last fall, my mom lived about 7-8 hours from me, here in the US. it was much easier to drive; get up, leave around 6-6:30 am and arrive in the early afternoon. Flying was way more expensive, and required a 45 min drive to the airport, park offsite, take the shuttle to the terminal, check in, go through security etc. First flight was around 8:15, and arrived shortly before 10. MOm lived about the same distance from the arriving airport. So my options then were rent a car, have her pick me up, or take a shuttle, which meant I had to wait until the 11am since it ran every hour.

And as mom lived in a tourist area, the shuttle could have multiple stops, so more than likely, i wouldn't arrive until close to 1, which wasn't all that much earlier than if I drove. Plus, if i flew, i had to also pay for parking my car, and transport to and from the airport in her state. And i had no car while there!

Gladly

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Re: Where do you live?
« Reply #71 on: Yesterday at 09:45:35 AM »
Exactly.  Thank you Siamesecat!  I'm about an hour from the airport, plus check-in time, flying time, unloading time and the time it would take to get to Mum's without a car (or hiring one)  - even longer if I had to check dogs in and out.  That takes me almost as long as driving, and is much, much more expensive. 

Then I get the comments about concentrating on driving for so long.  My answer to that is "Audio books are a wonderful invention!"  In fact when I arrived there last week, I was tempted to stay on the motorway a for couple more junctions and loop back, so I could find out what happened in the book!

(Edited because I do know that sentences start with a capital letter!)

siamesecat2965

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Re: Where do you live?
« Reply #72 on: Yesterday at 02:08:02 PM »
Exactly.  Thank you Siamesecat!  I'm about an hour from the airport, plus check-in time, flying time, unloading time and the time it would take to get to Mum's without a car (or hiring one)  - even longer if I had to check dogs in and out.  That takes me almost as long as driving, and is much, much more expensive. 

Then I get the comments about concentrating on driving for so long.  My answer to that is "Audio books are a wonderful invention!"  In fact when I arrived there last week, I was tempted to stay on the motorway a for couple more junctions and loop back, so I could find out what happened in the book!

(Edited because I do know that sentences start with a capital letter!)

I can't tell you how many people are amazed that I can do that drive, all at once, alone. um, well, I really don't have much choice, do i? But in the last few years, usually on my way home, i would sometimes stop and spend the night, even though I can do it in one shot. The last 3 hours or so on my way home are soooo very boring. Depended on what day I left too; if it was Sat, i would leave later, stay over, and get up and be home Sunday before 10.

And on the way down, I have cousins about 2/3 of the way and I have an open invite to stay with them anytime.

Sadly, audiobooks lull me to sleep .No matter how interesting; how good the reader is, I zone out. not great while driving!

Although just about a year ago Mom and I did a doozy of a trip. mostly me. She wanted to come up and look at places to live. Ok fine. But she isn't able to drive up alone. So I left on a Thursday, drove down, Friday we drove back up, about 3/4+ of the way, Sat am we looked at a place nearby, then drove to right near where I live. Spent the night in a hotel, got up Sunday, drove to the place she ended up moving to, and then after, drove back halfway, spent the night, Monday drove home to her place.

Tuesday I got up and drove only halfway, as I was exhausted, then home Wed. I still had the rest of the week off but honestly, i was so tired, i got nothing done. But it had to be done, and now she's 30 mins from me, so it was well worth it.