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The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread

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Virg:
Diane AKA Traska wrote:

"We have what the furniture store said was a breakfront that is identical to what you called a hutch, except it has two small doored compartments (each about the size of a box that could hold a gallon milk jug).  :)"

A breakfront is a type of furniture, not a description of a piece itself.  To give you an analogy, if I walked into my kitchen and said I had a side-by-side, and you responded that you'd call that item a refrigerator, we'd both be right.  Then I could walk into my living room and point out another side-by-side, which holds the TV.  "Breakfront" means that it's got a specific shape to the front of it, so one could have a breakfront hutch and a breakfront china cabinet and while it would be confusing, you could legitimately call them both a "breakfront" for short.

Virg

Diane AKA Traska:
It's probably here that I should mention that, at the age of thirty-nine, I have never been furniture shopping.  Mom and I always lived together, and it was her province to buy the furnishings, and she only passed recently (has it really been FOUR years?!), so we've still got the old furniture.  But we are going to move soon, so when we do I'll be buying furniture for the first time.

Assuming I don't buy it off Craigslist...

camlan:
There's the technical definition of breakfront: A piece of furniture having the line of its front broken by a curve or angle.

And there's how furniture manufacturers use the term, which seems to be a piece of furniture with cabinets on the bottom and a glass door display area on top, regardless of the shape of the front.

My parents had a buffet with a definite curve to the front of it, so it was a breakfront buffet. But it did not have the china cabinet part on top. Still a breakfront, though, because of its shape.

Slartibartfast:
I was watching this beautiful video and it made me wonder: how do you write down dance choreography?  I mean, the other arts all have written forms: there's a standard way to notate a play, film script, sheet music, etc.  But it seems like even if you wrote down the technical terms for the dance moves, you'd still need a way to say "You do this one facing this way, then turn and do this thing with your arms while your feet are doing this other thing, and then you try to express this emotion while doing a whatchamacallit going that direction."  Do you just have to videotape everything?  And what did people do before videotape?

blue2000:

--- Quote from: Slartibartfast on March 11, 2013, 12:17:36 PM ---I was watching this beautiful video and it made me wonder: how do you write down dance choreography?  I mean, the other arts all have written forms: there's a standard way to notate a play, film script, sheet music, etc.  But it seems like even if you wrote down the technical terms for the dance moves, you'd still need a way to say "You do this one facing this way, then turn and do this thing with your arms while your feet are doing this other thing, and then you try to express this emotion while doing a whatchamacallit going that direction."  Do you just have to videotape everything?  And what did people do before videotape?

--- End quote ---

You can write it down. All the great ballets you see are written, although they may be adapted for a particular performance/director. Dance movements on stage have a language just as much as play and film movements (Walk, stage left. Leap, stage right. Run, centre). I have no idea of the names of all the steps, though.

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