Author Topic: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread  (Read 843879 times)

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Outdoor Girl

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #4005 on: January 03, 2012, 11:56:52 AM »
Whenever I accidentally buy something that says 'Dry Clean Only', I wash it in cold water with Zero or Woolite on the delicate cycle, hang to dry and hope for the best.  I refuse to dry clean clothes.

Maybe if I owned an expensive evening dress or something but even my fancy clothes aren't that fancy.
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Luci45

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #4006 on: January 03, 2012, 01:20:48 PM »
Unless the fabric is sequinned silk velvet

Pause the thread! I'm trying to picture sequinned silk velvet slacks on most men.

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Betelnut

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #4007 on: January 03, 2012, 02:01:27 PM »
Okay, this has always confused me.  If the date or time for something has been changed, say that originally something was supposed to happen on July 1st 2012 but now it is happening on October 1st 2012, do you say that the event has been "pushed back" or "moved forward"? 

"Forward" seems wrong because "forward" implies "closer" (to me) rather than later, but on the calendar, "forward" could also mean moving the event ahead in time so that would be the correct term to use. 

"Back" could mean moving the date backward, so that would be wrong but "back" sort also means further away, so the date is further away, therefore that is the correct term.

Argh!

For some reason this distinction has always confused me.
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Ms_Cellany

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #4008 on: January 03, 2012, 02:15:53 PM »
Okay, this has always confused me.  If the date or time for something has been changed, say that originally something was supposed to happen on July 1st 2012 but now it is happening on October 1st 2012, do you say that the event has been "pushed back" or "moved forward"? 

"Forward" seems wrong because "forward" implies "closer" (to me) rather than later, but on the calendar, "forward" could also mean moving the event ahead in time so that would be the correct term to use. 

"Back" could mean moving the date backward, so that would be wrong but "back" sort also means further away, so the date is further away, therefore that is the correct term.

Argh!

For some reason this distinction has always confused me.

I use "earlier" and "later," as "it's been moved to an earlier date."
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Betelnut

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #4009 on: January 03, 2012, 02:16:41 PM »
Okay, this has always confused me.  If the date or time for something has been changed, say that originally something was supposed to happen on July 1st 2012 but now it is happening on October 1st 2012, do you say that the event has been "pushed back" or "moved forward"? 

"Forward" seems wrong because "forward" implies "closer" (to me) rather than later, but on the calendar, "forward" could also mean moving the event ahead in time so that would be the correct term to use. 

"Back" could mean moving the date backward, so that would be wrong but "back" sort also means further away, so the date is further away, therefore that is the correct term.

Argh!

For some reason this distinction has always confused me.

I use "earlier" and "later," as "it's been moved to an earlier date."


LOL!  That would be one way to avoid using those terms!
"And thus the whirligig of time brings in his
revenges." -- Feste, Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare.

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Luci45

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #4010 on: January 03, 2012, 02:41:16 PM »
I always avoid by saying "changed to ........." When someone says 'moved up' or 'back' a week, I ask for clarification. This is one of my pet peeves - probably because I'm too clueless to figure it out.

Elisabunny

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #4011 on: January 03, 2012, 03:07:16 PM »
Okay, this has always confused me.  If the date or time for something has been changed, say that originally something was supposed to happen on July 1st 2012 but now it is happening on October 1st 2012, do you say that the event has been "pushed back" or "moved forward"? 

"Forward" seems wrong because "forward" implies "closer" (to me) rather than later, but on the calendar, "forward" could also mean moving the event ahead in time so that would be the correct term to use. 

"Back" could mean moving the date backward, so that would be wrong but "back" sort also means further away, so the date is further away, therefore that is the correct term.

Argh!

For some reason this distinction has always confused me.

The way I have always heard the phrases used is, "pushed back" means the event is later and therefore pushed back away from you, further into the background .  "Moved forward" means sooner or pushed closer to you in how soon you have to deal with it.  If pushed forward far enough, it is right in front of your face and you can't do anything else until you get past it.

Hope that helps!
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Betelnut

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #4012 on: January 03, 2012, 03:11:33 PM »
Okay, this has always confused me.  If the date or time for something has been changed, say that originally something was supposed to happen on July 1st 2012 but now it is happening on October 1st 2012, do you say that the event has been "pushed back" or "moved forward"? 

"Forward" seems wrong because "forward" implies "closer" (to me) rather than later, but on the calendar, "forward" could also mean moving the event ahead in time so that would be the correct term to use. 

"Back" could mean moving the date backward, so that would be wrong but "back" sort also means further away, so the date is further away, therefore that is the correct term.

Argh!

For some reason this distinction has always confused me.

The way I have always heard the phrases used is, "pushed back" means the event is later and therefore pushed back away from you, further into the background .  "Moved forward" means sooner or pushed closer to you in how soon you have to deal with it.  If pushed forward far enough, it is right in front of your face and you can't do anything else until you get past it.

Hope that helps!

Thanks--that does make sense!
"And thus the whirligig of time brings in his
revenges." -- Feste, Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare.

Native Texan, Marylander currently

Virg

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #4013 on: January 03, 2012, 04:13:36 PM »
I wanted to toss in a few words about setting up wifi even though I'm a few pages late, because I've found that it's not hard to grasp once it's been explained.

The main reason to get wifi is because it's wireless.  That sounds pretty self-explanatory, but for people who've never heard of it, it does need to be said.  The wifi device sets up a field around itself that allows devices to communicate with each other and the outside world without running wires all over the house.  We got a wifi point because we got several portable devices (a laptop and iPod) and the wifi allows visitors to connect to our network without plugging in.  But now we use it for quite a few stationary devices as well, like the Wii and one of the computers.  Setting it up to work at all is as simple as plugging it in, connecting it to your existing Internet connection, and giving it a name.  That's very insecure, but it'll work with just that much.

Securing it is a good idea because it's a field.  That means that when devices connect to it, they broadcast information to the wifi device and the wifi broadcasts information back to the devices.  The devices don't broadcast in a line, so anyone in range can "listen in" on the conversation, and that can mean that someone in a nearby house can "see" what user name and password you entered when you logged into your bank account web site.  Therefore, wifi devices come with encryption.  This feature causes the devices to scramble the signals they send and unscramble the information they receive.  If someone listens in but doesn't have the correct password, all they'll "see" is jibberish, so it's safer to send sensitive information around with encrypted wifi.  Every wifi device provides an interface (a built-in mini web site on the device itself) that lets you set up encryption.  artk2002 mentioned MAC address filtering as well.  Every device that connects to the Internet (computers, TVs, iPods, phones, whatever) has a unique address that's built into the device itself, called a MAC address.  You can set up your wireless point to allow only approved MAC addresses to connect, so anyone in range who tries to connect but doesn't have an approved MAC address would be refused even if they guessed your password.  This adds an extra layer of security on top of encryption by keeping unauthorized people off your wifi entirely.

So, the short story is that it's easy to set up and a bit challenging to secure, but it's not anything that the average person would be unable to do.

Virg

guihong

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #4014 on: January 03, 2012, 04:55:02 PM »
Along the path of "forwards and backwards", please settle an argument that's gone on, oh, for 15 years  ::).

Say it's Saturday, and you are telling husband that someone is coming or something is going to happen "next Monday".  To me, "next Monday" means first Sunday, then Monday-two days.  To husband, "next Monday" means Monday after another week has passed.  When is "next Monday"?

I have visions of the "next week/last week/this week" argument between Bugs and Daffy,now.



drebay

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #4015 on: January 03, 2012, 04:57:46 PM »
Along the path of "forwards and backwards", please settle an argument that's gone on, oh, for 15 years  ::).

Say it's Saturday, and you are telling husband that someone is coming or something is going to happen "next Monday".  To me, "next Monday" means first Sunday, then Monday-two days.  To husband, "next Monday" means Monday after another week has passed.  When is "next Monday"?

I have visions of the "next week/last week/this week" argument between Bugs and Daffy,now.

To me, that would be THIS Monday.  NEXT Monday would be in 9 days.

MrsJWine

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #4016 on: January 03, 2012, 05:03:11 PM »
It's funny you ask about this/next Monday. I don't actually know exactly how I define it. I think it might be if it's before or after the coming weekend. Today is Tuesday. If I say "next Monday," I mean the coming one. But if I say "next Thursday," I mean the one nine days from now.


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hobish

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #4017 on: January 03, 2012, 05:53:19 PM »
So I'm traveling today, and was reminded of a sort of stupid question. When you fly, devices like iPods are allowed as long as they are in airplane mode, but not during takeoff or landing. The two most likely theories I can come up with for the reason this rule exists the way it does don't make much sense. One is that they emit some signal that interferes with the plane, but it doesn't make sense to allow them ever if that is the case. I mean, isn't that what the airplane mode is supposed to prevent?

The other theory I have is that it's really for safety reasons -- things are more likely to go wrong during those times. But if that's the reason, why aren't reading and sleeping and other such activities banned as well?

If there's something I'm missing here, I'd love to know what it is. This is something I wonder about every single time I fly, and nobody has ever been able to explain it.

The stated reason is interference with the plane's electronic systems during critical times -- takeoff and landing are the most risky. There's some anecdotal evidence that phones and other devices can cause problems, but other research shows no issues. It's likely a combination of older electronics on planes and certain devices.

Until the research is more conclusive, I think I can live without my smart phone for a few minutes out of each flight -- I've never really understood the people who get so bent out of shape about the ban.

Speaking for me, I just find t preposterous that my little phone can take down the airplane. Really? My phone? An airplane? No one has fixed this? And if my little phone has any chance at all of messing with the plane, why are they letting me bring it on in the first place? Because if it is even remotely possible it seems a dang sight more likely that I have a terrorist plan involving my phone, not my bottle of OJ that was just confiscated. Itís like something out of a bad 80ís sci-fi movie. I just take my soporific, climb on board, and look at the pretty clouds; but I can totally understand why people get upset.
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hobish

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #4018 on: January 03, 2012, 06:00:26 PM »
Wash clothes are unheard of here. A sponge or loofah is lovely but hands and soap do the job just fine.

I read somewhere Ö and I have no idea why it stuck in my head Ö that a lot of European body washes and the like didnít really take off in the US until they started being packaged with some sort of loofah or scrubbie. Itís just one of those things that Americans are more likely to use a sponge or wash cloth than their hands. Now that I have disseminated that information I hope it stops rattling around in my head and makes room for something more useful. Some weights and measures, maybeÖ
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Slartibartfast

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #4019 on: January 03, 2012, 06:07:57 PM »
Along the path of "forwards and backwards", please settle an argument that's gone on, oh, for 15 years  ::).

Say it's Saturday, and you are telling husband that someone is coming or something is going to happen "next Monday".  To me, "next Monday" means first Sunday, then Monday-two days.  To husband, "next Monday" means Monday after another week has passed.  When is "next Monday"?

I have visions of the "next week/last week/this week" argument between Bugs and Daffy,now.

I've always felt that "This Monday" or "This coming Monday" would be 1-7 days in the future, while "Next Monday" would be 8-14 days in the future.  Although if it's Monday when you're saying it, it's better to clarify.