Author Topic: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread  (Read 1037862 times)

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MerryCat

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6000 on: November 05, 2012, 08:40:05 PM »
But doesn't everyone eat unbaked cake batter? Mind you, I only eat the leftovers, I wouldn't just dig into a bowl of batter with a spoon.

Sapphire23

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6001 on: November 05, 2012, 09:10:33 PM »
I do, never gotten sick eating it either.
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Iris

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6002 on: November 05, 2012, 11:38:39 PM »
But doesn't everyone eat unbaked cake batter? Mind you, I only eat the leftovers, I wouldn't just dig into a bowl of batter with a spoon.

Eating leftover cake batter is a perfectly acceptable activity if that's what you enjoy. Eating cake batter before the person who has mixed it is finished using it for its intended purpose is highly inconsiderate and punishable by the Icy Look Of Death, and withdrawal of cake privileges.
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Optimoose Prime

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6003 on: November 06, 2012, 12:17:28 AM »
My mom used to do this with brownie batter.  You would think it was safe once it was in the oven but noooooo.  She would take a spoon to the baking brownies.

ladyknight1

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6004 on: November 06, 2012, 08:46:01 AM »
There would have been an Epic Icy Glare of Doom then!

I bake all of our special occasion cakes and bake for friends and other events. I take my baking very seriously!

Snooks

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6005 on: November 06, 2012, 02:23:56 PM »
If you live outside of the US but are a registered US voter which state does your vote count in?

guihong

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6006 on: November 06, 2012, 02:42:02 PM »
If you live outside of the US but are a registered US voter which state does your vote count in?

Whatever state you were registered in immediately before you left the country.



CakeBeret

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6007 on: November 06, 2012, 02:42:28 PM »
If you live outside of the US but are a registered US voter which state does your vote count in?

The state in which you were last registered, I believe. You have to contact the locality in which you last registered to request an absentee ballot, so your ballot ought to count toward that state.
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Tea Drinker

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6008 on: November 06, 2012, 06:00:23 PM »
If you live outside of the US but are a registered US voter which state does your vote count in?

The state you last lived in, but only for offices that are voted on statewide.

My mother lives in England, and her last U.S. address was in New York. She votes for president, vice president, senator, and the state governor and comptroller. She doesn't get to vote for Congress, state legislature, or anything else that is divided up by districts or counties.

Disclaimer: I don't know, if the person last lived in a state with only one member of Congress, whether their vote would count for that.

This year, New Yorkers displaced by Sandy can vote at any polling place in the state, with a similar restriction: the vote counts for president and senate, and for anything else, it only counts if the person lives in the district they are handed a ballot for. (Someone's vote might thus count for congress but not the state legislature, or vice versa, or for neither.) It's not perfect, but probably the best they can manage under the circumstances.
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LadyJaneinMD

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6009 on: November 07, 2012, 10:01:52 AM »
Why is there so much disparity between cooking time for Chili con carne?

Different people have different interpretations of what "cooked" is when it comes to chili. ;)

Some people consider "heated through" to be cooked. Others believe that a longer cooking time is important for the flavors to meld. My brother in law considers chili cooked for less than four hours to be "raw". I prefer to cook mine for several hours in a crock pot, but I also don't object to cooking it for thirty minutes on the stovetop. So as long as your chili gets hot all the way through, halving your cooking time should be adequate.

I made a recipe from Pioneer Woman's cookbook last weekend, her Burgundy Mushrooms recipe.  It is supposed to be simmered gently for NINE HOURS.  yes, that's right, 9 hours.
I tried it at the 6 hour mark, and it was good.  After 9 hours, it was truly spectacular.   Definitely worth the wait. 

CakeBeret

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6010 on: November 07, 2012, 11:53:02 AM »
I've never been able to get it straight: is it "pour over" or "pore over"? As in "pore over the photos".

I made a recipe from Pioneer Woman's cookbook last weekend, her Burgundy Mushrooms recipe.  It is supposed to be simmered gently for NINE HOURS.  yes, that's right, 9 hours.
I tried it at the 6 hour mark, and it was good.  After 9 hours, it was truly spectacular.   Definitely worth the wait. 

Oh dear sweet saints in heaven above. I am making that. As soon as possible. And again for Thanksgiving. That looks divine.
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Louie_LI

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6011 on: November 07, 2012, 12:00:37 PM »
If you live outside of the US but are a registered US voter which state does your vote count in?

The state you last lived in, but only for offices that are voted on statewide.

My mother lives in England, and her last U.S. address was in New York. She votes for president, vice president, senator, and the state governor and comptroller. She doesn't get to vote for Congress, state legislature, or anything else that is divided up by districts or counties.

Disclaimer: I don't know, if the person last lived in a state with only one member of Congress, whether their vote would count for that.

This year, New Yorkers displaced by Sandy can vote at any polling place in the state, with a similar restriction: the vote counts for president and senate, and for anything else, it only counts if the person lives in the district they are handed a ballot for. (Someone's vote might thus count for congress but not the state legislature, or vice versa, or for neither.) It's not perfect, but probably the best they can manage under the circumstances.

New York allows overseas "Federal" voters to vote for Federal elections only: President/Vice-President, Senator and the house representative from your last district of residence. NY does not allow overseas voters to vote for state-level elections.

This is in great contrast to Washington State, where overseas voters can vote the whole ballot for their last district of residence -- Federal, state, local, referendums, etc.

EmmaJ.

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6012 on: November 07, 2012, 12:52:43 PM »
I've never been able to get it straight: is it "pour over" or "pore over"? As in "pore over the photos".

If you are looking over something - it is "pore".

If you are serving a liquid - you would pour it.


Carotte

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6013 on: November 07, 2012, 02:09:48 PM »
I'm happy to report that the chili turned pretty good :)
it cooked/simmered for about 2 hours and some in the end, and I made do with the spices I had taken with me (didn't cook it in my home) so I'm not actually sure what I put in it or how much, good thing it's a good "wing-it" recipe!

Now my question, why is it so hard to come up with meal ideas? I don't even have to plan it for 4 peoples and a week, it's just two/three meals for two!

KenveeB

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6014 on: November 07, 2012, 02:13:28 PM »
If you live outside of the US but are a registered US voter which state does your vote count in?

The state you last lived in, but only for offices that are voted on statewide.

My mother lives in England, and her last U.S. address was in New York. She votes for president, vice president, senator, and the state governor and comptroller. She doesn't get to vote for Congress, state legislature, or anything else that is divided up by districts or counties.

Disclaimer: I don't know, if the person last lived in a state with only one member of Congress, whether their vote would count for that.

This year, New Yorkers displaced by Sandy can vote at any polling place in the state, with a similar restriction: the vote counts for president and senate, and for anything else, it only counts if the person lives in the district they are handed a ballot for. (Someone's vote might thus count for congress but not the state legislature, or vice versa, or for neither.) It's not perfect, but probably the best they can manage under the circumstances.

New York allows overseas "Federal" voters to vote for Federal elections only: President/Vice-President, Senator and the house representative from your last district of residence. NY does not allow overseas voters to vote for state-level elections.

This is in great contrast to Washington State, where overseas voters can vote the whole ballot for their last district of residence -- Federal, state, local, referendums, etc.

My very first time to vote was absentee. I turned 18 while I was living in the UK. My "permanent address" was my grandmother's house in Texas, so that's where I was registered to vote. I got an absentee ballot that included all the same races as the regular ballots and mailed it back in.