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Author Topic: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread  (Read 2420582 times)

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camlan

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6555 on: January 14, 2013, 06:13:28 AM »
In my previous position, there was a man in district management who wasn't anyone's direct boss, but woe betide anybody in the branches who emailed him using anything other than Arial 12 pt font.

He was a petty man.

In both my jobs, we have to use this font. It is one of the clearest to read, and presents fewest difficulties to those with visual or other issues. Other fonts may look nicer, but Arial is clearer. 12pt is the minimum size we can use.

Arial is a pretty generic font, but it has a lot of good qualities. It's easy to read, especially on a computer monitor, which used to be more important. Higher quality monitors have made it easier to read text on screen for longer periods of time, but in the days of lower resolution monitors, the font you chose made a difference.

For reading print on paper, a serif font is best. Serifs are the tiny, little lines on the ends of letters. Times New Roman is a good example of a serif font. See the little bars on all the ends of the "T"? Those are the serifs. They help move the eye from letter to letter.

A sans-serif font doesn't have those little bars on the ends of the letters. Arial, and Helvetica which is very similar, are sans-serif fonts. They are easier to read on a monitor, because back in the day of older monitors, the serifs didn't show up very well and reading a serif font was just harder because the screen resolution wasn't as good as it is today.

Comic Sans? Well, it's a sans-serif font, hence the "sans" in the name, and works well on-screen. It's a bit childish looking to me, but it has its place. It's an informal style of font, but it's been used in formal documents and the like and that is what strikes some designers as wrong. Great for a printout you are handing to kids, maybe not so much for a hard news website. I'd expect it on a flyer announcing my town's annual Fun Fair at the Children's Museum; I'd be a bit startled if I got a mailing from my insurance company done in Comic Sans.
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


Slartibartfast

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6556 on: January 14, 2013, 10:25:18 AM »

ladyknight1

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6557 on: January 14, 2013, 11:50:57 AM »
In my communications class, we were required to use a sans serif font for all presentations and documents. I tend to stick with that for work and education. My favorites are Century Gothic and Trebuchet. I use Arial for all spreadsheets, as it is easy to read in that format.
“All that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost."
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sourwolf

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6558 on: January 14, 2013, 11:58:00 AM »
Do people genuinely get bent out of shape by other people's choice of font, or s it an internet joke I'm not getting?

Not "bent out of shape" precisely, but people who deal with fonts for a living gripe about font choices the way writers gripe about "50 Shades of Grey" or beer enthusiasts gripe about people who think they know a lot about beer but then rave about Bud Light.  There really are better and worse fonts for particular situations, but it's not always obvious to a layperson.

I deal with fonts for living and while there are fonts that are better suited for certain situations (the use of Copperplate in the most recent Bond movie was a bit baffling) the whole "Comic Sans was invented by the Anti-Christ" thing mostly seems like snobbery to me, in the style of beer snobs who can't let others enjoy their Bud Light. You probably shouldn't use Comic Sans on a grave stone but they seem more interested in just griping than from saving the world from it.

Honestly?  It looks amateurish to me.  I get this "in crayon with a reversed R" vibe from it.  Others may not agree... I also don't like yellow cars, some people seem to think sports cars belong in yellow.

I'm not saying that Comic Sans is pretty or should be used as widely as it is (it does have a pretty interesting history and I find it fascinating that it works better with dyslexics than some more conventional fonts) but much of the reaction against it looks like pure snobbery. It won't make the people who use it stop but will make the complainers feel like they're better designers, so delicate that the mere existance of Comic Sans in this world offends them.

Wow, I didn't know that. I'm mildly dyslexic and I wonder if that has something to do with the fact that I like Comic Sans so much.  I do find it very easy to read but I figured that was because the letters seem to be spaced out a bit more/slightly larger than say Times New Roman 12.

Ms_Cellany

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6559 on: January 14, 2013, 12:21:27 PM »
I have a book from the early eighties called Color Me Beautiful and I identified myself as a winter using its guidelines.  I got such impressive results from it that I have continued to live by it ever since. 


I had the same book. I forget what "season" I was, but the book advised jewel tones on me, no pure white.  It works great!
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Hmmmmm

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6560 on: January 14, 2013, 01:31:53 PM »
I have a book from the early eighties called Color Me Beautiful and I identified myself as a winter using its guidelines.  I got such impressive results from it that I have continued to live by it ever since. 


I had the same book. I forget what "season" I was, but the book advised jewel tones on me, no pure white.  It works great!

I graduated HS in the early 80s.  One of my friends mom was a Color Me Beautiful consultant and she hosted a party for a few of us graduates and did a color analysis, gave us a swatch book with the colors we should wear, and a little bag of make up samples in "our" colors.  We all laughed a little about it, but in the back of my mind, I've always known I was a summer and needed to stick with cool tones.  I had never thought of it in relation to hair color though until I was in my 30s and learned the reason I hated a new highlight job was because they had put in warm tones into my hair. 

Outdoor Girl

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6561 on: January 14, 2013, 01:38:06 PM »
Summer and Winter recommend cool tones; Spring and Fall recommend warm tones.  When I had my colours done, it was with a slightly different system that refered to the sun:  Sunrise, sunlight, sunset.  Sunrise would be equivalent to Spring - warm but pale tones.  Sunset would be equivalent to Fall - warm but muted tones and sunlight was kind of a combination of Winter and Summer.  I knew I was a summer because I look absolutely horrible in black.  I didn't realize until I wore a black sweater and black skirt to a Christmas party.  Then saw pictures of myself afterwards.  It looked like it was my first day out of bed after being deathly ill for a week.  I'm surprised people weren't calling me 'Casper'.   :D
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jpcher

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6562 on: January 14, 2013, 02:52:29 PM »
Silly question for those that frequently dye their hair . . . I mean like drastically change the color, or put in highlights, or have purple hair one month, black the next month . . .

What color hair do you put on your drivers license/passport info?


DD#2 renewed her passport today and she wrote down Blond for hair color -- her natural color. Right now her hair is more red/brown with some blond highlights, so blond doesn't really describe the hair color that's on the photo.

Mental Magpie

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6563 on: January 14, 2013, 02:56:40 PM »
Silly question for those that frequently dye their hair . . . I mean like drastically change the color, or put in highlights, or have purple hair one month, black the next month . . .

What color hair do you put on your drivers license/passport info?


DD#2 renewed her passport today and she wrote down Blond for hair color -- her natural color. Right now her hair is more red/brown with some blond highlights, so blond doesn't really describe the hair color that's on the photo.

I put my natural hair color every single time: a passport and two driver's licenses.

Piratelvr1121

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6564 on: January 14, 2013, 03:20:55 PM »
Summer and Winter recommend cool tones; Spring and Fall recommend warm tones.  When I had my colours done, it was with a slightly different system that refered to the sun:  Sunrise, sunlight, sunset.  Sunrise would be equivalent to Spring - warm but pale tones.  Sunset would be equivalent to Fall - warm but muted tones and sunlight was kind of a combination of Winter and Summer.  I knew I was a summer because I look absolutely horrible in black.  I didn't realize until I wore a black sweater and black skirt to a Christmas party.  Then saw pictures of myself afterwards.  It looked like it was my first day out of bed after being deathly ill for a week.  I'm surprised people weren't calling me 'Casper'.   :D

I once colored my hair a jet black and well let's just say when I switched to auburn I stopped getting asked if I was feeling alright.
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Tea Drinker

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6565 on: January 14, 2013, 04:03:11 PM »
I read several years ago that tests/surveys in the U.S. find that serif fonts are easier to read, and tests/surveys in Europe find that sans serif ones are easier. A lot of what makes fonts easy to read is familiarity, and Americans see more serif type, and Europeans see more sans serif.

Along similar lines, some people deliberately use Century Schoolbook in documents--handbooks, brochures, etc.--intended for teachers, again because of the familiarity.
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sunnygirl

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6566 on: January 14, 2013, 08:01:52 PM »
Do people genuinely get bent out of shape by other people's choice of font, or s it an internet joke I'm not getting?

Not "bent out of shape" precisely, but people who deal with fonts for a living gripe about font choices the way writers gripe about "50 Shades of Grey" or beer enthusiasts gripe about people who think they know a lot about beer but then rave about Bud Light.  There really are better and worse fonts for particular situations, but it's not always obvious to a layperson.

I deal with fonts for living and while there are fonts that are better suited for certain situations (the use of Copperplate in the most recent Bond movie was a bit baffling) the whole "Comic Sans was invented by the Anti-Christ" thing mostly seems like snobbery to me, in the style of beer snobs who can't let others enjoy their Bud Light. You probably shouldn't use Comic Sans on a grave stone but they seem more interested in just griping than from saving the world from it.

Funny you should mention that...

VorFemme

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6567 on: January 14, 2013, 09:39:02 PM »
I got color typed by a friend of a friend - she was visiting Phoenix from Chicago and wanted a bit of extra spending money - I got typed and custom makeup for the military ball that year (Barry Goldwater was supposed to be the speaker - he'd run for President when I was in second grade, but was not elected - instead we had a retired pilot who ended up doing a lot more stuff to be famous for over the next twenty years before he passed away....naming no names....).  But it was a REALLY BIG DEAL event for me and I was happy to fork over some money for the only time I had my makeup professionally done.

I am a Winter - with pale skin, medium eyes, and dark hair - and I already knew that I looked better in black or white than I did in ivory (Mom talked me into an ivory wedding gown - fortunately at the time, my mess dress was black, white, and silver - I looked GOOD in those colors). 

I found that a dark auburn looked good - and I could go to a few of the darker autumn colors (DD is a natural red-blonde) - with her nearyby - me with "reddish" hair looked natural (I have red highlights, but my natural color is such a dark, dark auburn that they don't show much). 

I have found ONE shade of orange that looks good on me (and I haven't seen it in the stores in decades - it was an almost flourescent orange - with an almost blue undertone) - but it got me a lot of compliments when I wore that dress!
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Mental Magpie

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6568 on: January 14, 2013, 09:52:59 PM »
I never knew about the color thing until the latter part of high school (and only then had I heard about it briefly in passing), but I always knew that silver looks better on me as do deep greens and blues.  I also wear a lot (read: A LOT) of black...and it helped that those tended to be my favorite colors, too.  FWIW, I have olive skin, dark brown hair, and chocolate brown eyes.

Despite how weird/unusual this color thing sounds on the onset, I can say it makes a lot of sense.

Ereine

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6569 on: January 15, 2013, 12:25:47 AM »
Do people genuinely get bent out of shape by other people's choice of font, or s it an internet joke I'm not getting?

Not "bent out of shape" precisely, but people who deal with fonts for a living gripe about font choices the way writers gripe about "50 Shades of Grey" or beer enthusiasts gripe about people who think they know a lot about beer but then rave about Bud Light.  There really are better and worse fonts for particular situations, but it's not always obvious to a layperson.

I deal with fonts for living and while there are fonts that are better suited for certain situations (the use of Copperplate in the most recent Bond movie was a bit baffling) the whole "Comic Sans was invented by the Anti-Christ" thing mostly seems like snobbery to me, in the style of beer snobs who can't let others enjoy their Bud Light. You probably shouldn't use Comic Sans on a grave stone but they seem more interested in just griping than from saving the world from it.

Funny you should mention that...

I got the grave stone example from the book Just My Type, maybe they were talking about that same one. It is an interesting book by the way, or at least the beginning is, I haven't made it farther yet. There's one chapter on Comic Sans and how it came to be.