Author Topic: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread  (Read 843169 times)

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Bluenomi

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6825 on: February 10, 2013, 10:34:36 PM »
Uni trained me well for passwords. You were given a password for the IT nextwork that couldn't be changed and was comprised of 6 random letters. I still use those letter with different variations (swap them around, add letters or numbers) Very handy!

JoW

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6826 on: February 10, 2013, 11:23:53 PM »
Definately change your password.  Make it very complicated.  Make it so complicated you have to write it on scrap paper and hide it under your monitor.  If you are feeling ambitious change the passwords for all of your accounts.

Do not write it down and store it under your monitor; that's a good way for it to get hacked if anyone breaks into your house.

.........

I didn't think of your house being broken into. 

You could write it on paper and store it in a more secure location.  I once saw a female police officer on TV suggesting you store valuables in a box of lady product under the bathroom sink.  According to her most thieves are men and most men won't look there.  Or maybe in the freezer because no one keeps paper in the freezer.   

Softly Spoken

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6827 on: February 11, 2013, 02:12:46 AM »
Definately change your password.  Make it very complicated.  Make it so complicated you have to write it on scrap paper and hide it under your monitor.  If you are feeling ambitious change the passwords for all of your accounts.

Do not write it down and store it under your monitor; that's a good way for it to get hacked if anyone breaks into your house.

.........

I didn't think of your house being broken into. 

You could write it on paper and store it in a more secure location.  I once saw a female police officer on TV suggesting you store valuables in a box of lady product under the bathroom sink.  According to her most thieves are men and most men won't look there. Or maybe in the freezer because no one keeps paper in the freezer.   

The bolded above actually inspires a stupid question I've often thought to myself when watching television - how productive are security advisories like this? Not the advice itself, but the fact that it is given on television - which I'm sure quite a few criminal types own or at least have access to.

If Mrs. Smith starts hiding her money in the 'feminine hygiene' box under the sink because "I saw it on CSI"  ::), what's to stop Barry the Burglar from checking that box because he saw the same episode?
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Iris

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6828 on: February 11, 2013, 04:15:15 AM »
Definately change your password.  Make it very complicated.  Make it so complicated you have to write it on scrap paper and hide it under your monitor.  If you are feeling ambitious change the passwords for all of your accounts.

Do not write it down and store it under your monitor; that's a good way for it to get hacked if anyone breaks into your house.

.........

I didn't think of your house being broken into. 

You could write it on paper and store it in a more secure location.  I once saw a female police officer on TV suggesting you store valuables in a box of lady product under the bathroom sink.  According to her most thieves are men and most men won't look there. Or maybe in the freezer because no one keeps paper in the freezer.   

The bolded above actually inspires a stupid question I've often thought to myself when watching television - how productive are security advisories like this? Not the advice itself, but the fact that it is given on television - which I'm sure quite a few criminal types own or at least have access to.

If Mrs. Smith starts hiding her money in the 'feminine hygiene' box under the sink because "I saw it on CSI"  ::), what's to stop Barry the Burglar from checking that box because he saw the same episode?

Well, I think it comes down to practicality. Many thieves are just after some quick cash and are going to snatch things that are obviously of value and putting something in an out of the way place will work. Sheer probability would suggest that out of all of the possible hiding places recommended by all of the shows on telly you'd have to be pretty unlucky to have much crossover.

OTOH I had a friend whose parents were hit by professional thieves (at least that what the police told them had happened) who picked a time when they were away and went through the *whole house* - emptied out canisters in the kitchen, went through every drawer, the whole 9 yards. That was about 30 years ago so no CSI then!
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ladyknight1

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6829 on: February 11, 2013, 09:28:43 AM »
One of my closest friends was burglarized two years ago. The burglar stole her work-issued laptop, her jar of coins, some of her underwear, their xbox, and various DVD's. He smashed through their sliding glass door to gain entrance. He also spread the remaining underwear throughout the house.

He was never caught and the laptop never recovered.

Twik

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6830 on: February 11, 2013, 09:34:36 AM »
Okay, stupid question regarding the Messiah/Hallelujah chorus and standing -- why do people stand up? What is the reasoning behind the protocol?

This question can be applied to the (US) national anthem . . . or the recitation of the pledge to the flag.

Is standing up more respectful? Why?

During Hellelujah - because supposedly the first time King George heard it performed he stood.  No one knows why though - some say its because its about Christ so it was out of respect, while some say its because he thought it was intermission and he had to pee, but either way, when the King stands, everyone stands.  And so it became a tradition to stand.  Prior to that story though, no one stood.

As for the anthem or pledge, I think its just a respect thing, much like standing to greet someone, or standing attention, etc - its just more formal to stand.

Yes, standing up is more respectful.

There is a whole book of etiquette regarding that that's not much in use any more. For example, if you and your DH were eating in a restaurant, and a female friend dropped by to chat, your DH would have to stand the entire time, out of respect.
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Virg

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6831 on: February 11, 2013, 11:34:20 AM »
GreenHall wrote:

"So based on the number of bounce backs in my in-box, plus my copy for each of my email addresses, because I'm in my address book, I think one of my yahoo accounts sent out a spam today.   I was able to get into my account, so it's not completely hijacked."

You should change your email password, but that might not entirely fix the problem because most harvesters will use the addresses in your address book and your email address as the sender since it's valid.

For changing passwords, I'll suggest my usual pattern for them.  Invent a reasonable 8 character base.  It's a good idea to use mixed case, use only letters and numbers for the times when a password isn't allowed to use punctuation and don't make it a word that you'll find in a dictionary (for example, a good base for me might be AbCdVirg).  Next, come up with two non-letter, non-number characters like %^ or whatever.  Then, to build a password, use your base, then the two characters, then the name of whatever you're using the password for.  So, you can come up with a password like AbCdVirg%^etiquettehell for here, which is tough for a computer or person to guess, but all you need to remember is your base and characters, and the rest you'll recall from where you're trying to log in.  For sites that don't allow them, you can skip the characters, and if there's a size limit on the password, just use the full pattern and then truncate it to the maximum allowed length.  To change it, change your base only and it's still very tough to guess, plus you can write a list of all the bases you've ever used on a card in your wallet for all it matters, since your base alone won't unlock anything.

Luci45 wrote:

"I have a method to print them on a spreadsheet with the numbers coded, and I want my kids to be sure to be able to get into my accounts when the time comes."

If you're worried about access to your accounts in the case of your incapacity, then write down your pattern and where your accounts are, and put them in your safe deposit box.  If you don't have a safe deposit box, then put it all on an encrypted thumb drive (see http://www.truecrypt.org for my favorite program, because you can put the program on the drive with the file so you never have to worry about not being able to find the program to decrypt it) and give it to your kids or whoever's likely to end up as their guardian if they're too young themselves.  Put the password to that thumb drive in your will, assuming you don't just want to give it to them directly, and even if someone breaks in and steals your will they won't have the drive itself.

Virg

LadyJaneinMD

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6832 on: February 12, 2013, 11:30:28 AM »
Definately change your password.  Make it very complicated.  Make it so complicated you have to write it on scrap paper and hide it under your monitor.  If you are feeling ambitious change the passwords for all of your accounts.

Do not write it down and store it under your monitor; that's a good way for it to get hacked if anyone breaks into your house.

.........

I didn't think of your house being broken into. 

You could write it on paper and store it in a more secure location.  I once saw a female police officer on TV suggesting you store valuables in a box of lady product under the bathroom sink.  According to her most thieves are men and most men won't look there.  Or maybe in the freezer because no one keeps paper in the freezer.   

I always kept a slip of paper in my wallet with the passwords on it.   It's very safe.  The paper doesn't say anything about what the strange list of numbers and letters are - it's just a small list. 
Yeah, someone could try them on everything over and over, but that's work. 

For valuables...for a short time, I kept a pile of cash in my apartment, and one of my friends suggested that I double-bag it in ziploc baggies, and bury it at the bottom of the litter box.  We called it the Bank of [cat's name].    I also keep valuables buried in my fabric 'wall'.   You'd have to pull every piece out to find the money, and yes, there is a LOT of fabric - hence the name Fabric Wall.

Mental Magpie

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6833 on: February 12, 2013, 12:05:08 PM »
Definately change your password.  Make it very complicated.  Make it so complicated you have to write it on scrap paper and hide it under your monitor.  If you are feeling ambitious change the passwords for all of your accounts.

Do not write it down and store it under your monitor; that's a good way for it to get hacked if anyone breaks into your house.

.........

I didn't think of your house being broken into. 

You could write it on paper and store it in a more secure location.  I once saw a female police officer on TV suggesting you store valuables in a box of lady product under the bathroom sink.  According to her most thieves are men and most men won't look there.  Or maybe in the freezer because no one keeps paper in the freezer.   

I always kept a slip of paper in my wallet with the passwords on it.   It's very safe.  The paper doesn't say anything about what the strange list of numbers and letters are - it's just a small list. 
Yeah, someone could try them on everything over and over, but that's work. 

For valuables...for a short time, I kept a pile of cash in my apartment, and one of my friends suggested that I double-bag it in ziploc baggies, and bury it at the bottom of the litter box.  We called it the Bank of [cat's name].    I also keep valuables buried in my fabric 'wall'.   You'd have to pull every piece out to find the money, and yes, there is a LOT of fabric - hence the name Fabric Wall.

I don't think that list is very safe at all, if it was an odd string of letters and numbers I would guess it a password/code very quickly; but to each his own.
The problem with choosing the lesser of two evils is that you're still choosing evil.

LadyJaneinMD

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6834 on: February 12, 2013, 12:20:06 PM »
Definately change your password.  Make it very complicated.  Make it so complicated you have to write it on scrap paper and hide it under your monitor.  If you are feeling ambitious change the passwords for all of your accounts.

Do not write it down and store it under your monitor; that's a good way for it to get hacked if anyone breaks into your house.

.........

I didn't think of your house being broken into. 

You could write it on paper and store it in a more secure location.  I once saw a female police officer on TV suggesting you store valuables in a box of lady product under the bathroom sink.  According to her most thieves are men and most men won't look there.  Or maybe in the freezer because no one keeps paper in the freezer.   

I always kept a slip of paper in my wallet with the passwords on it.   It's very safe.  The paper doesn't say anything about what the strange list of numbers and letters are - it's just a small list. 
Yeah, someone could try them on everything over and over, but that's work. 

For valuables...for a short time, I kept a pile of cash in my apartment, and one of my friends suggested that I double-bag it in ziploc baggies, and bury it at the bottom of the litter box.  We called it the Bank of [cat's name].    I also keep valuables buried in my fabric 'wall'.   You'd have to pull every piece out to find the money, and yes, there is a LOT of fabric - hence the name Fabric Wall.

I don't think that list is very safe at all, if it was an odd string of letters and numbers I would guess it a password/code very quickly; but to each his own.

Of course, but a password to WHAT?   WHERE?  It doesn't say what account, what computer system, or even what username it is!

Outdoor Girl

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6835 on: February 12, 2013, 12:57:51 PM »
I have a hard time remembering my PIN number for all my various cards.  And some of them can't be changed.  I ended up inputing them into my cell to make them look like local phone numbers and used a name that would remind me what those numbers are.  So if I used Acme Bank, the name in my phone would be Amy B, as a made up example.
I have CDO.  It is like OCD but with the letters in alphabetical order, as they should be.
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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6836 on: February 12, 2013, 12:59:49 PM »
The list may be safe enough if you lose the wallet and a stranger picks it up or if it is stolen. However, if someone closer to you (coworker, child, friend, etc) snoops around and finds the list, they may have a good idea of the sites you frequent and your user names, specially email. Since it isn't a long list, they may be snoopy enough to try them all out to get access to your email and Facebook accounts.

Mental Magpie

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6837 on: February 12, 2013, 01:01:30 PM »
Not to mention the software that will just run through them all to every webpage you've visited and the usernames that have been inputted repeatedly.
The problem with choosing the lesser of two evils is that you're still choosing evil.

Elfmama

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6838 on: February 12, 2013, 01:11:58 PM »
I always kept a slip of paper in my wallet with the passwords on it.   It's very safe.  The paper doesn't say anything about what the strange list of numbers and letters are - it's just a small list. 
Yeah, someone could try them on everything over and over, but that's work. 

For valuables...for a short time, I kept a pile of cash in my apartment, and one of my friends suggested that I double-bag it in ziploc baggies, and bury it at the bottom of the litter box.  We called it the Bank of [cat's name].    I also keep valuables buried in my fabric 'wall'.   You'd have to pull every piece out to find the money, and yes, there is a LOT of fabric - hence the name Fabric Wall.

I don't think that list is very safe at all, if it was an odd string of letters and numbers I would guess it a password/code very quickly; but to each his own.
I keep my various PINs and account numbers in my cellphone, disguised as phone numbers.  *I* know that "Aunt Mary" at 444-427-1234 isn't a real phone number, since I don't have an Aunt Mary, but a stranger who steals my phone/wallet won't know that.
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Mental Magpie

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #6839 on: February 12, 2013, 01:15:58 PM »
I always kept a slip of paper in my wallet with the passwords on it.   It's very safe.  The paper doesn't say anything about what the strange list of numbers and letters are - it's just a small list. 
Yeah, someone could try them on everything over and over, but that's work. 

For valuables...for a short time, I kept a pile of cash in my apartment, and one of my friends suggested that I double-bag it in ziploc baggies, and bury it at the bottom of the litter box.  We called it the Bank of [cat's name].    I also keep valuables buried in my fabric 'wall'.   You'd have to pull every piece out to find the money, and yes, there is a LOT of fabric - hence the name Fabric Wall.

I don't think that list is very safe at all, if it was an odd string of letters and numbers I would guess it a password/code very quickly; but to each his own.
I keep my various PINs and account numbers in my cellphone, disguised as phone numbers.  *I* know that "Aunt Mary" at 444-427-1234 isn't a real phone number, since I don't have an Aunt Mary, but a stranger who steals my phone/wallet won't know that.

Right, but that's not written on a piece of paper in a wallet alongside other such strings.

If LadyJaneinMD feels safe with it, that's fine; I just wouldn't.
The problem with choosing the lesser of two evils is that you're still choosing evil.