Author Topic: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread  (Read 1001851 times)

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Ereine

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #7740 on: June 08, 2013, 10:45:34 AM »
Can I freeze this type of cookies? Or keep them in a container for a week? I need them the next Sunday but it would save me a lot of time if I could bake them tomorrow.

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #7741 on: June 08, 2013, 12:48:01 PM »
I think they would be fine for a week in good quality storage ware, like Tupperware.  I'm surprised how little fat there is in them!

Freezing would probably be OK, too, but you'd have to be careful thawing them so that they don't get any moisture on them.  Which would be a lot more work - you'd have to unpack them, lay them out on cooling racks or cookie sheets to thaw then re-pack them.
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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #7742 on: June 08, 2013, 04:25:50 PM »
It is worth looking at your toothpaste if you buy it from dollar stores or other discount outlets - there have been several instances of discount stores getting toothpaste intended for other countries.  Which wouldn't matter, except that toothpaste in some countries (like South Africa, I believe) has significantly more fluoride than American toothpaste does - mostly because we get fluoride from our water and they don't.  Too much fluoride can cause problems, so it's worth checking to make sure your toothpaste is made for America (or another country with fluoride in the water).
Its MUCH worse than that.  Dollar store toothpaste with a counterfit name-brand label, sold in the US a few years ago, was found to contain ethylene glycol.  Ethylene glycol is used as antifreeze.  It taste sweet and is very toxic. 

Do not buy toothpaste from the dollar store.  Heck, I wouldn't buy any food, medicine, or cosmetic at the dollar store.

Has nothing to do with the dollar store. Colgate was found to have it.  Turns out it came from China.
It was COUNTERFIT Colgate toothpaste.  The label said Colgate, but it was not made by Colgate or any company associated with Colgate.  I don't remember where it was made, but China sounds reasonable. It was sold in stores where every item costs $1. 

My point is, for anything that goes inside you - drugs or food - skip the products sold at that type of store.  For things used on your skin - soap, shampoo, and cosmetics - be careful what you buy.  And for other products, remember, sometimes you get what you pay for.  I've gotten great deals at the Dollar Store.  I've also gotten head phones that leaked and cleaning products so dilute they didn't work.

Diane AKA Traska

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #7743 on: June 08, 2013, 06:28:00 PM »
It is worth looking at your toothpaste if you buy it from dollar stores or other discount outlets - there have been several instances of discount stores getting toothpaste intended for other countries.  Which wouldn't matter, except that toothpaste in some countries (like South Africa, I believe) has significantly more fluoride than American toothpaste does - mostly because we get fluoride from our water and they don't.  Too much fluoride can cause problems, so it's worth checking to make sure your toothpaste is made for America (or another country with fluoride in the water).
Its MUCH worse than that.  Dollar store toothpaste with a counterfit name-brand label, sold in the US a few years ago, was found to contain ethylene glycol.  Ethylene glycol is used as antifreeze.  It taste sweet and is very toxic. 

Do not buy toothpaste from the dollar store.  Heck, I wouldn't buy any food, medicine, or cosmetic at the dollar store.

Has nothing to do with the dollar store. Colgate was found to have it.  Turns out it came from China.
It was COUNTERFIT Colgate toothpaste.  The label said Colgate, but it was not made by Colgate or any company associated with Colgate.  I don't remember where it was made, but China sounds reasonable. It was sold in stores where every item costs $1. 

My point is, for anything that goes inside you - drugs or food - skip the products sold at that type of store.  For things used on your skin - soap, shampoo, and cosmetics - be careful what you buy.  And for other products, remember, sometimes you get what you pay for.  I've gotten great deals at the Dollar Store.  I've also gotten head phones that leaked and cleaning products so dilute they didn't work.

And I have, for years now, gotten all of my OTC painkillers (Naproxen Sodium, Acetaminophen, Ibuprofin) from dollar stores.  And there's one chain in particular that makes a cola I find superior to brand name.  Dollar stores aren't inherently nation-wide chains of festering death, like a Captain Planet villain.
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Slartibartfast

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #7744 on: June 08, 2013, 08:50:52 PM »
It is worth looking at your toothpaste if you buy it from dollar stores or other discount outlets - there have been several instances of discount stores getting toothpaste intended for other countries.  Which wouldn't matter, except that toothpaste in some countries (like South Africa, I believe) has significantly more fluoride than American toothpaste does - mostly because we get fluoride from our water and they don't.  Too much fluoride can cause problems, so it's worth checking to make sure your toothpaste is made for America (or another country with fluoride in the water).
Its MUCH worse than that.  Dollar store toothpaste with a counterfit name-brand label, sold in the US a few years ago, was found to contain ethylene glycol.  Ethylene glycol is used as antifreeze.  It taste sweet and is very toxic. 

Do not buy toothpaste from the dollar store.  Heck, I wouldn't buy any food, medicine, or cosmetic at the dollar store.

Has nothing to do with the dollar store. Colgate was found to have it.  Turns out it came from China.
It was COUNTERFIT Colgate toothpaste.  The label said Colgate, but it was not made by Colgate or any company associated with Colgate.  I don't remember where it was made, but China sounds reasonable. It was sold in stores where every item costs $1. 

My point is, for anything that goes inside you - drugs or food - skip the products sold at that type of store.  For things used on your skin - soap, shampoo, and cosmetics - be careful what you buy.  And for other products, remember, sometimes you get what you pay for.  I've gotten great deals at the Dollar Store.  I've also gotten head phones that leaked and cleaning products so dilute they didn't work.

And I have, for years now, gotten all of my OTC painkillers (Naproxen Sodium, Acetaminophen, Ibuprofin) from dollar stores.  And there's one chain in particular that makes a cola I find superior to brand name.  Dollar stores aren't inherently nation-wide chains of festering death, like a Captain Planet villain.

Oh, that's definitely true - but because their supply chain for many products is essentially built around scavenging deals when available (as opposed to stores like Wal-Mart and Target which contract for recurring orders of specific amounts of product), they vary a lot more by store than most other types of stores do.  And an unscrupulous or uninformed manager/buyer may choose to offer products in their store which wouldn't have made the cut in other stores - sometimes it's for obvious reasons, like out-of-season merchandise or clear factory seconds, but sometimes it's because the source of the item is international.  And since hygiene products aren't held to as strict a standard as food products are in the US, hygiene products made for other countries' markets may have qualities which aren't what US buyers would expect (such as extra fluoride).

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #7745 on: June 08, 2013, 08:56:37 PM »
Can I freeze this type of cookies? Or keep them in a container for a week? I need them the next Sunday but it would save me a lot of time if I could bake them tomorrow.
Are they supposed to be soft, chewy, or crisp?  Soft/chewy cookies are best in the freezer.  Crisp cookies tend to dry out. 
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JoW

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #7746 on: June 08, 2013, 09:56:33 PM »
And I have, for years now, gotten all of my OTC painkillers (Naproxen Sodium, Acetaminophen, Ibuprofin) from dollar stores.  And there's one chain in particular that makes a cola I find superior to brand name.  Dollar stores aren't inherently nation-wide chains of festering death, like a Captain Planet villain.

Oh, that's definitely true - but because their supply chain for many products is essentially built around scavenging deals when available (as opposed to stores like Wal-Mart and Target which contract for recurring orders of specific amounts of product), they vary a lot more by store than most other types of stores do.  And an unscrupulous or uninformed manager/buyer may choose to offer products in their store which wouldn't have made the cut in other stores - sometimes it's for obvious reasons, like out-of-season merchandise or clear factory seconds, but sometimes it's because the source of the item is international.  And since hygiene products aren't held to as strict a standard as food products are in the US, hygiene products made for other countries' markets may have qualities which aren't what US buyers would expect (such as extra fluoride).
Slartibartfast is right.  The supply chain for dollar stores is erratic at best.  Counterfit manufacturing of pharmaceuticals is rampant.  I know I can't stop you from buying medicines at a dollar store, but I'll never buy mine there.  The same goes for toothpaste and for food.

BTW - I work for a major pharmaceutical manufacturing firm.  Fighting counterfit medicines is an issue for the industry. 

Ereine

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #7747 on: June 08, 2013, 11:47:04 PM »
Can I freeze this type of cookies? Or keep them in a container for a week? I need them the next Sunday but it would save me a lot of time if I could bake them tomorrow.
Are they supposed to be soft, chewy, or crisp?  Soft/chewy cookies are best in the freezer.  Crisp cookies tend to dry out.

They're pretty crisp. I think that I'll just make them next week, it seems easiest. They're very delicious, or at least were the one time I've tried them.

VorFemme

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #7748 on: June 09, 2013, 01:24:00 AM »
When a male Jewish infant is ritually circumcised, what do they do with the foreskin? Is there a further ritual regarding it?  I'm assuming that a non-ritual hospital circumcision, it's disposed of as medical waste, probably incinerated.  But the authorities would frown, I think, on just tossing it in the wastebasket.

According to my DH (who is a biochemist and has worked in research), some foreskins are sold for medical research - basically you grow cells in culture on them, or can use them as a "control" healthy cell (he was working on the link between HPV and cervical cancer).  They are *very* expensive and so he presumes only a few of them "reach market" - it would only be those removed in hospitals as synagogues etc would be non-sterile and could therefore contaminate the cell.

I understand that some of the really conservative congregations might save the removed tissue, as there is a perception that it will be needed when the person dies to make the body "complete" for religious reasons.  I am not Jewish, so I don't remember/know where I got that information or if it has any truth to it.  I think it was in "background information" in a story - the author could have made it up out of whole cloth to make the story come out the way that he wanted it.

On the other hand, people save the umbilical cord, baby teeth, and hair from the first haircut - and there have been  cases that used DNA extracted from the cord or the teeth to ID a missing person years later. 

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #7749 on: June 09, 2013, 10:50:23 PM »
And I have, for years now, gotten all of my OTC painkillers (Naproxen Sodium, Acetaminophen, Ibuprofin) from dollar stores.  And there's one chain in particular that makes a cola I find superior to brand name.  Dollar stores aren't inherently nation-wide chains of festering death, like a Captain Planet villain.

Oh, that's definitely true - but because their supply chain for many products is essentially built around scavenging deals when available (as opposed to stores like Wal-Mart and Target which contract for recurring orders of specific amounts of product), they vary a lot more by store than most other types of stores do.  And an unscrupulous or uninformed manager/buyer may choose to offer products in their store which wouldn't have made the cut in other stores - sometimes it's for obvious reasons, like out-of-season merchandise or clear factory seconds, but sometimes it's because the source of the item is international.  And since hygiene products aren't held to as strict a standard as food products are in the US, hygiene products made for other countries' markets may have qualities which aren't what US buyers would expect (such as extra fluoride).
Slartibartfast is right.  The supply chain for dollar stores is erratic at best.  Counterfit manufacturing of pharmaceuticals is rampant.  I know I can't stop you from buying medicines at a dollar store, but I'll never buy mine there.  The same goes for toothpaste and for food.

BTW - I work for a major pharmaceutical manufacturing firm.  Fighting counterfit medicines is an issue for the industry.

Interesting. I work in supply chain management, particularly in the pharmaceutical industry. I work for a software vendor and have many of the manufacturers and distributors for customers.

JoW and Slartibartfast are very right. The supply chain for pharmaceuticals is very vulnerable to counterfeits and grey-market stuff. It's been estimated that 10% of the pharmaceuticals sold worldwide are counterfeit. That includes things like AIDS drugs where the active ingredient was replaced by antidepressants. There was a recently revealed scandal (although known in the industry for years) of a manufacturer (Ranbaxy) faking research reports and manufacturing worthless product.

Be very, very wary of online pharmacies. Many of the ones claiming to be from Canada are really based in other parts of the world -- parts with little or no regulation on the supply chain.

Report on counterfeit Avastin, a cancer drug, imported into the US.

Sorry to be alarmist, but those of us working in this area are very aware of how bad thigs can be.
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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #7750 on: June 09, 2013, 11:39:31 PM »
The scary thing is that while counterfeit medicines are a real risk, getting the actual brand-name ones isn't always safer. At this point I am buying only generic ibuprofen, because of a series of recalls on the brand-name products.
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Sheila Take a Bow

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #7751 on: June 10, 2013, 04:42:20 PM »
I'm thinking of making a craft table for myself by putting a piece of MDF (or wood) on top of some short shelving units.  Can I go to the Home Depot and ask for a piece of MDF (or wood) to be cut to a certain size?

And would wood be easier to work with than MDF?
« Last Edit: June 10, 2013, 04:43:54 PM by Sheila Take a Bow »

Gwywnnydd

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #7752 on: June 10, 2013, 04:44:14 PM »
I'm thinking of making a craft table for myself by putting a piece of MDF on top of some short shelving units.  Can I go to the Home Depot and ask for a piece of MDF to be cut to a certain size?

Yes. They may have you buy the whole sheet, but they can cut it there in the store. I have done that several times when I don't have access to a table saw.

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #7753 on: June 10, 2013, 04:59:15 PM »
I'm thinking of making a craft table for myself by putting a piece of MDF (or wood) on top of some short shelving units.  Can I go to the Home Depot and ask for a piece of MDF (or wood) to be cut to a certain size?

Absolutely. Just come prepared with your measurements ready (such as written down). IME the first cut is free and each additional cut is a nominal fee (no more then a $1). You can take all your scrap with you, or you can chuck in the scrap bin.

The scrap bin is a great place to check when you are building a shelf or something and aren't too picky on the size - any approximate will do. The scraps are already cut and significantly cheaper then a whole board.

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #7754 on: June 10, 2013, 05:35:41 PM »
I've bought the folding table legs before and attached them to a 1/4 or 1/2 sheet of plywood, good side up, of course.  You can buy 1/4 or 1/2 sheets already cut for less than the cost of a whole sheet.  But if you want more than one table, it would be cheaper to buy the whole sheet and have it cut, of cours.

I just painted the plywood before I attached the legs.  Using the folding legs has the added benefit of being able to get the table out of the way, if needed, or using ir for something else temporarily.
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