Author Topic: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread  (Read 844830 times)

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jpcher

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #7995 on: July 16, 2013, 08:15:27 PM »
New question . . . Pads on furniture feet.

DD#1 moved a (free) couch into our hallway that she plans on moving into her new apartment.

My hallway has a slate flooring and I noticed a bit of a scratch on my floor from when the couch was dragged for a bit. Fortunately it's just a surface scratch and I was able to wash it off. No real damage, just a mark. But it gives me pause for thought.

The apartment DD#1 is moving into has wood flooring.

Any recommendations on how to pad the couch feet (and other furnishings) so that it doesn't damage the flooring in her apartment?

I thought of super-gluing felt to the bottom of all the furniture pieces, but I'm sure there's a better way.


Thoughts?


Thanks. ;D

Liliane

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #7996 on: July 16, 2013, 08:28:56 PM »
Outdoor Girl, the ducts themselves aren't exposed - I don't really see anything tape-able. I do have cold air returns in every room except the bathroom and kitchen though...which is weird. Those are the most temperate rooms.  :-\ I think I'll just have to chalk this up to serious weird...
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Harriet Jones

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #7997 on: July 16, 2013, 08:40:15 PM »
New question . . . Pads on furniture feet.

DD#1 moved a (free) couch into our hallway that she plans on moving into her new apartment.

My hallway has a slate flooring and I noticed a bit of a scratch on my floor from when the couch was dragged for a bit. Fortunately it's just a surface scratch and I was able to wash it off. No real damage, just a mark. But it gives me pause for thought.

The apartment DD#1 is moving into has wood flooring.

Any recommendations on how to pad the couch feet (and other furnishings) so that it doesn't damage the flooring in her apartment?

I thought of super-gluing felt to the bottom of all the furniture pieces, but I'm sure there's a better way.


Thoughts?


Thanks. ;D

There is felt for putting on the feet of furniture. Also, there are furniture "coasters" that you can put under the feet that can help keep furniture from moving around as well as protecting the floor.


Outdoor Girl

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #7998 on: July 16, 2013, 08:50:38 PM »
They actually sell precut felt pieces that are differently sized to fit onto the bottom of furniture, with the glue already on them.  I bought a bunch for my furniture when I redid my basement in laminate.
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Ontario

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #7999 on: July 16, 2013, 08:51:48 PM »
I'm north of the border.  For me, it depends on where you live and how old your house is.

If you live in the country, your house may have an oil furnace or electric heat and hence, no central air (I don't think AC works with oil furnaces but I could be wrong).  If you have a propane furnace, I think you can get AC.  In the rural areas, there is no natural gas piping so it limits your options.

My suburban neighbourhood was built in the late 80's.  All the homes were originally built with electric baseboard heaters.  Only those of us whose homes have been converted to gas heat and had all the ducts installed will have central air, too.

My understanding is that the mass majority of homes now are built with a central heating system, where natural gas is available.

AC is available without natural gas or propane.  Electric units are quite effective, although perhaps not quite as energy efficient.

Sure, but they aren't really 'central' air because the house doesn't have ducts.  Unless the house has ducts, it isn't considered 'central heating' or 'central air', AFAIK.
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Harriet Jones

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8000 on: July 16, 2013, 08:54:26 PM »
I'm north of the border.  For me, it depends on where you live and how old your house is.

If you live in the country, your house may have an oil furnace or electric heat and hence, no central air (I don't think AC works with oil furnaces but I could be wrong).  If you have a propane furnace, I think you can get AC.  In the rural areas, there is no natural gas piping so it limits your options.

My suburban neighbourhood was built in the late 80's.  All the homes were originally built with electric baseboard heaters.  Only those of us whose homes have been converted to gas heat and had all the ducts installed will have central air, too.

My understanding is that the mass majority of homes now are built with a central heating system, where natural gas is available.

AC is available without natural gas or propane.  Electric units are quite effective, although perhaps not quite as energy efficient.

Sure, but they aren't really 'central' air because the house doesn't have ducts.  Unless the house has ducts, it isn't considered 'central heating' or 'central air', AFAIK.

I'm not sure what you mean by this.  We have oil heat and central air (electric heat pump), both of which use the ducts in the house, even though they're separate units.

Betelnut

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8001 on: July 16, 2013, 08:58:11 PM »
I'm north of the border.  For me, it depends on where you live and how old your house is.

If you live in the country, your house may have an oil furnace or electric heat and hence, no central air (I don't think AC works with oil furnaces but I could be wrong).  If you have a propane furnace, I think you can get AC.  In the rural areas, there is no natural gas piping so it limits your options.

My suburban neighbourhood was built in the late 80's.  All the homes were originally built with electric baseboard heaters.  Only those of us whose homes have been converted to gas heat and had all the ducts installed will have central air, too.

My understanding is that the mass majority of homes now are built with a central heating system, where natural gas is available.

AC is available without natural gas or propane.  Electric units are quite effective, although perhaps not quite as energy efficient.

Sure, but they aren't really 'central' air because the house doesn't have ducts.  Unless the house has ducts, it isn't considered 'central heating' or 'central air', AFAIK.

I'm not sure what you mean by this.  We have oil heat and central air (electric heat pump), both of which use the ducts in the house, even though they're separate units.

I have an oil furnace and electric AC--central.  They use the same ducts.
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Outdoor Girl

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8002 on: July 16, 2013, 08:58:46 PM »
Sorry, I didn't realize you were talking about duct work with an oil furnace.  Which corrects my assumption that you can't have central air with an oil furnace.
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Dindrane

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8003 on: July 16, 2013, 10:15:03 PM »
I think one of the reasons you see more radiators and baseboard heaters up north than you do in the south is the humidity levels. Places that get really cold also get really, really dry in the winter. Combine cold air with most precipitation falling as snow, and you get a serious lack of humidity. Forced air heaters can exacerbate that issue, whereas baseboard heaters or radiators don't really have an effect on humidity.

It could also just be an older house/building thing. Ducts are necessary for central air and heat, and it doesn't seem like you can always retrofit them to older houses.

Outdoor Girl, I think that central a/c uses a different system than central heat (unless I'm just totally off base). In other words, the cooled or heated air flows through the same ducts, but the thing that cools the air is separate from the thing that heats it. My parents have central air and heat, so they have a furnace for the heat and a big honking a/c compressor unit thing next to the house for the a/c. So ultimately, the power source for your heat wouldn't necessarily matter to how you cool your house. Whether or not the heating system uses ducts would make a difference, though.


Liliane

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8004 on: July 16, 2013, 10:29:49 PM »
Outdoor Girl, I think that central a/c uses a different system than central heat (unless I'm just totally off base). In other words, the cooled or heated air flows through the same ducts, but the thing that cools the air is separate from the thing that heats it. My parents have central air and heat, so they have a furnace for the heat and a big honking a/c compressor unit thing next to the house for the a/c. So ultimately, the power source for your heat wouldn't necessarily matter to how you cool your house. Whether or not the heating system uses ducts would make a difference, though.

I'm not entirely sure about that, actually! The outdoor AC unit is what COOLS the air, and vents the heat back outside, but in our house, both the AC and the heat are apparently forced into the house through the furnace. (It doesn't make much sense to me, but the furnace does come on when the AC unit kicks in, it just isn't generating heat.) Then again, our furnace also apparently incorporates a dehumidifier - we had to have it serviced for water in the motor because the drain tube was clogged - so maybe it's both in one, and I'm just confused!
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Outdoor Girl

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8005 on: July 16, 2013, 10:37:19 PM »
Yes, my AC runs through the gas furnace.  But I didn't think that oil furnaces work the same way.

As for dry air, baseboard electric heaters are brutal for making the air dryer.  Growing up, we used a humidifier all winter long and a lot of body lotion.  The static electricity was killer; my brother and I use to have static fights.  You shuffle your sock feet around on the carpen and then touch the other person.  We could always work up quite a jolt!  With my forced air gas furnace, I can put a humidifier on it that will put the humidity back into the air.
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Coruscation

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8006 on: July 16, 2013, 10:55:09 PM »
In Australia, we have the Hansard, which is a record of parliament sittings. Is there something similar in the US and if so, what is it called?

snowdragon

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8007 on: July 16, 2013, 11:41:01 PM »
Outdoor Girl, I think that central a/c uses a different system than central heat (unless I'm just totally off base). In other words, the cooled or heated air flows through the same ducts, but the thing that cools the air is separate from the thing that heats it. My parents have central air and heat, so they have a furnace for the heat and a big honking a/c compressor unit thing next to the house for the a/c. So ultimately, the power source for your heat wouldn't necessarily matter to how you cool your house. Whether or not the heating system uses ducts would make a difference, though.

I'm not entirely sure about that, actually! The outdoor AC unit is what COOLS the air, and vents the heat back outside, but in our house, both the AC and the heat are apparently forced into the house through the furnace. (It doesn't make much sense to me, but the furnace does come on when the AC unit kicks in, it just isn't generating heat.) Then again, our furnace also apparently incorporates a dehumidifier - we had to have it serviced for water in the motor because the drain tube was clogged - so maybe it's both in one, and I'm just confused!

Mine, too.

JEsMom

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8008 on: July 16, 2013, 11:48:58 PM »
In Australia, we have the Hansard, which is a record of parliament sittings. Is there something similar in the US and if so, what is it called?

The Congressional Record.

Virg

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8009 on: July 17, 2013, 12:38:00 AM »
Liliane wrote:

"
I'm not entirely sure about that, actually! The outdoor AC unit is what COOLS the air, and vents the heat back outside, but in our house, both the AC and the heat are apparently forced into the house through the furnace. (It doesn't make much sense to me, but the furnace does come on when the AC unit kicks in, it just isn't generating heat.) Then again, our furnace also apparently incorporates a dehumidifier - we had to have it serviced for water in the motor because the drain tube was clogged - so maybe it's both in one, and I'm just confused!"

The issue you're having here is in seeing the furnace as the entire HVAC system, not just the heat generator.  In a system like yours, there are two units in the system.  One is the furnace, which makes heat, and the other is the A/C unit, which is a compression coil in the system and an external exchanger that sits outside.  As a side note, the exchanger doesn't cool the air (that's handled by the compression unit that's built into the system itself, inside the blower box), it gets rid of the heat that the compressor pulls out of the coils.  Both of those units share the blower and duct work.  So, the "furnace" doesn't come on when the A/C kicks in, the blower does, which blows the cold air around the ducts.  In the winter, the furnace does kick in to heat, and then the blower moves that heated air around the ducts.

Virg