Author Topic: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread  (Read 1084807 times)

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Carotte

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8355 on: September 11, 2013, 02:19:02 PM »
I painted a room and had to pop out the light switch plate (no screws, it was just pushed into the wall), it should just pop right back in when I try right?
No matter where I try to apply pression it doesn't stay in it's place, there's no obstruction that I can see, I didn't even move it that much to paint around it, but I feel like I'm missing something.

cwm

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8356 on: September 11, 2013, 02:58:10 PM »
I painted a room and had to pop out the light switch plate (no screws, it was just pushed into the wall), it should just pop right back in when I try right?
No matter where I try to apply pression it doesn't stay in it's place, there's no obstruction that I can see, I didn't even move it that much to paint around it, but I feel like I'm missing something.

Did you paint right up to the edge of where the plate goes? Sometimes a layer of paint can make just the difference between something fitting and not. You might take a layer of sandpaper (start small, just do tiny bits at a time) and see if you can get something sanded down so it fits again.

Virg

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8357 on: September 12, 2013, 12:10:10 PM »
Carotte wrote:

"I painted a room and had to pop out the light switch plate (no screws, it was just pushed into the wall), it should just pop right back in when I try right?
No matter where I try to apply pression it doesn't stay in it's place, there's no obstruction that I can see, I didn't even move it that much to paint around it, but I feel like I'm missing something."

Does it not stay because it doesn't fit back into the opening now, or does it fit then slip back out?  If it's the former, the cwm 's idea is the first thing to try.  If it goes into the opening that it came out of but won't stay put, it could be that pulling it out widened the opening, or if you used a high gloss or oil based paint, there might be less friction.  Also, if you pulled the switch itself out the wires behind it will unfold a bit, and if they're not refolded they might be preventing the switch (and thus the plate) from reseating the way it was.  And to ask the obvious question, is there a reason why you can't put the screws in it to keep it in place?  If there is, then you might want to use some sort of adhesive to stick it back in place, but the switch should really be attached to the box for safety reasons and the plate could then be screwed to the switch body.

Virg

Carotte

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8358 on: September 12, 2013, 01:32:07 PM »
I guess when pulling it out the wires moved around, because it does go back into the hole, but doesn't stay. It's weirdly made, there's no screws anywhere, it should 'clip' back but it seems like it doesn't catch anywhere in the wall to actually clip.
The switch/switchplate are one whole thing but I might just go and put some tape around while I figure it all.

Carotte

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8359 on: September 13, 2013, 10:29:20 AM »
Virg! Turns out you were right about mentioning the screws, maybe we're not talking about the same kind (mines are not visible, hidden behind one part of the switchplate) but they do exist!
Turns out all I have to do is (cut the electricity) separate the 'back with switch' from the part around, put the back/switch in the wall and tighten the screws of the doo-hiky things that will catch the wall and stay in place. And just clip the second part of the cover back on.

It's one like this:
no screws apparent, didn't cross my mind there could be some inside.

Slartibartfast

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8360 on: September 13, 2013, 02:20:12 PM »
Stupid multilingual question:

In languages which use gendered pronouns for objects (Spanish, French, Italian, etc.) - who determines whether new words are masculine or feminine?  I'd assume most normal words are based on centuries of tradition, but something like a modem or a blog wouldn't have that history.  And what about invented words, like Dr. Seuss?  If I declare that a huffletywub is a thing, do I get to pick the pronoun too?

Virg

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8361 on: September 13, 2013, 04:30:26 PM »
Slartibartfast wrote:

"I'd assume most normal words are based on centuries of tradition, but something like a modem or a blog wouldn't have that history."

For most words I imagine it's based on where the word came from.  For your examples, "modem" and "blog" are both contracted forms of existing words (modulator/demodulator and web log, respectively) so their gender would follow the gender of the words involved (modulator and log).  For fully invented words there are rules that tend to be true in general for languages that would guide choices, and for most languages there's an entity that's either directly or indirectly considered the "authority" for the language, so for stuff that doesn't fit precedent I'd look to whatever entity is considered to be the authority.  Just to give an example, most people in the UK would recognize Oxford's decisions regarding new additions to English.

Virg

Virg

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8362 on: September 13, 2013, 04:38:24 PM »
Carotte wrote:

"Virg! Turns out you were right about mentioning the screws, maybe we're not talking about the same kind (mines are not visible, hidden behind one part of the switchplate) but they do exist!"

Now I see the confusion.  As you deduced, the switchplate and screws are hidden behind a snap-on coverplate.  I didn't think of that either, but electrical code (in the U.S. at least) requires switches to be anchored to the wall box so I figured there had to be screws on the switchplate somewhere.  I had pictured a standard coverplate with screws that was attached to a standard switch, and the whole thing was wedged into a hole in the wall, and that didn't seem right which is why I suggested finding the anchor screws.

Virg

lady_disdain

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8363 on: September 13, 2013, 06:31:27 PM »
Stupid multilingual question:

In languages which use gendered pronouns for objects (Spanish, French, Italian, etc.) - who determines whether new words are masculine or feminine?  I'd assume most normal words are based on centuries of tradition, but something like a modem or a blog wouldn't have that history.  And what about invented words, like Dr. Seuss?  If I declare that a huffletywub is a thing, do I get to pick the pronoun too?

Yup. Neologisms are usually gendered by their creator. As for other words, they generally tend to creep into common language and get whatever gender "sounds" right. Often, there is a period when both genders are in use, before one ends up dominating. It can depend on the word origin, on phonetics (if it ends in A, in portuguese, it will probably be feminine, if in O, masculine), etc.

The results aren't always consistent. In Portugal, computer (computadora) is feminine. In Brazil, computer (computador) is masculine.

Onyx_TKD

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8364 on: September 14, 2013, 04:44:12 PM »
Why does my bank waive certain account fees if there are sufficient direct deposits every month? The fee waiver for a particular checking account type requires maintaining a minimum balance of $X or having direct deposits of at least $Y each month. I understand why a minimum balance would be beneficial to the bank (the customer keeps more of their money in a non-interest-bearing account at the bank) but why do they reward direct deposits? Is there a direct benefit to the bank, are they correlated with other financial behavior that benefits the bank, or what?

Harriet Jones

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8365 on: September 14, 2013, 04:53:31 PM »
Why does my bank waive certain account fees if there are sufficient direct deposits every month? The fee waiver for a particular checking account type requires maintaining a minimum balance of $X or having direct deposits of at least $Y each month. I understand why a minimum balance would be beneficial to the bank (the customer keeps more of their money in a non-interest-bearing account at the bank) but why do they reward direct deposits? Is there a direct benefit to the bank, are they correlated with other financial behavior that benefits the bank, or what?

Because you're not taking up a teller's time?  Or adding to the wear and tear on an ATM?

jpcher

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8366 on: September 14, 2013, 05:14:58 PM »
Because with a weekly/bi-weekly direct deposit from an employer means that the account is active.

For some reason banks like active accounts.

I have a savings account that has been dormant for many years. I don't pay a fee for it because my other accounts meet the "standard non-fee" requirements. But every year I have to sign a paper due to non-activity on that account which says "Yes. This is my account."

I'm curious as to how others would respond, but I'm betting that it has something to do with the direct deposit puts the account into active status rather than a dead account.

ClaireC79

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8367 on: September 14, 2013, 05:21:19 PM »
Possibly silly question:

I noticed on a BBC news broadcast that a senior nurse was titled with "Matron". I was just wondering, if a male nurse achieves the same rank, is he also Matron, or does he get another title?

Males can be Matrons however only a female nurse will be known as 'Sister', male nurses at that grade are 'charge nurse'

Freaked me out the first time someone referred to me as 'sister', I was a newly qualified midwife but our uniforms were very similar to the sister uniform (ours were navy with pink piping, theirs were navy with white piping) as traditionally all midwives were sisters

Slartibartfast

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8368 on: September 14, 2013, 05:59:44 PM »
I'm guessing banks like direct deposits because they create a barrier to the customer taking their business elsewhere.  It's nice and easy to have direct deposits and automatic payments set up, but if there's a problem - yeah, it's annoying to have to stop things, and the bank/company you're having a dispute with has no real incentive to expend energy to straighten things out.  But a customer with a direct deposit can't just say "I'm taking my ball and going home!" without having to jump through hoops, so is probably more willing to put up with little stuff that other customers won't.

(That's my guess, anyway!)

RebeccainGA

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8369 on: September 16, 2013, 08:44:36 AM »
Because with a weekly/bi-weekly direct deposit from an employer means that the account is active.

For some reason banks like active accounts.

I have a savings account that has been dormant for many years. I don't pay a fee for it because my other accounts meet the "standard non-fee" requirements. But every year I have to sign a paper due to non-activity on that account which says "Yes. This is my account."

I'm curious as to how others would respond, but I'm betting that it has something to do with the direct deposit puts the account into active status rather than a dead account.
If the account is dormant, but not abandoned, they don't have to remit the funds to the state. If they go to abandoned, they have to give the money to the state for their 'unclaimed funds' programs - which causes the bank some work, lowers the amount of their 'deposits on record' and reduces their number of open accounts - none of which are desirable, as the number of open accounts, and their total deposits amounts, are both indicators of the health of the institution for regulators and investors, and the way they do business (they can 'borrow' your deposits to use to invest/loan out if they meet certain conditions).