Author Topic: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread  (Read 1013598 times)

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Liliane

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8595 on: October 18, 2013, 05:22:36 AM »
Vocab/Language question:

A woman whose husband has died is a widow, and you can say "She was widowed last year".

A man whose wife has died is a widower. Is one capable of saying he was "widowered" or is that not a word?

Widowed is actually correct for both genders. :)
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WolfWay

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8596 on: October 18, 2013, 05:36:34 AM »
Vocab/Language question:

A woman whose husband has died is a widow, and you can say "She was widowed last year".

A man whose wife has died is a widower. Is one capable of saying he was "widowered" or is that not a word?

Widowed is actually correct for both genders. :)
Ah. Thank you.  ;D Silly english language, always changing the darn rules.
It's best to love your family as you would a Siberian Tiger - from a distance, preferably separated by bars . -- Pearls Before Swine (16-May-2009)

Liliane

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8597 on: October 18, 2013, 06:05:40 AM »
Vocab/Language question:

A woman whose husband has died is a widow, and you can say "She was widowed last year".

A man whose wife has died is a widower. Is one capable of saying he was "widowered" or is that not a word?

Widowed is actually correct for both genders. :)
Ah. Thank you.  ;D Silly english language, always changing the darn rules.

I like to refer to a specific quote on occasions like this.

"English doesn't borrow from other languages. It beats them up in a dark alley and searches their pockets for loose grammar." ;D
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WolfWay

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8598 on: October 18, 2013, 06:39:35 AM »
Vocab/Language question:

A woman whose husband has died is a widow, and you can say "She was widowed last year".

A man whose wife has died is a widower. Is one capable of saying he was "widowered" or is that not a word?

Widowed is actually correct for both genders. :)
Ah. Thank you.  ;D Silly english language, always changing the darn rules.

I like to refer to a specific quote on occasions like this.

"English doesn't borrow from other languages. It beats them up in a dark alley and searches their pockets for loose grammar." ;D
I wish I'd known that phrase a couple of days ago. I was debating with a coworker why almost everything in English seems to be irregular (e.g. spelling vs pronounciation, plurals, past tenses) and she was lamenting how hard it was to remember it all when the rules seem to keep changing. I just told her to take her best shot at what she meant and I'd just try figure out it by context.  ;D

I should probably tell her about how "cleave" has two completely opposite meanings. And so does "sanction", now that I think about it.
It's best to love your family as you would a Siberian Tiger - from a distance, preferably separated by bars . -- Pearls Before Swine (16-May-2009)

Diane AKA Traska

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8599 on: October 18, 2013, 07:15:49 AM »
Vocab/Language question:

A woman whose husband has died is a widow, and you can say "She was widowed last year".

A man whose wife has died is a widower. Is one capable of saying he was "widowered" or is that not a word?

Widowed is actually correct for both genders. :)
Ah. Thank you.  ;D Silly english language, always changing the darn rules.

I like to refer to a specific quote on occasions like this.

"English doesn't borrow from other languages. It beats them up in a dark alley and searches their pockets for loose grammar." ;D
I wish I'd known that phrase a couple of days ago. I was debating with a coworker why almost everything in English seems to be irregular (e.g. spelling vs pronounciation, plurals, past tenses) and she was lamenting how hard it was to remember it all when the rules seem to keep changing. I just told her to take her best shot at what she meant and I'd just try figure out it by context.  ;D

I should probably tell her about how "cleave" has two completely opposite meanings. And so does "sanction", now that I think about it.

Even better... one raises a barn to build it, then razes it to destroy it.
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KenveeB

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8600 on: October 18, 2013, 08:21:20 AM »
Vocab/Language question:

A woman whose husband has died is a widow, and you can say "She was widowed last year".

A man whose wife has died is a widower. Is one capable of saying he was "widowered" or is that not a word?

Widowed is actually correct for both genders. :)

I remember Meg Ryan discussing this in Sleepless in Seattle. "If a man is a widower, why do we say he's been widowed? Why don't we say he's been widowered?" That's the main reason I know. :)

2littlemonkeys

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8601 on: October 18, 2013, 10:43:19 AM »
I never realized how utterly exasperating the English language was until I started teaching my kid to read.

Holy mackerel.  I kept thinking I found a 'rule' to help her with phonics and then a word would come along and prove me wrong.  I got especially excited when I discovered it seemed single syllable words that ended in "e" had a long vowel sound (bake, cake, kite, cute, cone, etc.)

And then we got to love.  And give.  And a few others that made me just start saying "MOST of the time..."

Virg

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8602 on: October 18, 2013, 10:47:51 AM »
WolfWay, one of my professors once told me that English is what happened when Norman soldiers tried to hit on Saxon barmaids, but I don't know if that was a quote or something he thought up.  In any case, it's actually surprisingly fitting to how English came to be, so it's even funnier to me now.

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jilly

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8603 on: October 18, 2013, 02:08:58 PM »
http://blog.inkyfool.com/ I've only read The Etymologicon but it's fascinating once you get into his style of writing

jedikaiti

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8604 on: October 18, 2013, 02:16:01 PM »
Vocab/Language question:

A woman whose husband has died is a widow, and you can say "She was widowed last year".

A man whose wife has died is a widower. Is one capable of saying he was "widowered" or is that not a word?

Widowed is actually correct for both genders. :)
Ah. Thank you.  ;D Silly english language, always changing the darn rules.

I like to refer to a specific quote on occasions like this.

"English doesn't borrow from other languages. It beats them up in a dark alley and searches their pockets for loose grammar." ;D

and spare vocabulary.
What part of v_e = \sqrt{\frac{2GM}{r}} don't you understand? It's only rocket science!

"The problem with re-examining your brilliant ideas is that more often than not, you discover they are the intellectual equivalent of saying, 'Hold my beer and watch this!'" - Cindy Couture

Carotte

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8605 on: October 18, 2013, 03:36:30 PM »
I never realized how utterly exasperating the English language was until I started teaching my kid to read.

Holy mackerel.  I kept thinking I found a 'rule' to help her with phonics and then a word would come along and prove me wrong.  I got especially excited when I discovered it seemed single syllable words that ended in "e" had a long vowel sound (bake, cake, kite, cute, cone, etc.)

And then we got to love.  And give.  And a few others that made me just start saying "MOST of the time..."

Speaking about learning to read, this summer I talked with an 8 y/old girl who lives in the UK, and for a reason that I cannot fathom and who will, I'm pretty sure, backfire, they where taught to spell words, not using the 'letter' but the sound of the letter in the word.
For example, cat, you should spell it " c/a/t : see/ah/tee" but they had to spell it "kaa/ah/té".
It was weird, is that something that is widely done?
I'm pretty sure kids can learn that cat and ceiling starts with the same letter but that it can sound different ways without that.

Diane AKA Traska

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8606 on: October 18, 2013, 03:41:15 PM »
I never realized how utterly exasperating the English language was until I started teaching my kid to read.

Holy mackerel.  I kept thinking I found a 'rule' to help her with phonics and then a word would come along and prove me wrong.  I got especially excited when I discovered it seemed single syllable words that ended in "e" had a long vowel sound (bake, cake, kite, cute, cone, etc.)

And then we got to love.  And give.  And a few others that made me just start saying "MOST of the time..."

To quote comedian Brian Regan:

"It's I before E except after C, or when sounding like A as in neighbor and weigh, and on weekends and holidays and all throughout May, and you'll never be right no matter what you say."

Or another funny (unattributed) quote:  How smart could Einstein really have been... he got the "I before E" rule wrong twice in his own name!
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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8607 on: October 18, 2013, 03:43:35 PM »
Quote
I'm this >< close to giving up on baking anything containing egg whites.  eHellions please help me, I'm obviously doing something stupid when it comes to dealing with them.

Recipe 1 - custard tart required me to fold beaten egg whites into egg yolk/sugar mix - served my family lumpy custard tart for Easter
Recipe 2 - lemon macaroons required me to fold flour and ground almonds into egg whites - baked myself some stick pancakes

When a recipe calls for me to fold something in, is there any reason that I can't use my electric whisk?

Electric whisk probably won't work, folding is an annoyingly slow task or you deflate the egg whites.  I use a spatula or large spoon and keep gently working them, large swipes from the bottom of the bowl, up the sides and down the middle until they are pretty well blended.  I try to avoid recipes that require folding if at all possible!


Mental Magpie

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8608 on: October 18, 2013, 03:44:16 PM »
I never realized how utterly exasperating the English language was until I started teaching my kid to read.

Holy mackerel.  I kept thinking I found a 'rule' to help her with phonics and then a word would come along and prove me wrong.  I got especially excited when I discovered it seemed single syllable words that ended in "e" had a long vowel sound (bake, cake, kite, cute, cone, etc.)

And then we got to love.  And give.  And a few others that made me just start saying "MOST of the time..."

Speaking about learning to read, this summer I talked with an 8 y/old girl who lives in the UK, and for a reason that I cannot fathom and who will, I'm pretty sure, backfire, they where taught to spell words, not using the 'letter' but the sound of the letter in the word.
For example, cat, you should spell it " c/a/t : see/ah/tee" but they had to spell it "kaa/ah/té".
It was weird, is that something that is widely done?
I'm pretty sure kids can learn that cat and ceiling starts with the same letter but that it can sound different ways without that.

Boyfriend's 6 year old does that, but she's more sounding it out than anything.  "Kaa...kaaa....C! Ah...ah...A!  Te...te...T!"
The problem with choosing the lesser of two evils is that you're still choosing evil.

lilfox

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8609 on: October 18, 2013, 04:12:17 PM »
I never realized how utterly exasperating the English language was until I started teaching my kid to read.

Holy mackerel.  I kept thinking I found a 'rule' to help her with phonics and then a word would come along and prove me wrong.  I got especially excited when I discovered it seemed single syllable words that ended in "e" had a long vowel sound (bake, cake, kite, cute, cone, etc.)

And then we got to love.  And give.  And a few others that made me just start saying "MOST of the time..."

Which leads to my stupid, probably rhetorical question of why "learn to read" books that supposedly contain the simplest English words to learn invariably include words that violate general pronunciation rules.

I'm looking at you, counting books.  "One" and "Two"?  Yeah, try explaining why those sound the way they do while also teaching how to sound words out.