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Author Topic: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread  (Read 2410563 times)

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newbiePA

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8820 on: December 23, 2013, 04:06:35 PM »
The things that run through my head at 11:20 at night, let me tell you...

Perhaps someone of medical leaning can help me out with this. So the spine is divided into several sections. Sacral, lumbar, thoracic, and cervical. Why is it that the cervical spine is the highest, and yet the cervix is down near the bottom of the spine? Aren't those words related somehow?
oh oh oh! I know this!  Cervix means neck. So cervical vertebrae are in the neck.  The cervix is the "neck" of the uterus.
Not such a newbie anymore

camlan

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8821 on: December 26, 2013, 01:21:25 PM »
Where did you learn English? Because the pronunciation of "aunt" varies depending on where you are.

It's less of a where than a who, actually. I'm from Germany, but my mom is an English teacher and her best friend at the time I went to elementary school was from London (and often lent me the English Disney VHS tapes she got for her kids, which is how I got started learning the language), both of them spoke English with British accents. My teachers at school, however, leaned more towards "generic" American English. So I grew up with a wild variety of pronunciations. That's also why my accent when I speak English is pretty noticeable, but not the stereotypical German one ;) (people who only heard my voice have guessed that I might be Russian or, which still puzzles me a bit, Indian).

I believe the first time I heard the word aunt was in the movie "The Rescuers" where the villain in one scene refers to herself as "auntie Medusa" and if I'm not mistaken, she actually pronounced it "awn-tee". But in every media or any conversation I've had since with English speaking people it was pronounced like the animal "ant"...

Sounds a bit like me learning German. We lived in Germany when I was very small and I learned a bit of German, with southern German accent/pronunciation. Then in high school and college I had one teacher with a southern pronunciation and two with northern German pronunciations and I got all mixed up on how to pronounce some words.

In general, most Americans say "ant."

I have one set of nieces and nephews who have a dad who says "ahnt" and a mom who says "ant." The oldest child picked up on that at a very young age, and insisted that his dad's sisters be "ahnts" and his mom's sisters were "ants." The kids call us all by the correct pronunciation--it's the adults who get all confused.
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


camlan

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8822 on: December 29, 2013, 01:02:18 PM »
Here's another question.

What's the difference between a weather/storm watch and a weather/storm warning?

I know a weather advisory is the lowest panic level of them all. But the words "warning" and "watch" don't really convey different levels of impending doom, or snow or rain or what-have-you.

So how does the scale go, from lowest to highest?

Advisory
Watch
Warning

or

Advisory
Warning
Watch?
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


jpcher

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8823 on: December 29, 2013, 01:09:57 PM »

Advisory
Watch
Warning?

This is correct.

Watch = conditions are good for said storm, so Watch out.

Warning = conditions are really, really good that said storm is probably, more likely than not, going to happen.


Caveats put in place because you never know what's going to happen with the weather. ;)

KenveeB

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8824 on: December 29, 2013, 02:17:20 PM »
Here's another question.

What's the difference between a weather/storm watch and a weather/storm warning?

I know a weather advisory is the lowest panic level of them all. But the words "warning" and "watch" don't really convey different levels of impending doom, or snow or rain or what-have-you.

So how does the scale go, from lowest to highest?

Advisory
Watch
Warning

or

Advisory
Warning
Watch?

Advisory is "we think this could happen in the near future."
Warning is "conditions are currently right for this to happen."
Watch is "take cover, this is happening!"

In the case of tornadoes, the kind of storm warning I'm most familiar with, a tornado warning means conditions are right for it to form, but a tornado watch means a tornado has actually been spotted.

Elfmama

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8825 on: December 29, 2013, 03:20:58 PM »
Here's another question.

What's the difference between a weather/storm watch and a weather/storm warning?

I know a weather advisory is the lowest panic level of them all. But the words "warning" and "watch" don't really convey different levels of impending doom, or snow or rain or what-have-you.

So how does the scale go, from lowest to highest?

Advisory
Watch
Warning

or

Advisory
Warning
Watch?

Advisory is "we think this could happen in the near future."
Warning is "conditions are currently right for this to happen."
Watch is "take cover, this is happening!"

In the case of tornadoes, the kind of storm warning I'm most familiar with, a tornado warning means conditions are right for it to form, but a tornado watch means a tornado has actually been spotted.
Sorry, Kenvee, but you've flipped watch and warning.
 
Watch is "conditions are currently right for this to happen. "  IOW, "We're watching this carefully."
Warning is "take cover, this is happening!"  Just like any other warning.
« Last Edit: December 29, 2013, 03:23:59 PM by Elfmama »
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
Common sense is not a gift, but a curse.  Because then
you have to deal with all the people who don't have it.
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

jpcher

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8826 on: December 29, 2013, 03:43:42 PM »
New question about propane tanks . . . I have a propane space heater, but I think this question could also apply to propane grills.

Does the device (heater/grill) burn more of the gas if the tank's valve is open all the way?

or . . . does it save on fuel if the valve on the tank is turned down almost to the point of shutting off the fuel flow?

or . . . does the tanks valve matter at all? Meaning the device itself will regulate the fuel flow?

KenveeB

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8827 on: December 29, 2013, 04:38:50 PM »
Here's another question.

What's the difference between a weather/storm watch and a weather/storm warning?

I know a weather advisory is the lowest panic level of them all. But the words "warning" and "watch" don't really convey different levels of impending doom, or snow or rain or what-have-you.

So how does the scale go, from lowest to highest?

Advisory
Watch
Warning

or

Advisory
Warning
Watch?

Advisory is "we think this could happen in the near future."
Warning is "conditions are currently right for this to happen."
Watch is "take cover, this is happening!"

In the case of tornadoes, the kind of storm warning I'm most familiar with, a tornado warning means conditions are right for it to form, but a tornado watch means a tornado has actually been spotted.
Sorry, Kenvee, but you've flipped watch and warning.
 
Watch is "conditions are currently right for this to happen. "  IOW, "We're watching this carefully."
Warning is "take cover, this is happening!"  Just like any other warning.

You're right, can I blame my medication? :)  I've only been hearing these my whole life in Texas.

kckgirl

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8828 on: December 29, 2013, 06:22:53 PM »
Snipping the quote tree...

You're right, can I blame my medication? :)  I've only been hearing these my whole life in Texas.

Of course you can blame your medication!
Maryland

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8829 on: December 29, 2013, 07:58:33 PM »
I just checked the National Weather Service glossary pages, and part of why it's confusing is that "advisory" doesn't mean less likely than a warning. It's  used for things that aren't dangerous enough to need a watch or warning, so there are things like frost advisories, which are meant for farmers and gardeners. From a current advisory, "A WINTER WEATHER ADVISORY MEANS THAT ONE OR MORE WINTER WEATHER HAZARDS ARE EXPECTED TO CAUSE TRAVEL DIFFICULTIES."

For dangerous events such as thunderstorms and hurricanes, they start at "watch"--below that the forecast may say something like "interests on the Florida coast are advised to keep an eye on conditions."
Any advice that requires the use of a time machine may safely be ignored.

Slartibartfast

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8830 on: December 29, 2013, 08:19:49 PM »
Stupid question but I feel stupider for not knowing: when a transgender person talks about his/her childhood (i.e. the period of their life they lived as their biological gender), do they use their current preferred pronoun, or the former one?  E.g. would someone who grew up a girl and is now living as a man say "When I was a boy" or "When I was a girl?"  Or does this vary person to person?

The topic came up tonight at a family Christmas gathering (one of SIL's good friends is trans) and I wasn't sure how to address it.  I asked SIL, but she doesn't really know either, just said she talks about her friend as "she" before his surgery and "he" after because that's how she knew her friend from before.

Dazi

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8831 on: December 29, 2013, 08:33:13 PM »
Stupid question but I feel stupider for not knowing: when a transgender person talks about his/her childhood (i.e. the period of their life they lived as their biological gender), do they use their current preferred pronoun, or the former one?  E.g. would someone who grew up a girl and is now living as a man say "When I was a boy" or "When I was a girl?"  Or does this vary person to person?

The topic came up tonight at a family Christmas gathering (one of SIL's good friends is trans) and I wasn't sure how to address it.  I asked SIL, but she doesn't really know either, just said she talks about her friend as "she" before his surgery and "he" after because that's how she knew her friend from before.

The  few  people  I know who are  TG have always stuck with "when I was  a child,  kid, teenager,  younger".  To be fair, most everyone I know goes with some version of that.   I don't  think  I've ever heard  any one but my  GP say "when I was a lad/boy".
Meditate. Live purely. Quiet the mind. Do your work with mastery. Like the moon, come out from behind the clouds! Shine. ---Gautama Buddah





Diane AKA Traska

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8832 on: December 29, 2013, 10:30:16 PM »
Stupid question but I feel stupider for not knowing: when a transgender person talks about his/her childhood (i.e. the period of their life they lived as their biological gender), do they use their current preferred pronoun, or the former one?  E.g. would someone who grew up a girl and is now living as a man say "When I was a boy" or "When I was a girl?"  Or does this vary person to person?

The topic came up tonight at a family Christmas gathering (one of SIL's good friends is trans) and I wasn't sure how to address it.  I asked SIL, but she doesn't really know either, just said she talks about her friend as "she" before his surgery and "he" after because that's how she knew her friend from before.

The  few  people  I know who are  TG have always stuck with "when I was  a child,  kid, teenager,  younger".  To be fair, most everyone I know goes with some version of that.   I don't  think  I've ever heard  any one but my  GP say "when I was a lad/boy".

Pretty much this.  :)

(And there's no honest question about TG issues that's stupid... any chance to enlighten is A-OK!)
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Virg

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8833 on: December 29, 2013, 11:00:32 PM »
jpcher wrote:

"Does the device (heater/grill) burn more of the gas if the tank's valve is open all the way?"

No.  The tank valve is to allow you to disengage the tank from the feed line and to provide a safety cutoff valve in case the device's valve assembly fails to close when it's not using the fuel.  Once it's firmly attached, you should open the tank valve all the way.  The device itself will have a regulator and its own operating valve, and that regulation unit will be expecting full line pressure.  If you use the tank valve to restrict the fuel supply, the device won't work correctly (and depending on the regulator on the device, it may not work at all).  It'll use less fuel, but it won't do what it's supposed to do.  To use your example of a gas grill, closing off the tank valve will cut down on propane usage, but it'll also prevent the grill from heating to its full capacity.  For your heater, it won't generate enough heat to keep the room at the thermostat setting.

Virg

cwm

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #8834 on: December 30, 2013, 12:33:55 PM »
Stupid question but I feel stupider for not knowing: when a transgender person talks about his/her childhood (i.e. the period of their life they lived as their biological gender), do they use their current preferred pronoun, or the former one?  E.g. would someone who grew up a girl and is now living as a man say "When I was a boy" or "When I was a girl?"  Or does this vary person to person?

The topic came up tonight at a family Christmas gathering (one of SIL's good friends is trans) and I wasn't sure how to address it.  I asked SIL, but she doesn't really know either, just said she talks about her friend as "she" before his surgery and "he" after because that's how she knew her friend from before.

The  few  people  I know who are  TG have always stuck with "when I was  a child,  kid, teenager,  younger".  To be fair, most everyone I know goes with some version of that.   I don't  think  I've ever heard  any one but my  GP say "when I was a lad/boy".

Pretty much this.  :)

(And there's no honest question about TG issues that's stupid... any chance to enlighten is A-OK!)

I have one genderfluid acquaintance. I never know one meeting to the next what gender s/he will be identifying as that day. When history gets brought up, both terms are used nearly interchangably when one is required.

I love that friend. S/he's so nice, and every time we get together we have a good time, no matter what names or pronouns are used.