Author Topic: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread  (Read 1123885 times)

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Katana_Geldar

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #9075 on: February 12, 2014, 10:16:13 PM »
How were soups made before blenders? I've made pea and pumpkin soups and they required blending.

PastryGoddess

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #9076 on: February 12, 2014, 10:38:31 PM »
How were soups made before blenders? I've made pea and pumpkin soups and they required blending.

Not all soups require blending.  Most soups from before electricity was common were not blended. 

Slartibartfast

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #9077 on: February 12, 2014, 10:39:54 PM »
Weird question of the day.

I have been trying hard to make decent biscuits. Most recipes stress that everything has to be ice cold, to put all the ingredients you are not working with at that moment in the fridge, to put the butter and flour mixture back in the fridge after cutting the butter in, etc. But biscuits are a Southern US tradition and fridges are rather recent. So how were the buttery bits of goodness made in a Georgia summer before refrigeration? Based on the recipes I've read, it would have been impossible since the ingredients would be pantry cool, not fridge cold.

I make biscuits all the time and I've never heard that.  The butter does have to be cold, not melted, but other than that it shouldn't make a difference (and even "a little cold" is cold enough, as long as it's crumbly and not squishy).

Katana_Geldar

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #9078 on: February 12, 2014, 10:43:23 PM »
How were soups made before blenders? I've made pea and pumpkin soups and they required blending.

Not all soups require blending.  Most soups from before electricity was common were not blended.
But surely they had pea soups before they had blenders, or were they just not smooth?

lady_disdain

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #9079 on: February 12, 2014, 10:59:28 PM »
A manual food mill will pureed soup quite nicely.

Dindrane

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #9080 on: February 12, 2014, 11:01:55 PM »
A manual food mill will pureed soup quite nicely.

And those have been around for a long time...definitely well before electricity was common available.


Mel the Redcap

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #9081 on: February 12, 2014, 11:18:54 PM »
How were soups made before blenders? I've made pea and pumpkin soups and they required blending.

Not all soups require blending.  Most soups from before electricity was common were not blended.
But surely they had pea soups before they had blenders, or were they just not smooth?

Squishing things through a sieve works quite well. :)
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Vall

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #9082 on: February 13, 2014, 05:11:19 AM »
Weird question of the day.

I have been trying hard to make decent biscuits. Most recipes stress that everything has to be ice cold, to put all the ingredients you are not working with at that moment in the fridge, to put the butter and flour mixture back in the fridge after cutting the butter in, etc. But biscuits are a Southern US tradition and fridges are rather recent. So how were the buttery bits of goodness made in a Georgia summer before refrigeration? Based on the recipes I've read, it would have been impossible since the ingredients would be pantry cool, not fridge cold.
I don't know if this is an answer but it might be a possibility.

My dad grew up in a home without running water and he was about 7 when his mom first got an ice box (not an electric refrigerator).  Before that, he says that the way they kept things like butter cool in summer was to lower it down into the well.  Also, he used to hide and cool his occasional bottles of Coke by putting them in the running stream near the house.

Margo

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #9083 on: February 13, 2014, 07:43:15 AM »
Having heavy stoneware bowls to mix in, and rinsing your hands in cold water before any hand mixing also help, and for pastry making, a marble pastry slab.


Dindrane

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #9084 on: February 13, 2014, 08:45:08 AM »
Incidentally, if you're having a hard time making more traditional style biscuits (that are rolled and cut out), drop biscuits are a lot easier. You make the dough thinner so that it's more the consistency of a thick batter, and then you just pour it in little dollops onto the pan. It's not necessary to manipulate the dough so much, so it can be easier to keep things light and fluffy. And because the tops aren't smooth, you get delicious crispy bits to go with the soft inside.


Luci

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #9085 on: February 13, 2014, 11:20:08 AM »
How were soups made before blenders? I've made pea and pumpkin soups and they required blending.

Not all soups require blending.  Most soups from before electricity was common were not blended.
But surely they had pea soups before they had blenders, or were they just not smooth?

Squishing things through a sieve works quite well. :)

That is what my grandmother did. It was a real pain.

http://www.etsy.com/listing/168629323/antique-metal-canning-sieve-with-wood?ref=sr_gallery_9&ga_search_query=colander+strainer&ga_page=3&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery

Thipu1

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #9086 on: February 13, 2014, 11:26:35 AM »
We make pea soup without a blender and have never had a problem.  The pea and onion mixture is properly smooth but we like a bit of texture in the carrots, celery and potatoes. 

blue2000

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #9087 on: February 13, 2014, 11:45:37 AM »
How were soups made before blenders? I've made pea and pumpkin soups and they required blending.

Not all soups require blending.  Most soups from before electricity was common were not blended.
But surely they had pea soups before they had blenders, or were they just not smooth?

Squishing things through a sieve works quite well. :)

That is what my grandmother did. It was a real pain.

http://www.etsy.com/listing/168629323/antique-metal-canning-sieve-with-wood?ref=sr_gallery_9&ga_search_query=colander+strainer&ga_page=3&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery


That was the kind I used as a kid, helping to make applesauce or tomato sauce. I didn't mind it. I didn't have to wash it though.

(And we didn't pay $60 for it either!!!!  ??? )
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Outdoor Girl

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #9088 on: February 13, 2014, 11:47:41 AM »
Wow!  I could sell mine for $60?

I use it all the time for applesauce and tomato sauce.  It means I don't have to worry about the skins or the seeds or the odd piece of core.  I just sieve them through the cone.  It is a pain in the butt to clean, though.
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ladyknight1

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Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #9089 on: February 13, 2014, 12:01:45 PM »
For the person trying to make American style biscuits, I like King Arthur Flour's cream biscuit recipe.


 http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/bakewell-cream-biscuits-recipe