Author Topic: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread  (Read 1088290 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

snowfire

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2290
Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #9120 on: February 27, 2014, 09:25:49 PM »
I got an electric screwdriver to help me unscrew a door knob.  It worked well on one screw but not the other--it essentially stripped the screw.  How can I get that screw out now?

Several companies sell bits that will bite into the head of a stripped screw to remove it.  I got one from sears years ago.  Very handy.

Carotte

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1171
Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #9121 on: February 28, 2014, 06:40:32 AM »
There's a hack floating on pinterest saying that if you put a rubber band (a large one) between the screw and the screwdriver head it should work.
I have no idea how effective that can be, and it probably doesn't work on a screw too stripped...

Onyx_TKD

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1408
Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #9122 on: March 02, 2014, 10:20:15 PM »
Stupid question: Does this style of comic-book costume headgear have a real-world basis or any (non-aesthetic) function?


I've recently started reading some of the X-Men comic books and seen more than one character wearing this style of headgear. I know comic book costumes can be seriously outlandish, but most of them seem to have some logic and/or basis in reality to them, even if they're taken to ridiculous extremes. E.g., masks conceal identities; spandex-y suits offer flexibility, like gymnasts' leotards; superhero capes may not have much function, but they're a long-established fashion item in the real world. However, I'm not aware of any real-world version of the pictured headgear, nor can I figure out what possible function it would serve. It doesn't conceal or protect the face; it doesn't appear to do much for keeping the hair contained. It could keep the neck warm, but that's not very useful in situations where other characters are running around almost naked in apparent comfort.  ;D So what does it do?

PastryGoddess

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 5066
    • My Image Portfolio and Store
Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #9123 on: March 03, 2014, 12:33:00 AM »
It looks almost like a modified balakava

KenveeB

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 8687
Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #9124 on: March 03, 2014, 12:59:55 AM »
It keeps the hair artistically arranged yet out of the eyes? Other than that, I've got nothing.

Katana_Geldar

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1924
Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #9125 on: March 03, 2014, 02:37:48 AM »
You could use it for skiing if you don't want flat hair.

WolfWay

  • They burnt down my house... They ate my tailor!
  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2555
Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #9126 on: March 03, 2014, 03:45:24 AM »
It's just aesthetic (and to highlight Gambit's cheekbones).  ;D

I think you'll see similar sort of facial covering like that in the post transformation Age of Apocalypse Archangel (later on in the series). No idea if that's armour, skin colour or some sort of hemi-balaclava.

It's best to love your family as you would a Siberian Tiger - from a distance, preferably separated by bars . -- Pearls Before Swine (16-May-2009)

Frog24

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 344
Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #9127 on: March 03, 2014, 07:23:09 PM »
Gambit is actually 527 years old... that headgear keeps his jowls from flapping about while he tries to charm Rogue.

Onyx_TKD

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1408
Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #9128 on: March 03, 2014, 08:42:40 PM »
You could use it for skiing if you don't want flat hair.

That would be interesting:  :)
"So why do you wear that thing anyway?"
"I don't want to get flat hair when I ski."
"...But we're not skiing. We're on a mission. In the summer. It's warm out."
"I went skiing before we left. How do you think I get my hair to look like this?"

Gambit is actually 527 years old... that headgear keeps his jowls from flapping about while he tries to charm Rogue.

 ;D But that just raises more questions! What sorcery keeps his jowls under control when he's not in his superhero uniform? He does appear without the weird headgear as well. Are the other characters wearing similar headgear also centuries old with flappy jowls, or do they just think it's a cool fad?

Layla Miller

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2685
  • I know stuff.
Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #9129 on: March 04, 2014, 11:17:54 PM »
Okay, I know next to nothing about high school (or any other kind of) football, but I'm writing a story that involves the game and I'm not having much luck using Google or Wikipedia, so here goes.  I understand that ending a game in a tie is rare because generally they just stay in overtime until someone finally wins.  But is it possible to do so?  And if so, under what circumstances would it be likely?
I searched for nothing on the Internet and got 175,000,000 hits.

guihong

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6591
Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #9130 on: March 04, 2014, 11:58:17 PM »
Okay, I know next to nothing about high school (or any other kind of) football, but I'm writing a story that involves the game and I'm not having much luck using Google or Wikipedia, so here goes.  I understand that ending a game in a tie is rare because generally they just stay in overtime until someone finally wins.  But is it possible to do so?  And if so, under what circumstances would it be likely?

In college football, there are multiple overtime periods until a winner is declared.

In pro football, during the regular season, if the receiving team kicks a field goal in overtime, the other team gets a chance to respond.  If Other Team scores a touchdown, they win.  If they make a field goal, the game goes on as they would be tied again.  If they fail to score, the original receiving team wins.

 But, if the teams are still tied after the 15 minute overtime, the game ends in a tie.  If the receiving team scores a touchdown, they win.

During the playoffs, by definition someone has to win, so there are unlimited overtimes.  For example,The Cleveland Browns finally defeated the NY Jets in double overtime in 1986, on their way to defeat by Denver in the AFC Championship Game.
« Last Edit: March 05, 2014, 12:01:28 AM by guihong »



Diane AKA Traska

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4756
  • Or you can just call me Diane. (NE USA EHellion)
Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #9131 on: March 05, 2014, 07:17:55 AM »
Okay, I know next to nothing about high school (or any other kind of) football, but I'm writing a story that involves the game and I'm not having much luck using Google or Wikipedia, so here goes.  I understand that ending a game in a tie is rare because generally they just stay in overtime until someone finally wins.  But is it possible to do so?  And if so, under what circumstances would it be likely?

In college football, there are multiple overtime periods until a winner is declared.

In pro football, during the regular season, if the receiving team kicks a field goal in overtime, the other team gets a chance to respond.  If Other Team scores a touchdown, they win.  If they make a field goal, the game goes on as they would be tied again.  If they fail to score, the original receiving team wins.

 But, if the teams are still tied after the 15 minute overtime, the game ends in a tie.  If the receiving team scores a touchdown, they win.

During the playoffs, by definition someone has to win, so there are unlimited overtimes.  For example,The Cleveland Browns finally defeated the NY Jets in double overtime in 1986, on their way to defeat by Denver in the AFC Championship Game.

Double overtime?  Pssh.  I once watched a quintuple overtime hockey game.  Eight hours, all in one stretch.  It was... well, kind of epic.
Location:
Philadelphia, PA

oz diva

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1185
  • The Classics are SO last Century
Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #9132 on: March 05, 2014, 07:58:52 AM »
Okay, I know next to nothing about high school (or any other kind of) football, but I'm writing a story that involves the game and I'm not having much luck using Google or Wikipedia, so here goes.  I understand that ending a game in a tie is rare because generally they just stay in overtime until someone finally wins.  But is it possible to do so?  And if so, under what circumstances would it be likely?

In college football, there are multiple overtime periods until a winner is declared.

In pro football, during the regular season, if the receiving team kicks a field goal in overtime, the other team gets a chance to respond.  If Other Team scores a touchdown, they win.  If they make a field goal, the game goes on as they would be tied again.  If they fail to score, the original receiving team wins.

 But, if the teams are still tied after the 15 minute overtime, the game ends in a tie.  If the receiving team scores a touchdown, they win.

During the playoffs, by definition someone has to win, so there are unlimited overtimes.  For example,The Cleveland Browns finally defeated the NY Jets in double overtime in 1986, on their way to defeat by Denver in the AFC Championship Game.

Double overtime?  Pssh.  I once watched a quintuple overtime hockey game.  Eight hours, all in one stretch.  It was... well, kind of epic.
And then there's cricket. 5 days of play which may end in a draw (which is not the same as a tie). Mind you they do stop for morning and afternoon tea and lunch. /hijack

Victoria

Carotte

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1171
Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #9133 on: March 05, 2014, 08:42:07 AM »
I've been interviewed (waiting on an answer) for an entry level reception job at a sport gymnasium.
The duties are: greeting members (who have membership cards), selling  the yearly membership/monthly/one session ticket kind of stuff, selling the products they carry (related to sport), manning the coffee machine, setting up the appointments with trainers, answering questions about openings and times and stuff, at closing folding the equipment and making sure everything is in order.

They said the first two month are a training period and they don't think people are completely up and ready for 4 months. How is that even possible?
They usually hire college students, so young people who shouldn't have too much trouble with technology (for the few software they use) and thinking*.
I didn't say what I was thinking during the interview but I'm really puzzled at the 4 months remark.
I know it's part time, but 2 months is already 80H on the job!
So stupid question, am I totally out of it and that would seem normal or have they only been hiring Airhead Tom and Lazy Suzy?

*shouldn't is the key word here, but they should be exceptions no?

ETA: my SO is as pluzzled as I am and it's the gymnasium he's been going for a couple of years, twice a week, so he knows pretty well what they do (at least when customers are there).
« Last Edit: March 05, 2014, 08:43:59 AM by Carotte »

Dindrane

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 15439
Re: The "This Might Be A Stupid Question, But...." Thread
« Reply #9134 on: March 05, 2014, 09:02:38 AM »
It takes most people several months to feel like they really know what they are doing, no matter the job and no matter their intelligence/inherent ability to do it. The only thing that tends to shorten the initial learning curve is having done a similar job elsewhere. But even then, every organization does things differently, and no two jobs are exactly the same.

Based on what they said, I'd guess that it takes 2 months for the average employee in that position to be able to operate without assistance, i.e. answer standard questions without needing to consult others, know where supplies are stored, know what to do to close the gymnasium and fold equipment, be able to operate things like the coffee machine, etc. It would then take another 2 months for all of those tasks to become familiar rather than just possible, and to get some experience with handling unusual situations that don't come up very often.

If they normally hire college students, they're most likely hiring people with very little professional work experience. If you have more work experience doing similar types of jobs than the average college student hire, you might find you can adapt to the role more quickly. But it really all does come down to experience, and the more experience with this type of job a person has, the more likely they are to be able to secure a non-entry level job that probably pays better (and therefore be less interested in an entry-level one).