Author Topic: Musical Stockholm Syndrome  (Read 753 times)

1 Member and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Moralia

  • That's just tacky, tacky, tacky!
  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2201
Musical Stockholm Syndrome
« on: Yesterday at 09:43:27 AM »
I have my ipod set to shuffle all and some Frampton just came on, which reminded me to ask about this.

When I was a kid, we'd go over to help my Aunt with chores.  She would put her "Frampton Comes Alive!" CD in the player on repeat for hours at a time. Sometimes wandering over to replay "Do You Feel Like We Do", her favorite song on the album.

At first, I was indifferent.  Then I was tired of that song in particular. Then I really hated it.  Finally, in a strangely perverse way, I came around to really liking it again. To this day, it's an album that I listen to frequently and find kind of comforting.

Has anyone else done that with a song or album?

Yvaine

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 8712
Re: Musical Stockholm Syndrome
« Reply #1 on: Yesterday at 09:47:14 AM »
I do think familiarity can make us like something we initially dislike.

Music-wise, I always think of the song "Right Here, Right Now" by Jesus Jones, which was way overplayed on my usual station when it came out, and I couldn't stand it. Now, though, when I hear it, I'm like "Hey, it's a song from my youth!" I'm not sure if the repetition was what made me eventually like it, or the long absence before I heard it again.

It's happened to me with fashion too. A lot of times I'm like "Sublimation? Hi-low! Guh, this stuff is ugly" and then by the time I've seen it everywhere for six months, I start thinking it's cute. This is surely an evil marketing conspiracy.  ;)

daen

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 615
Re: Musical Stockholm Syndrome
« Reply #2 on: Yesterday at 10:32:58 AM »
I once went on a road trip (15 hours, if I remember correctly) where we had only one tape in the car: The Rovers' Christmas Album. Apparently "no music at all" wasn't an option, so we listened to the tape the entire way there. The opening to "Grandma Got Run Over by a Reindeer" began to trigger near-homicidal rage in me.

Somehow, over the years, I've come to quite like the song. I've included it on every mixtape/CD/playlist for road trips that I've taken with the driver of the Rovers Christmas Road Trip since that time.

MrTango

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2254
Re: Musical Stockholm Syndrome
« Reply #3 on: Yesterday at 10:43:12 AM »
The Shaker tune (i.e. "Simple Gifts")

In 10th grade, every band concert we played had something that quoted the shaker dance, culminating in John Zdechlik's "Chorale and Shaker Dance" for the spring concert.

For a long time, I hated that melody with a passion.  After a while, though, I started to really appreciate it.  Now, I hate singing anything that uses that melody, but I love listening to a good recording of "Chorale and Shaker Dance."

lowspark

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3663
Re: Musical Stockholm Syndrome
« Reply #4 on: Yesterday at 10:52:51 AM »
I'm pretty much the only person on this planet (and maybe in the entire universe if we included the album on Voyager) who doesn't like Pink Floyd's "Another Brick in the Wall". I've never liked it. But of course, I've heard it maybe seven million times. After a while it started to grow on me. A little bit. So I don't hate it as much as I used to. I still don't love it though.

***ETA: Great. Now I have that song stuck in my head.  ::)
« Last Edit: Yesterday at 10:56:04 AM by lowspark »

poundcake

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 986
Re: Musical Stockholm Syndrome
« Reply #5 on: Yesterday at 11:20:54 AM »
A lot of Britpop stuff. It was so overplayed at the time, and my husband and several friends were really into several of the Manchester bands. I thought I'd never be able to stand listening to them, but now, a few decades on, I really enjoy a lot of the music from the whole scene.

Morty'sCleaningLady

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3133
Re: Musical Stockholm Syndrome
« Reply #6 on: Yesterday at 11:28:27 AM »
Back in the summer of 91, I worked two jobs while home from college.  One was an early morning shift at McDonald's where I had to wash all of the back room greasy utensils for biscuit making/ egg rounds etc.  It was gross. 

That was the summer Natalie Cole released her duet with her deceased father, Nat King Cole.  The song was Unforgettable.  I hate it.  I see those nasty McDishes, smell the grease, and remember the damp polyester uniform that even two oilskin aprons couldn't keep dry. 

Oddly, Werewolves of London played every morning during biscuit prep and it doesn't bother me.  It's just dishwashing to Unforgettable that is regrettably unforgettable.
Formerly Mrs.Bart

Yvaine

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 8712
Re: Musical Stockholm Syndrome
« Reply #7 on: Yesterday at 11:32:00 AM »
Back in the summer of 91, I worked two jobs while home from college.  One was an early morning shift at McDonald's where I had to wash all of the back room greasy utensils for biscuit making/ egg rounds etc.  It was gross. 

That was the summer Natalie Cole released her duet with her deceased father, Nat King Cole.  The song was Unforgettable.  I hate it.  I see those nasty McDishes, smell the grease, and remember the damp polyester uniform that even two oilskin aprons couldn't keep dry. 

Oddly, Werewolves of London played every morning during biscuit prep and it doesn't bother me.  It's just dishwashing to Unforgettable that is regrettably unforgettable.

I heard Celine Dion's "To Love You More" once while waiting in a car outside Hardee's at 5am for the manager to show up and let me in for the early morning shift. Every time I hear that song, I flash right back to that morning and thank the powers that be that I don't have to make biscuits before the sun is up anymore.

siamesecat2965

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 8568
Re: Musical Stockholm Syndrome
« Reply #8 on: Yesterday at 12:36:44 PM »
I hated the Talking Heads in HS, when they were big (graduated in '84). Learned to love them in college, and still enjoy listening to them today.

Never was a fan of Led Zeppelin, i could maybe listen to Stairway to Heaven, but that was about it. Then, however many years back, within the last 10, I think, they started using some of their songs for Cadillac ads, and I was like, wow, i actually like them! Although they still fall under the category of band who I can only listen to a few songs at a time.

I used to love Billy Joel, James Taylor, that type of stuff. Then went through a period where I couldnt' stand them. I'm just now beginning to appreciate them again.

magicdomino

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4541
Re: Musical Stockholm Syndrome
« Reply #9 on: Yesterday at 04:09:33 PM »
I'm pretty much the only person on this planet (and maybe in the entire universe if we included the album on Voyager) who doesn't like Pink Floyd's "Another Brick in the Wall". I've never liked it. But of course, I've heard it maybe seven million times. After a while it started to grow on me. A little bit. So I don't hate it as much as I used to. I still don't love it though.

***ETA: Great. Now I have that song stuck in my head.  ::)

No, you're not.  However, I still can't tolerate anything by Pink Floyd.   :)

However, there are quite a few songs that I hated when they were hits and were played once an hour, every hour.  After a few years to recover, it's "Huh.  I remember that song played when the living room was painted/we went on a day trip/during that Christmas."

lowspark

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3663
Re: Musical Stockholm Syndrome
« Reply #10 on: Yesterday at 04:22:55 PM »
I'm pretty much the only person on this planet (and maybe in the entire universe if we included the album on Voyager) who doesn't like Pink Floyd's "Another Brick in the Wall". I've never liked it. But of course, I've heard it maybe seven million times. After a while it started to grow on me. A little bit. So I don't hate it as much as I used to. I still don't love it though.

***ETA: Great. Now I have that song stuck in my head.  ::)

No, you're not.  However, I still can't tolerate anything by Pink Floyd.   :)

However, there are quite a few songs that I hated when they were hits and were played once an hour, every hour.  After a few years to recover, it's "Huh.  I remember that song played when the living room was painted/we went on a day trip/during that Christmas."

Thank you for validating my experience!  ;D So hey, there are two of us!

Sirius

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 9733
  • Stars in my eyes!
Re: Musical Stockholm Syndrome
« Reply #11 on: Yesterday at 05:24:38 PM »
Three.  I don't like Pink Floyd, either.

I never liked David Bowie that much, but there are a few of his songs that have grown on me over the years, like "Changes."  Mr. Sirius likes him, so I've been subjected to his music.  (He asked me once if he could use my CD player to listen to some music while he painted the steps.  I told him not to offend the neighbors, so he chose the Andrews Sisters.)

guihong

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6448
Re: Musical Stockholm Syndrome
« Reply #12 on: Yesterday at 09:14:00 PM »
This has happened thrice, all tied to the China summer:

#1: Traditional Chinese "pop" music.  The most popular form were treacly love songs, so sappy they would give someone cavities.  It started on the airplane before we even landed, and never let up.  Many of my students gave me tapes of the stuff.  It went from barely tolerable to rage after eight weeks.  Now, over a decade past, I found myself playing that music again and thinking it's all right but not my favorite.  It's similar to Japanese enka music.

#2: The Carpenters' Yesterday Once More.  Before that summer, this was one of my favorite songs from one of my favorite groups.  For some inexplicable reason, this had to be the most popular song in China.  After uncounted off-key karaoke performances, I loathed that tune with a passion.  Now, it's back on my playlist and I think it's nostalgia that is drawing me back into love with it.

#3: Phil Collins: One More Night.  Same summer.  This one used to be on my "like" list until it was so overplayed all that time there.  It was even in Muzak form.  That song, unlike the Carpenters, never recovered from loathing.