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  • May 05, 2016, 11:20:29 AM

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Author Topic: Not Going To Happen 'Cause I'm Not Harry Potter (Impossible Patron Requests)  (Read 993853 times)

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chi2kcldy

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The teller offered change for the $20 but he only wanted $10 from his account.

About an hour after this guy leaves a lady comes in for a home equity loan for a house she is renting. It took the loan officer about 30 minutes to finally get this lady to understand you must own the home in order to qualify for a home equity loan.

She did not believe him and left in a huff.

« Last Edit: April 28, 2016, 02:36:26 PM by chi2kcldy »

rose red

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I miss the days when ATM's can give you $5 and $10. I guess that's my impossible request ;)

chi2kcldy

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I miss the days when ATM's can give you $5 and $10. I guess that's my impossible request ;)


Me too  ;D

DoubleTrouble

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I miss the days when ATM's can give you $5 and $10. I guess that's my impossible request ;)

Me too  ;D

The ones around my area will give you $1s, $5s, $10s & $20s!

shortstuff

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I miss the days when ATM's can give you $5 and $10. I guess that's my impossible request ;)

Me too  ;D

The ones around my area will give you $1s, $5s, $10s & $20s!

I always request $35 or $55 from ATMs, and it usually works out for me.  Sometimes the self-checkouts at grocery stores won't let me pick that combo, they're request cashback in any combo of $20s. 

I feel for the gentleman, thinking of all the reasons he didn't want to take more money out of his account, but the purchase/cashback option is always what I suggested when I worked at a grocery store (without any ATM!).  Most people picked up 99 cent gum and got their money. 

Quote
About an hour after this guy leaves a lady comes in for a home equity loan for a house she is renting. It took the loan officer about 30 minutes to finally get this lady to understand you must own the home in order to qualify for a home equity loan.

She did not believe him and left in a huff.

This is just gold.  There is a string of stories on Not Always Right with the shared title "And This Is Why We're In A Recession."  I think this qualifies! 

chi2kcldy

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I admit, I'm sheltered working in my cubicle at the corporate office. It's been years since I've had face to face customer interaction. I tip my hat to everyone working in the customer service field. This is my third day at the bank and I am so ready to retreat back to my cubicle.
« Last Edit: April 29, 2016, 08:50:38 AM by chi2kcldy »

FauxFoodist

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I admit, I'm sheltered working in my cubicle at the corporate office. It's been years since I've had face to face customer interaction. I tip my hat to everyone working in the customer service field. This is my third day at the bank and I am so ready to retreat back to my cubicle.

Between external customer service (dealing with the public) and internal customer service (dealing with those working for my same employer and in my department), I've found I'd rather deal with external customer service as those you usually only deal with once then they go away.  The internal ones are trickier, and the buttheads really never go away.

whiterose

  • From the good old US of A!
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This may seem like simply a special snowflake at first, but the fact that the timing made the request even harder puts it into Harry Potter territory.

Background info: public libraries in my county close at 6PM on Fridays.

Young man comes in around 5:30 PM on a Friday. He asks me if all libraries closed at 6PM on Fridays- I said yes.

He said he needed an individual study room for himself for a few hours. He asked me if I knew of any place that provided individual study rooms.

I tried the local community college library- closed already until Saturday.

I tried the local universities- one was closed, the other one did not allow individual students to get study rooms by themselves (he went there- he knew ahead of time). Tutoring centers were not an option either.

So he kept asking me to find him a place that had individual study rooms for random people. He would not take NO for an answer. It's almost as if he wanted me to either extend library hours just for him, or magically make a study hall appear out of the blue.

 The library could have 100 meeting rooms- and they would all still be booked solid every single day. We could close at midnight- and patrons would still be there.

I have pet mice!

Thipu1

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We would have similar things happen on a regular basis. There were semi-regular readers who would come to NYC two or three times a year to spend a few days doing research in the library. 

We opened at 10 AM but these folks would be waiting outside when I reported for work at 8:30.  Of course they wanted to come in and start work while I was turning on the lights.  I understood their love of the place but it was a real imposition. 

We also closed for an hour so the boss and I could have a decent lunch.  These folks either wanted to  continue working while we were closed or invited themselves to lunch with one of us and picked our brains the entire hour. 

At closing time, they wanted to hang around and continue chatting for an hour or so.  We had homes to go to and dinners to make.

There was one time I really had to put my foot down.  Because of the traffic in and out of the library all day during the week, I got into the habit of coming in on Saturdays to spend a few quiet hours getting caught up on library business.  One reader found out about this and showed up at the door with a happy, greedy smile. 

Sorry, ain't gonna happen.   

Luci

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We would have similar things happen on a regular basis. There were semi-regular readers who would come to NYC two or three times a year to spend a few days doing research in the library. 

We opened at 10 AM but these folks would be waiting outside when I reported for work at 8:30.  Of course they wanted to come in and start work while I was turning on the lights.  I understood their love of the place but it was a real imposition. 

We also closed for an hour so the boss and I could have a decent lunch.  These folks either wanted to  continue working while we were closed or invited themselves to lunch with one of us and picked our brains the entire hour. 

At closing time, they wanted to hang around and continue chatting for an hour or so.  We had homes to go to and dinners to make.

There was one time I really had to put my foot down.  Because of the traffic in and out of the library all day during the week, I got into the habit of coming in on Saturdays to spend a few quiet hours getting caught up on library business.  One reader found out about this and showed up at the door with a happy, greedy smile. 

Sorry, ain't gonna happen.   

I've never heard of a library closed for lunch hour or on Saturday except my elementary school library. Even the middle school and high school libraries were always open for lunch hour. We just took turns taking our breaks and lunch. Public or university? Never!

I do agre that it is awful to expect you to take care of patrons outside of hours! People just don't understand that materials need to be ordered, catalogued, repaired, returned to circulation, etc, as well as remote requests handled apart from taking care of patrons. Now that is looking for Harry Potter!

Thipu1

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This was a very specialized library in a museum.  The only staff members were the librarian and I to do everything with a collection of about 50,000 titles.  Some of those titles were full runs of scholarly journals going back to the late 18th century. 

The library also had open stacks. On these were rare volumes dating from the 16th century. Although at least one title was one of only three complete collations known in the world, we had no rare book room.  We didn't even have a cage.

  This would be enough to give any librarian a case of the screaming-meemees.  We had to be very careful.   
« Last Edit: May 01, 2016, 02:07:51 PM by Thipu1 »

Luci

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This was a very specialized library in a museum.  The only staff members were the librarian and me to do everything with a collection of about 50,000 titles.  Some of those titles were full runs of scholarly journals going back to the late 18th century. 

The library also had open stacks. On these were rare volumes dating from the 16th century. Although at least one title was one of only three complete collations known in the world, we had no rare book room.  We didn't even have a cage.

  This would be enough to give any librarian a case of the screaming-meemees.  We had to be very careful.

WOW!

Open stacks! Yes, you had best keep an eye on those patrons.

Thanks for telling me about it. I'm just a bit envious.