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  • March 28, 2015, 10:53:17 AM

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Author Topic: Cats and shedding  (Read 1060 times)

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mechtilde

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Re: Cats and shedding
« Reply #15 on: March 17, 2015, 02:08:49 PM »
Outdoor/indoor cats could actually shed more, especially if they are semi longhairs, or any other sort of cat which gets a thicker coat in winter.
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jmarvellous

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Re: Cats and shedding
« Reply #16 on: March 17, 2015, 03:31:43 PM »
Our shelter would not give cats to people who were going to make them live outdoors. It halves their life expectancy and can be a real nuisance, at least in any urban or suburban environment. (They had a special program for critters deemed firm "barn cats.")

I am pretty strongly in the indoor-only camp for almost all cats, as well. That said, I have had to make some changes to my lifestyle for my white-and-charcoal kitty. I have begun putting on black pants or coats just a few minutes before I leave the apartment, for example, so that they don't get furry. I also hang dark clothes in the closet right away, rather than leaving them sitting out. Apparently they are instant nesting spots!

We also sweep or vacuum more than we otherwise would, and shake out rugs often, too. We have a throw blanket over the top of the couch because it's one of her favorite perches, and it makes it easier to clean the couch if we can just take off the blanket. Litter and food aren't a big deal, but we do spend more than the minimum for quality products because we have to keep the litter box in our living room (no other spot for it in our 600-square-foot apartment) and I couldn't handle it being stinky in my living space; food with good ingredients is a no-brainer once you've read anything about the many pet food recalls.

In all, a couple of good lint brushes at every exit, and daily litter cleaning and food-filling are just about the only major negatives of having a cat (oh, and occasional vet bills).

The rest is fun and/or combat!

Twik

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Re: Cats and shedding
« Reply #17 on: March 17, 2015, 04:07:23 PM »
Well, don't forget the Song of Their People at inconvenient times, like 3 am.
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Lynn2000

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Re: Cats and shedding
« Reply #18 on: March 17, 2015, 04:13:53 PM »
We actually had a spot for our cats in "the back of the garage," which was a large heated space with the laundry, water heater, etc.. It was closed off from the car portion of the garage with a door, so you had to open two doors to let the cats into the house. They had beds, food, litter, etc. in there. We always put them there at night so they weren't running around the house bothering us.

Obviously that's pretty specific to the house I grew up in. But I personally wouldn't have cats again, unless I had a room to put them in at night, because I couldn't stand them walking around at night making noise or knocking things over. (A friend's cat once got on top of his fridge at 3am and knocked all his liquor bottles onto the floor.)

My last cat had long, white fur. That definitely got everywhere! It seemed worse in the summer. But the short-haired cats we had before, I don't remember it being nearly such a problem. Of course I was younger then too.
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katycoo

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Re: Cats and shedding
« Reply #19 on: March 17, 2015, 06:15:33 PM »
My 2 are indoor/outdoor.  We only let them outside when we are home and during the day, and the little one doesn't leave the backyard.  The big one does but he doesn't go far and we live on a very quiet culdesac.  They are generaly quite good at coming when called and rarely have issues getting them back inside. 

We originally wanted them to be solely indoor cats but they love outside so much that even being aware of the increased risks, its a quality of life decision for us.  Our area is also low for predators so that's another things we didn't have to worry about.

malfoyfan13

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Re: Cats and shedding
« Reply #20 on: March 17, 2015, 08:37:27 PM »
Some random thoughts about cats after having owned 12 over the past 50 years.

Shedding is a fact of life for almost any cat except the Sphinx.  If you don't like fur in your environment, don't get a cat.  I currently have two and am cleaning up fur CONSTANTLY.  We have both carpet and hardwood floors.  It's a lot of work.

Siamese are VERY loud and vocal and in your face.  I don't recommend getting one unless you enjoy this.  I have had a half-Siamese cat and she was amazingly loud.  I loved her to death but could have lived without the noise at times, especially in the middle of the night.

Short hair doesn't mean no shedding.  I've had longhaired cats (Birmans) who barely shed and my current cat Sam has shortish hair and sheds all. the. time.  I can brush him for 20 minutes and he's still shedding.

Furballs.  Need I say more.  Not fun.  Also a fact of life, even with frequent brushing.

I am not an advocate of outdoor cats.  Between predators (yes, even in the suburbs), disease and cars, their lives tend to be short.  I have had both and highly recommend keeping them indoors at all times.  The last three cats I've owned have lived 17, 20 and 20 years respectively.  Yearly vet visits and no outdoors keeps them healthy.

Also not an advocate of de-clawing.  It's not necessary.

Vet visits are expensive.  If you don't want to take the cat to the vet or pay for it, don't get a cat.  They need care just like we do, including dental care.  And as they age, it gets more expensive.

Life span: if you're not prepared to take care of the cat for 20 years, don't get one.  They can and do live that long.  It's a big commitment. 

Having said all this, I love my cats, all of them living and dead.  I would not have had it any other way.   My husband says these two are our last ones, but he's in for a surprise.   ;)


GreenEyedHawk

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Re: Cats and shedding
« Reply #21 on: March 17, 2015, 08:38:33 PM »
 A high quality diet and regular brushing are the two biggest things to preventing shedding from becoming excessive.  Unless you get a hairless cat or curlier-coated breed like a Devon Rex, there's going to be shedding, no matter what.

I am lucky in that both my cats adore being brushed so keeping it under control isn't too bad.

If you do get a cat and find you're having a hard time coping with shedding, please do not consider having them shaved.  It's only a very temporary solution and the only thing that will change is that they just shed smaller hair.  Also their coat growing back in can sometimes cause them to shed even MORE.  It can also be a little risky to shave a cat; it deprives them of any natural protection their coat was giving them, plus cat skin is much more fragile than a dog's.  The chances of them being nicked or their skin tearing during a shear-down is higher than for a dog.

If you decide to get a kitten, get them used to brushing right from the start.  He/she may never come to enjoy it, but at the very least it helps if they'll tolerate it.
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daen

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Re: Cats and shedding
« Reply #22 on: March 18, 2015, 11:03:34 AM »
A high quality diet and regular brushing are the two biggest things to preventing shedding from becoming excessive.  Unless you get a hairless cat or curlier-coated breed like a Devon Rex, there's going to be shedding, no matter what.

I am lucky in that both my cats adore being brushed so keeping it under control isn't too bad.

If you do get a cat and find you're having a hard time coping with shedding, please do not consider having them shaved.  It's only a very temporary solution and the only thing that will change is that they just shed smaller hair.  Also their coat growing back in can sometimes cause them to shed even MORE.  It can also be a little risky to shave a cat; it deprives them of any natural protection their coat was giving them, plus cat skin is much more fragile than a dog's.  The chances of them being nicked or their skin tearing during a shear-down is higher than for a dog.

If you decide to get a kitten, get them used to brushing right from the start.  He/she may never come to enjoy it, but at the very least it helps if they'll tolerate it.

And if they don't like one kind of brush, try another. Bear loves any kind of brushing, but Her Ladyship wasn't having any of it. I started with a rubber oval with short nubs on it, and she left after one stroke. I tried again with a slicker brush, and that was no better. I got a rubber brush with longer bristles, and that she'd tolerate for about four strokes. So I gave up. Later, I tried the Furminator, mostly because I needed one to try to keep Bear from developing hairballs with annoying regularity. To my surprise, the first time I tried it on Her Ladyship, she hung around for a good five minutes, and her tolerance keeps getting better.

By the way, if anyone has any tips for how to keep a cat in a position where you can groom the parts you want to groom, let me know. Bear is not an issue - once he gets over the initial joy of being brushed, he flops down on his side. When I need to start on the other side, I take his front paws in one hand, his back paws in the other, and roll him over onto his other side. He takes this with complete equanimity.
Her Ladyship, on the other hand, always lies down on her left side, and does not tolerate the indignity of being flipped, so her right side always gets more attention than her left.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Cats and shedding
« Reply #23 on: March 18, 2015, 11:07:21 AM »
We had a cat that would let my mother vacuum him!  And she would do the same thing - grab all four paws and flip him over to do the other side.

My current two?  Run as soon as the vacuum is turned on.
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Ms_Cellany

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Re: Cats and shedding
« Reply #24 on: March 18, 2015, 11:12:48 AM »
Get a cat that matches your furniture.

Groom cat often. Furminators are expensive, but amazingly effective.

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daen

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Re: Cats and shedding
« Reply #25 on: March 18, 2015, 11:16:28 AM »
We had a cat that would let my mother vacuum him!  And she would do the same thing - grab all four paws and flip him over to do the other side.

My current two?  Run as soon as the vacuum is turned on.

Bear runs from the vaccuum, too.
Her Ladyship, on the other hand, prefers a high vantage point from which to supervise the vaccuuming. I have my doubts that she would allow me to bring it into her personal space, though...

Get a cat that matches your furniture.

Groom cat often. Furminators are expensive, but amazingly effective.

My local Walmart has a knockoff that was a quarter of the price I paid for mine. It's not quite as good (I bought one for my parents' cats), but it's close, and might be worth it as a trial run or a stopgap if you're low on disposable income.

mlogica

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Re: Cats and shedding
« Reply #26 on: March 18, 2015, 01:53:28 PM »
...
Shedding is a fact of life for almost any cat except the Sphinx.  If you don't like fur in your environment, don't get a cat.  I currently have two and am cleaning up fur CONSTANTLY.  We have both carpet and hardwood floors.  It's a lot of work.
...
Short hair doesn't mean no shedding. ..

Furballs.  Need I say more.  Not fun.  Also a fact of life, even with frequent brushing.

I am not an advocate of outdoor cats.  Between predators (yes, even in the suburbs), disease and cars, their lives tend to be short.  I have had both and highly recommend keeping them indoors at all times.  ...  Yearly vet visits and no outdoors keeps them healthy.

Also not an advocate of de-clawing.  It's not necessary.

Vet visits are expensive.  If you don't want to take the cat to the vet or pay for it, don't get a cat.  They need care just like we do, including dental care.  And as they age, it gets more expensive.

Life span: if you're not prepared to take care of the cat for 20 years, don't get one.  They can and do live that long.  It's a big commitment. 

Having said all this, I love my cats, all of them living and dead.  I would not have had it any other way.   ...

Yes, all of this (snipped the parts that don't quite match up).  We have three cats - two are older (12, 13) and one is just a kid (3).  They are living creatures who we chose to bring into our home, and, as such, we owe them the best care and quality of life we can provide.  And although we do our best to keep the fur under control, they are cats and they shed, and that's just the way it is.  Right now I know that Spring is on the way because little kitty fur tumbleweeds just keep appearing.  Those of you with cats know exactly what I mean. :)

Cali.in.UK

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Re: Cats and shedding
« Reply #27 on: March 18, 2015, 02:59:12 PM »
I'm in a relevant situation that might make my two cents helpful. I'm a non-cat owner and I'm house sitting/cat sitting for a month. Here are a few things I've noticed as someone who does not have a cat who is now in a cat environment:
Cons for me: The house is clean but every time I sit down or have my clothes brush against something, there is cat fur stuck on me. I've designated certain clothes for wearing around the house so that I can limit the amount of clothes covered in cat hair. I'm not allergic to cats but the constant shedding (or something else in the house, not completely sure) is making my nose a little ticklish.
Pros for me: The cats are really sweet and friendly and it's been enjoyable taking care of them and witnessing their cute personality traits.

Vall

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Re: Cats and shedding
« Reply #28 on: March 18, 2015, 05:04:51 PM »
We have seven indoor-only cats (a small herd?).  There are three pairs of siblings and one without a sibling.  All are DSH except one which is medium hair.  Yes, we have cat hair but it's not bad.  Really.  We brush the cats, use lint brushes and rollers.  Our living room furniture is a thick leather so hair doesn't stick.  Even before they were declawed none were ever interested in the smooth leather anyway.  Some fabrics pick up cat hair quicker than others so we keep that in mind when buying things.  For example, we would never buy a velvet comforter or curtains.  We feed them a high quality food and I think that helps too.

Each cat has different shedding habits.  Just because two cats are litter mates does not mean that they will shed the same way/amount.  There are a lot of pros and cons to owning kitties but cat hair would be near the bottom of my con list.  Vet bills can be expensive.  Scratches happen and they hurt.  One accidentally scratched my foot a couple days ago.  Since I heal very slowly, that little scratch will take a couple of months to heal :'(

Hairballs happen.  Litter boxes aren't fun.  We can't have blinds because the cats tear them up.  No lilies in the house (poisonous).  Actually, any plant will be chewed/dug up/knocked down.  But for us it is absolutely worth it.  There is always a kitty snuggling up with each of us, wanting to be petted.  I have three in bed with me right now.  There's nothing like dozing off to the sound of a content kitty purring.  They add so much to our lives every day that I can't even imagine being without them.