Etiquette School is in session! > "I'm afraid that won't be possible."

No, I will not notarize your blank document

<< < (9/9)

White Lotus:
In the US, both lawyers and notaries can certify a copy of a document, but of course the notary must see both the original and the copy.  This is usually used for documents going to countries where notaries are also lawyers, generally, but not always, in Latin America, where there is only one original or getting a duplicate original is expensive and a pain.  Sometimes, however, even an official copy (birth, marriage, death certificates and the like) must also be certified by a lawyer or notary.  I have never heard of that being done for US-Canada or US-US documents, but of course every place has its own rules.

katycoo:

--- Quote from: White Lotus on January 02, 2013, 06:03:09 PM ---In the US, both lawyers and notaries can certify a copy of a document, but of course the notary must see both the original and the copy.  This is usually used for documents going to countries where notaries are also lawyers, generally, but not always, in Latin America, where there is only one original or getting a duplicate original is expensive and a pain.  Sometimes, however, even an official copy (birth, marriage, death certificates and the like) must also be certified by a lawyer or notary.  I have never heard of that being done for US-Canada or US-US documents, but of course every place has its own rules.

--- End quote ---

Its similar here, but notarising a copy is different to certifying one.  Better, somehow.  I can't notarise.  I do believe it has links to international things.  Most (if not all?) notaries are lawyers here.  Lots of connections with shipping law I think.

Margo:
It sounds as though a lot of the stuff which requires a notary in the US would require a commissioner for oaths here in the UK -
- Administering an oath / statutory declaration- 5 + 2 per exhibit
- certified copies - no set fee - we usually do it free for our own clients, or charge 10 or 1 per page, whichever is higher,for non-clients.

I've definitely have brain-hurty conversations with people who don't understand that I can't (and won't) certify a copy without seeing the original document. And at least one who was most upset I wouldn't do the Statutory Declaration he'd brought it. He explained that his wife had signed it, he's declaring that it's her signature, and he can'see why I won't sign it ..

Barney girl:

--- Quote from: Margo on February 07, 2013, 04:18:06 PM ---It sounds as though a lot of the stuff which requires a notary in the US would require a commissioner for oaths here in the UK -
- Administering an oath / statutory declaration- 5 + 2 per exhibit
- certified copies - no set fee - we usually do it free for our own clients, or charge 10 or 1 per page, whichever is higher,for non-clients.

I've definitely have brain-hurty conversations with people who don't understand that I can't (and won't) certify a copy without seeing the original document. And at least one who was most upset I wouldn't do the Statutory Declaration he'd brought it. He explained that his wife had signed it, he's declaring that it's her signature, and he can'see why I won't sign it ..

--- End quote ---

The fact that most matters are ones which would require a commissioner for oaths in the UK and the ridiculously low fees (they've not been increased since about the time I qualified in 1989!) means that where someone does need a notary they have brain hurty conversations, because some expect to be charged at that sort of level, whereas I'm entitled, as a notary, to charge a commercial rate, which I base on the time I expect to spend on the job and my hourly rate as a solicitor. It's particularly difficult for those who come across from the US where notaries are so different.

Margo:
I have every sympathy.

I usually have that type of conversation with people who don't (want to) get that there is a difference between me administering an oath or stat dec, and me either preparing or advising about the contents of an affidavit or stat dec.
I've have people get really huffy when I explain that no, they don't get detailed legal advice or drafting for  5!

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[*] Previous page

Go to full version