News: There is a new Ehell Kindness Project!  Check it out in the "Extending the Hand of Kindness" folder or here: http://www.etiquettehell.com/smf/index.php?topic=139832.msg3372084#msg3372084   

  • September 26, 2016, 02:20:57 AM

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch  (Read 178621 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Diane AKA Traska

  • Member
  • Posts: 5687
  • Or you can just call me Diane. (NE USA EHellion)
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #1500 on: July 16, 2016, 09:14:02 PM »
It might be appropriate if they were talking about computer *games* I suppose! Those are often shooters, after all...

You wouldn't be the first person to make that observation. ;)
Location:
Philadelphia, PA

Margo

  • Member
  • Posts: 2539
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #1501 on: July 25, 2016, 07:46:49 AM »
Days Weeks like this make me feel for people who work with the postal service, in a mail room, etc.

I have an online form I manage for my university. People fill it out to get information. The form is set up with mandatory fields, and optional fields.

For street address, most people enter their address like this 1234 Main Street and then some add their apartment number, and some put it in the apartment field.

Others enter things like this:
* Main Street, then 1234 in the apartment number box.
* 1234 Main Street Maintown, NY 00097 (in the street address box).
* 1234 Main Street Apt A Apartment complex name
* 1234 Main Street Zip code

Even better are the ones who put their email in that box, and I can't process their info request without that information.

Some of thos may be auto fill errors (although of course the person filling in the form should check)

On a related note, I get irritated by the type of form which won't let you manually fill in your own address, but which insistes on you giving your post code and house number so it can 'find' your address.
Why? Because it would appear that the database used by most of the organisations which use this type of form is wrong.
If I input my address, it places my home (a) in a town I don't live in, and which is not part of my address. (this is not fatal, as long as my post code and the name of the village ar there, things will reach m,e, but it is irritating) (b) in a county which no longer exists, having ben abolished in 1996, and which my house was not in even when it did exist!
Double frustration when the form doesn't allow you to manually correct errors. The last twice I have bought insurance (house nad car) I've had to phone the insurance company becuase even though I corrected the address on the online application, it defaulted back to the wrong details on the paperwork.

My parents have a similar issue in that their postcode gives the wrong outcome on a lot of sat-nav devices, which makes it very dificult to get delivaries. (most delivery drivers, it appears, don't read the additional notes which warn of this and expalin where the house is)

#borecore

  • Member
  • Posts: 4857
  • Extreme normcore
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #1502 on: July 25, 2016, 08:55:04 AM »
I live at 1 My Road, Faketown. Faketown is not a political entity, but it is a geographical one. Our town services are run by Bigtown. There is also a 1 My Road, Bigtown. And a 1 My Road, Otherfaketown. And a 1 My Road, Suburb. And a 1 My Road, Othersuburb. And a 1 My Road, Exurb.
And basically every single town in my state has a building at my address because originality is apparently not our strong suit. It's not as if "My Road" is a stand-in for Main Street, either.

It drives me crazy when people hear "1 My Road" and stop listening. I have to reiterate. "Faketown. ZIP 11111. Not Bigtown. No, that ZIP is the Bigtown address. I promise." Every time. In cabs, to movers, to city officials handling paperwork, to anyone mailing anything or coming to visit.

Of course, now that I'm moving, we chose a house on a street with a name that's unique in the state. However, it's one word that sounds like it should be two words, partly in another language, and so far everyone has messed it up, too. Our solution here, at least, is just to spell it every time, rather than say it and confuse people.

o_gal

  • Member
  • Posts: 1078
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #1503 on: August 24, 2016, 06:11:26 AM »
From the Professional Darwinism thread - I hope this reporter and his/her editor face just a slight amount of PD:

http://www.clickorlando.com/news/pulse-orlando-shooting/hospital-employees-access-files-of-pulse-victims

No, not the story itself, which is PD for those involved. Note how many times the reporter uses a particular acronym, which is not the acronym for the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act.

Dazi

  • like the flower
  • Member
  • Posts: 5414
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #1504 on: September 16, 2016, 10:07:06 PM »
From the Professional Darwinism thread - I hope this reporter and his/her editor face just a slight amount of PD:

http://www.clickorlando.com/news/pulse-orlando-shooting/hospital-employees-access-files-of-pulse-victims

No, not the story itself, which is PD for those involved. Note how many times the reporter uses a particular acronym, which is not the acronym for the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act.

Um. Wow???
Meditate. Live purely. Quiet the mind. Do your work with mastery. Like the moon, come out from behind the clouds! Shine. ---Gautama Buddah





iridaceae

  • Boring in real life as well
  • Member
  • Posts: 4413
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #1505 on: September 17, 2016, 02:36:08 AM »
For some reason I see HIPPA a lot instead of HIPAA. I don't even blink any more.
Nothing to see here.

baglady

  • Member
  • Posts: 5024
  • A big lass and a bonny lass and she loves her beer
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #1506 on: September 20, 2016, 08:50:27 PM »
I get the feeling that the reporter has either never heard of HIPAA, has never seen it written down, or is under the mistaken impression that it's the Health Insurance Patient Privacy Act, hence HIPPA, not the Health Insurance Privacy and Accountability Act. That's a fairly easy misconception, because the act really is about respecting patients' privacy rights.

Where both the reporter and his editor fell down on the job is not including an explanation of what the acronym stands for in the story. That's Newswriting 101, even if the acronym is as well known as IRS or SPCA. And spelling out what it stands for would make it clear which acronym is correct.

GED is my downfall. It stands for General Educational Development, and it refers to the exams one takes to earn the equivalent of a high-school diploma. Even though I am a veteran copy editor, my brain still insists on interpreting it as Graduate Equivalency Diploma. Maybe that's because a person who passes the exams is referred to as having "gotten his GED."

I had a co-worker who is even more of a word nerd than I am, and she "corrected" my use of "chaise longue" to "chaise lounge." She was very gracious when I set her straight, but since then I've avoided the term altogether. When editing copy I change any mention of a "chaise lounge" to "lounge chair."

Another fellow word nerd always misspells "camaraderie" as "comradery." Natural mistake, since camaraderie makes people feel like comrades.
My photography is on Redbubble! Come see: http://www.redbubble.com/people/baglady

Slartibartfast

  • Member
  • Posts: 12441
    • Nerdy Necklaces - my Etsy shop!
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #1507 on: September 20, 2016, 11:08:50 PM »
I had a co-worker who is even more of a word nerd than I am, and she "corrected" my use of "chaise longue" to "chaise lounge." She was very gracious when I set her straight, but since then I've avoided the term altogether. When editing copy I change any mention of a "chaise lounge" to "lounge chair."

"Chaise longue/lounge" is one of those annoying words that kinda-sorta changed for American English, but not really. I'm never sure whether it's "chase lounge" or "chez lawge" and the internet doesn't help so I just avoid mentioning it when I can  :P (Which is tough, because we have two of them in the house and I use mine a LOT.)

Another Sarah

  • Member
  • Posts: 890
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #1508 on: September 21, 2016, 05:54:48 AM »
I had a co-worker who is even more of a word nerd than I am, and she "corrected" my use of "chaise longue" to "chaise lounge." She was very gracious when I set her straight, but since then I've avoided the term altogether. When editing copy I change any mention of a "chaise lounge" to "lounge chair."

"Chaise longue/lounge" is one of those annoying words that kinda-sorta changed for American English, but not really. I'm never sure whether it's "chase lounge" or "chez lawge" and the internet doesn't help so I just avoid mentioning it when I can  :P (Which is tough, because we have two of them in the house and I use mine a LOT.)

This might be a transatlantic disconnect, but if it helps the way I've always seen and heard it pronounced in the UK is "chez lowng" - as in the original French: chaise longue=long chair.
Chaise lounge to me would be a misspelling or a corruption of the word (even though you lounge on a longue, if you follow me.)

Mal

  • Member
  • Posts: 492
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #1509 on: September 21, 2016, 05:57:01 AM »
I'm always tempted to bite into the reference desk when a library patron asks me if we have this or that "triology"  >:(

Outdoor Girl

  • Member
  • Posts: 16980
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #1510 on: September 21, 2016, 07:27:58 AM »
I just call it a chaise and be done with it.   ;D
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
Ontario

Addy

  • Member
  • Posts: 692
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #1511 on: September 21, 2016, 11:42:53 PM »
I just call it a chaise and be done with it.   ;D

What I'm finding funny is that I mentioned chaise longue on page 97 and nobody noticed. Now it's a hot topic!  ;)

Another Sarah

  • Member
  • Posts: 890
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #1512 on: September 22, 2016, 03:54:34 AM »
I just call it a chaise and be done with it.   ;D

What I'm finding funny is that I mentioned chaise longue on page 97 and nobody noticed. Now it's a hot topic!  ;)
You're just ahead of the pack Addy!

Redneck Gravy

  • Member
  • Posts: 3445
Re: Grammar and spellling that make you twitch
« Reply #1513 on: September 22, 2016, 08:58:38 AM »
In our Redneck family, it was chaise lounger     ::)