Hostesses With The Mostest > Entertaining and Hospitality

I'm allergic to your sandwich

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shygirl:
I just remembered something weird that happened about a year ago.

I had just made myself a mozzarella, basil and tomato sandwich.  (The basil and tomato were fresh from someone's garden, so it was DE-licious!)  I was sitting at the kitchen table, eating it, when one of my husband's friend, D, showed up.  D is the one who had previously tried to fight me on my no-shoes inside policy.  For a while, he got around this rule by staying in the kitchen/entrance area that is not carpeted. I let this go because we live in a small condo, and the entrance area is basically the kitchen.

Since my husband was a little busy for a few minutes before he could see D, he sat with me at the kitchen table.  He asked me what I was eating, so I told him.  Then, he asked if I remembered his "allergy" to dairy products.  I say "allergy", because his wife had confided in me privately, that she's pretty sure he's making it up.  As long as he doesn't know that butter has been used in the food, he's okay.  I personally wouldn't do that do someone, but she's his wife.  Also, at my wedding, my mom made a traditional Indian chicken dish, that is marinated in yogurt.  D thought it was fabulous and is always trying to get me to get the recipe for the dish.  This was before I knew of his supposed allergy, otherwise I would have told him before he started eating.

Anyway, I said sure, you don't eat dairy products.  He said it was so bad that he couldn't even be in the same room as dairy products.  I admit that I didn't like D that much back then, so I wasn't inclined to throw away my fabulous sandwich for an uninvited guest with a pretend allergy.  So I said, you seem to be doing okay.  And I continued eating.  After I was done, I left and went to the other room.  Fortunately, my husband was done with whatever he was doing, and was able to join his friend.

What would you have done in this situation?  I didn't really want to move from the table, and unless D took his shoes off, there was nowhere else for him to go.  (I know how volatile the shoe issue is.  Please let's not make this a discussion about that.  D knows about the shoe policy at my house.)  I probably should have said "Oh sorry, I'll go eat in the living room then", and then let him sit by himself in the kitchen.

Summrs:
Since you know it's a fake allergy and you weren't purposely making him sick, I'd say you did fine.  You refused to give in to his manipulation and that's never a bad thing.

sparksals:
So, he expected you to put away the sandwich you were eating before he came over?  This guy is a piece of work. 

Harriet Jones:
I'd say you were fine, also.  He's an adult and is responsible for his own health, whether the allergy is real or not.  Also, I've never heard of a dairy allergy so bad they were worried about airborne particles  ::)

wheeitsme:

--- Quote from: shygirl on July 03, 2007, 03:11:30 PM ---He said it was so bad that he couldn't even be in the same room as dairy products.

--- End quote ---

Excuse me?

An allergy refers to an exaggerated reaction by our immune system in response to bodily contact with certain foreign substances.  There must be bodily contact.  Just being in the same room as an allergen will not cause a response. Pet dander?  Microscopic - so the more there is in the smaller the space, the more likely the response.  Same with pollens.  But dairy?  Its structure is such that even if it was small enough to get airborn, it wouldn't stay airborn for long.

According to my doctor, I'm allergic to everything that grows and blooms.  So I think you responded better than I would have. I would have probably pointed out his faulty logic. 

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