Author Topic: s/o adults should know this - retrospectively obvious things you've just learned  (Read 104738 times)

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Jocelyn

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That's my hometown area! I fondly remember 4th of July BBQs where we were all wearing shorts, flip flips, and thick hoodies while watching snowflakes fall. the next day it was over 90 degrees  :P
Not anywhere near Hayden, by any chance?

afbluebelle

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About 100 miles... I grew up between Glenwood Springs and Grand Junction. We played Hayden in a lot of sports though, small schools had a lot of traveling to do  ;D
My inner (r-word) is having a field day with this one.
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Lynn2000

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Sour cream should not be stored in the freezer.

I don't know if I would call that retrospectively obvious. But definitely not a good idea.

If it makes you feel better, I found that out the hard way too

Frozen and thawed sour cream can still be used in cooked dishes - like beef stroganoff. I usually whip it up before tossing it into the pot. Still tasty and doesn't change the texture

I'm still using it. It is definitely no longer "creamy and smooth" however, as it says on the container. More like watery and grainy. It's also fat free, which might have some effect. It seemed like such a good idea at the time--at my store it only comes in very large containers and I bought it out of sync with when I wanted to use it, so I thought, "Hey, perishable thing, I will put you in the freezer until I need you!" ::)
~Lynn2000

Jones

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Sour cream should not be stored in the freezer.

I don't know if I would call that retrospectively obvious. But definitely not a good idea.

If it makes you feel better, I found that out the hard way too

Frozen and thawed sour cream can still be used in cooked dishes - like beef stroganoff. I usually whip it up before tossing it into the pot. Still tasty and doesn't change the texture

I'm still using it. It is definitely no longer "creamy and smooth" however, as it says on the container. More like watery and grainy. It's also fat free, which might have some effect. It seemed like such a good idea at the time--at my store it only comes in very large containers and I bought it out of sync with when I wanted to use it, so I thought, "Hey, perishable thing, I will put you in the freezer until I need you!" ::)
I freeze sour cream but it definitely needs a little fat in it, and is slated for being cooked into things.
Someday I will find where DH hides his recipe for sour cream cookies.

Elisabunny

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There was a speaker on the radio a few weeks ago talking about this subject. They worked in costume museums and explained that when you look inside lots of these small outfits the clothes had been cut down from a bigger costume, or they had lots of excess fabric inside so the original owner could sell the outfit later.

Nineteenth-century books often have the middle class characters talking about cutting down old clothes for someone else, or letting out seams or pleats for growth, or turning the fabric and resewing it in the latest style, which might require more fabric than a previous season's. 
You must remember this: a ghoti is still a fish...

VorFemme

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I remember a museum that was curating an outfit in a fabric older than the style it had been sewn into (18th century gown with 17th century fabric, if I recall the chapter in the costume book correctly) found needle holes for two more garments.  They too photos of the way it had been given them, them redid the sewing on one set of holes (least wear) to find a garment about fifty years older than the one that had been preserved for two hundred years....took more photos and took it back apart to recreate the original gown - which matched the dating of when the material would have been made....

And set it up in an exhibit showing how the original garment looked and what later generations did with expensive silk brocaded fabric to stay in style with the latest garment - without buying new fabrics, instead taking apart grandma's old gown to redo fifty years and then another fifty or sixty years later, grandma's gown made from her grandma's gown was remade for someone else.
Let sleeping dragons be.......morning breath......need I say more?

MariaE

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Sour cream should not be stored in the freezer.

I don't know if I would call that retrospectively obvious. But definitely not a good idea.

Neither should egg yolks.
 
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cicero

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I don't know if this was mentioned (possibly by me?) but it happened again today so i thought of this thread:

If you work in an office that has a fax machine, and someone tries to send you a fax but dials your landline by mistake and you get that annoying "beeeep beeeep" sound, just forward the call to the fax number (in our office i do this by pressing  "transfer" and then the three digits of the fax's extension, not the whole number).

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Jocelyn

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There was a speaker on the radio a few weeks ago talking about this subject. They worked in costume museums and explained that when you look inside lots of these small outfits the clothes had been cut down from a bigger costume, or they had lots of excess fabric inside so the original owner could sell the outfit later.

Nineteenth-century books often have the middle class characters talking about cutting down old clothes for someone else, or letting out seams or pleats for growth, or turning the fabric and resewing it in the latest style, which might require more fabric than a previous season's.
I have a WWII-era tailoring book that shows how to remake a dress. There's lots of tidbits like adding a bodice of another color, which would help some with making an out-grown dress over (the skirt portion being more likely to already have extra fabric). It was also intended to address the desire to have something new, in an era of fabric rationing. A dress might still have plenty of good wear in it, but remaking it and adding a bodice and sleeves of another color or a print would make it look like a new dress.