Author Topic: U.K. EHellions: What is "1 dessertspoon," and why are these called fondants?  (Read 707 times)

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TootsNYC

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I brought home a recipe book from the giveaway table at work; it's called "Fabulous Fondant Desserts" and is by Paul Simon, a Frenchchef. (There's a note on the copyright page that it was translated by Prudence Ivey and has an English language copy editor.

The publisher is listed as Simon & Schuster UK, and all the incredient stuff is in British terms (castor sugar), etc.

He calls for "1 dessertspoon plain flour"

What is that in American terms?
I've found references to it being 2 teaspoons (a metric "dessertspoon" is 10 milliliters).

But aren't U.K. teaspoons and U.S. teaspoons different?

How do I convert this?


Also, these fondants are essentially "a sponge"--they look just like cake. Why would they be called a fondant?

Here's a link to the book
http://www.amazon.com/Fabulous-Fondant-Desserts-Petits-Francais/dp/0857201085/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1309042437&sr=1-1

They have wonderfully oozy middles, but it seems they get that way by putting something oozy or melty in the middle before baking--unless the center doesn't bake up completely as well?

Anybody know anything about these desserts?


Hmmm. . . here's the note on Amazon.

Quote
Increasingly popular for home cooks due to being featured on baking reality television shows, fondant is a simple but delicious cream confection made of sugar, water, and other flavorings. Crème eggs, toffee, caramel, chocolate, lemon curd, and fruity preserves are all deliciously moist fillings for the mouthwatering fondant mini-puddings presented here. More than 30 recipes are included, some of which can be prepared in less than 10 minutes.

But why are they called fondants?

Bethalize

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He calls for "1 dessertspoon plain flour"

What is that in American terms?

It's two teaspoons. I don't sweat the conversion rounding myself.
Also, these fondants are essentially "a sponge"--they look just like cake. Why would they be called a fondant?

Fondant means melting in French.

Hth.

TootsNYC

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Well, nevermind, I looked a little more and found this:

http://www.ochef.com/1367.htm
Quote
A dessertspoon is an English measuring spoon, and you're right, it is equivalent to 10 milliliters. An American teaspoon is 5 ml, so your dessertspoon is equal to 2 American teaspoons. It takes a third teaspoon to equal the (15 ml) American tablespoon.

TootsNYC

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Also, these fondants are essentially "a sponge"--they look just like cake. Why would they be called a fondant?

Fondant means melting in French.

Hth.

That does h.

I didn't know that's what fondant meant! I edit recipes for a living (well, it's not the only thing I do, but I do it)--and I didn't know that! I don't know what I thought it did mean. "Candy," maybe.

thanks so very much!!