Author Topic: Using the stall for disabled people  (Read 39454 times)

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gmatoy

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Using the stall for disabled people
« on: July 11, 2011, 01:06:42 AM »
Today, I was at Costco. As I came out of the stall for disabled people, I was told by a woman who was at the sink area that "You don't have a disability! You shouldn't use that stall!"  I just looked at her and said, "What an interesting assumption."

She asked what I meant by that. I said, "You made an assumption about my health and I said it was an interesting one."

Next she asked me why I needed to use the stall and I told her that if she wasn't my doctor, I wasn't discussing my health with her.

Before E-hell I would have explained every bit of my reasons!

Larrabee

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Re: Using the stall for disabled people
« Reply #1 on: July 11, 2011, 04:47:05 AM »
Well done!  Excellent use of the e-hell technique there.   :)

rashea

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Re: Using the stall for disabled people
« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2011, 09:59:30 AM »
Perfect.  ;D
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Vermont

seriously?

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Re: Using the stall for disabled people
« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2011, 10:53:43 AM »
Good for you!

Nora

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Re: Using the stall for disabled people
« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2011, 10:57:46 AM »
That was perfect! So much better than I would have done.
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goldilocks

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Re: Using the stall for disabled people
« Reply #5 on: July 11, 2011, 10:58:56 AM »
I'm not convinced that using this stall is rude, if there is no one disable waiting for it.  I see no reason to leave this empty just in case a disabled person comes in.  It's not like a parking space, it should be free in a few minutes.

I frequently use the handicap stall just because I want the extra room, especialy if my grandaughter is with me.

NotTheNarcissist

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Re: Using the stall for disabled people
« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2011, 11:07:42 AM »
gmatoy, way to go! I applaud your convictions. Kudos!

hobish

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Re: Using the stall for disabled people
« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2011, 03:52:56 PM »

Nice! Go you!

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Fleur-de-Lis

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Re: Using the stall for disabled people
« Reply #8 on: July 11, 2011, 04:01:14 PM »
I'm not convinced that using this stall is rude, if there is no one disable waiting for it.  I see no reason to leave this empty just in case a disabled person comes in.  It's not like a parking space, it should be free in a few minutes.

I frequently use the handicap stall just because I want the extra room, especialy if my grandaughter is with me.

The only time that's a problem is when a parent decides she needs to use it to help her children change clothes after swimming.  :) 

I rarely opt for the handicapped stall, but given the gymnastics required to get into some stalls (where the door opens only in, and hits the toilet seat, and the "free" wall has the tissue dispenser in it) - I swear, architects hate women, and I sometimes loathe the profession - I sometimes will.  I've gone back and forth regarding whether I "should" use that stall since I don't "need" it, but I generally figure the line needs to be cleared out, too. 
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Mental Magpie

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Re: Using the stall for disabled people
« Reply #9 on: July 11, 2011, 05:17:06 PM »
I'm not convinced that using this stall is rude, if there is no one disable waiting for it.  I see no reason to leave this empty just in case a disabled person comes in.  It's not like a parking space, it should be free in a few minutes.

I frequently use the handicap stall just because I want the extra room, especialy if my grandaughter is with me.

The only time that's a problem is when a parent decides she needs to use it to help her children change clothes after swimming.  :) 

I rarely opt for the handicapped stall, but given the gymnastics required to get into some stalls (where the door opens only in, and hits the toilet seat, and the "free" wall has the tissue dispenser in it) - I swear, architects hate women, and I sometimes loathe the profession - I sometimes will.  I've gone back and forth regarding whether I "should" use that stall since I don't "need" it, but I generally figure the line needs to be cleared out, too.

If it's not in use and no one in line is specifically waiting for it, I think it should be used.  It is a toilet stall that has been modified to make it easier to fit a wheelchair into; that does not stop it from being a toilet stall.

Also, kudos to the OP!  You handled it very well.
The problem with choosing the lesser of two evils is that you're still choosing evil.

gmatoy

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Re: Using the stall for disabled people
« Reply #10 on: July 11, 2011, 07:47:37 PM »
OP here, blushing and thanking all of you for such kind words. (I too think that anyone can use them, that those who truly can not use the other stalls should be given perference.   Although, I always wait because I can wait.)

Darcy

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Re: Using the stall for disabled people
« Reply #11 on: July 12, 2011, 07:06:12 AM »
I'm not convinced that using this stall is rude, if there is no one disable waiting for it.  I see no reason to leave this empty just in case a disabled person comes in.  It's not like a parking space, it should be free in a few minutes.

I frequently use the handicap stall just because I want the extra room, especialy if my grandaughter is with me.

The only time that's a problem is when a parent decides she needs to use it to help her children change clothes after swimming.  :) 

I rarely opt for the handicapped stall, but given the gymnastics required to get into some stalls (where the door opens only in, and hits the toilet seat, and the "free" wall has the tissue dispenser in it) - I swear, architects hate women, and I sometimes loathe the profession - I sometimes will.  I've gone back and forth regarding whether I "should" use that stall since I don't "need" it, but I generally figure the line needs to be cleared out, too.

The (brand new!) building at our university has tiny stalls.  The toilet takes up half the length of the space and almost all the width, the toilet paper dispenser sticks out, and then they stuck in huge feminine product disposal boxes that are wedged between toilet and stall wall.  If you are sitting on the toilet (which is also small), you end up partially sitting on the box.

Yes, I use the handicap stall.

There are numerous other problems with this building, but it actually won an award for design. ::)

poundcake

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Re: Using the stall for disabled people
« Reply #12 on: July 12, 2011, 10:33:09 AM »
Those stalls are "accessible," not "exclusive." If no one else needs it, there's no reason why someone shouldn't use it. Or that whoever uses it doesn't need it in some way you can't immediately and visibly discern, as OP showed!

gingerzing

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Re: Using the stall for disabled people
« Reply #13 on: July 12, 2011, 03:21:34 PM »
I'm not convinced that using this stall is rude, if there is no one disable waiting for it.  I see no reason to leave this empty just in case a disabled person comes in.  It's not like a parking space, it should be free in a few minutes.

I frequently use the handicap stall just because I want the extra room, especialy if my grandaughter is with me.

The only time that's a problem is when a parent decides she needs to use it to help her children change clothes after swimming.  :) 

I rarely opt for the handicapped stall, but given the gymnastics required to get into some stalls (where the door opens only in, and hits the toilet seat, and the "free" wall has the tissue dispenser in it) - I swear, architects hate women, and I sometimes loathe the profession - I sometimes will.  I've gone back and forth regarding whether I "should" use that stall since I don't "need" it, but I generally figure the line needs to be cleared out, too.

The (brand new!) building at our university has tiny stalls.  The toilet takes up half the length of the space and almost all the width, the toilet paper dispenser sticks out, and then they stuck in huge feminine product disposal boxes that are wedged between toilet and stall wall.  If you are sitting on the toilet (which is also small), you end up partially sitting on the box.

Yes, I use the handicap stall.

There are numerous other problems with this building, but it actually won an award for design. ::)

Frank Lloyd Wright was considered an architect-genius, but yet was known to design houses without bathrooms or kitchens.   :-\    Yeah, I know.

I frequently use the disable accessible stalls.  Never had had a comment made about it.  Why do people feel the need to make such comments, I wonder.

Twik

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Re: Using the stall for disabled people
« Reply #14 on: July 13, 2011, 09:28:26 AM »
There are numerous other problems with this building, but it actually won an award for design. ::)

Tom Wolfe's From Bauhaus to Our House finally explained to me what architects are trying to do when they design buildings these days.

Hint: It's not creating a pleasant living space.
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