Author Topic: Using the stall for disabled people  (Read 40433 times)

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RubySlippers

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Re: Using the stall for disabled people
« Reply #15 on: July 13, 2011, 11:23:28 AM »
What would that woman say about someone walking up the wheelchair ramp instead of using the stairs?  is that exclusive in her mind as well?

Twik

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Re: Using the stall for disabled people
« Reply #16 on: July 13, 2011, 02:48:56 PM »
I think some people just overgeneralize things. They know you're not supposed to use handicapped parking spots, and think that the stalls operate on the same basis.
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Kimblee

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Re: Using the stall for disabled people
« Reply #17 on: July 13, 2011, 04:17:40 PM »
There are numerous other problems with this building, but it actually won an award for design. ::)

Tom Wolfe's From Bauhaus to Our House finally explained to me what architects are trying to do when they design buildings these days.

Hint: It's not creating a pleasant living space.

Oh now I'm interested... do tell.
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Mental Magpie

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Re: Using the stall for disabled people
« Reply #18 on: July 13, 2011, 04:18:34 PM »
I think some people just overgeneralize things. They know you're not supposed to use handicapped parking spots, and think that the stalls operate on the same basis.

I agree, Twik.  It's like those automatic door openers that open doors for handicapped people.  Honestly, I do get irritated when people use them, but not because they are meant for handicapped people only.  I get irritated because it is a waste of electricity (I don't care if it's at a mall).
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Twik

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Re: Using the stall for disabled people
« Reply #19 on: July 13, 2011, 04:45:18 PM »
There are numerous other problems with this building, but it actually won an award for design. ::)

Tom Wolfe's From Bauhaus to Our House finally explained to me what architects are trying to do when they design buildings these days.

Hint: It's not creating a pleasant living space.


Oh now I'm interested... do tell.

They are, essentially, creating modern art, not living spaces. So, people should be fitting themselves around the architecture, rather than the architecture fitting the people.

For example, he mentioned the architect who hated the look of buildings where different tenantsset their blinds at different levels. So, he designed an apartment block with built-in shades, so you could only have your blinds down, up, or exactly midway. If you wanted, say, 3/4 shade, too bad.

It's a cool book, and it'll have you chanting "OH WORKER HOUSING!" at a lot of late-20th century buildings.
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

princessleia

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Re: Using the stall for disabled people
« Reply #20 on: July 13, 2011, 05:46:41 PM »
I think some people just overgeneralize things. They know you're not supposed to use handicapped parking spots, and think that the stalls operate on the same basis.

I've read long debates about whether it's ok to use or not.  Personally, I try to avoid using the accessible stalls if other stalls are available, but I'm not going to judge anyone if they decide to use it.  However, if there is a line and the accessible stall opens up, I'm going to use it.  Obviously if I saw someone in line in a wheelchair or who said they needed the bigger stall, I would let them cut in front of me and use the accessible stall.  It doesn't matter whether I think they look like they need it or not.

Rohanna

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Re: Using the stall for disabled people
« Reply #21 on: July 13, 2011, 11:11:33 PM »
If they were exclusively handicap only they would be marked and policed like the spots are.

They are handicap accessible, just like many doors, hotel rooms, ramps, fairground rides, tables, bus seats, movie aisles, etc- which means that while they are designed with mobility issues in mind, they are not usually meant for the exclusive use of those they are accessible to. It's polite (and sometimes the posted rules) to allow those who "need" them to go ahead of you, or to offer their use immediately if someone who needs it approaches (ie bus seats)- but they are meant to be used by anyone.






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kareng57

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Re: Using the stall for disabled people
« Reply #22 on: July 13, 2011, 11:55:52 PM »
I think some people just overgeneralize things. They know you're not supposed to use handicapped parking spots, and think that the stalls operate on the same basis.

I've read long debates about whether it's ok to use or not.  Personally, I try to avoid using the accessible stalls if other stalls are available, but I'm not going to judge anyone if they decide to use it.  However, if there is a line and the accessible stall opens up, I'm going to use it.  Obviously if I saw someone in line in a wheelchair or who said they needed the bigger stall, I would let them cut in front of me and use the accessible stall.  It doesn't matter whether I think they look like they need it or not.


I'll admit that I'm always a bit perplexed whenever I'm in a long line in the ladies' room - say perhaps 5 stalls with an additional disabled-access stall - and everyone is leaving the disabled-access stall free at all times.  Why?  It's disabled-access, not disabled-only, and doing this is just creating a longer line for everyone else.

But I will admit that I am not brave enough to use it myself, if everyone else in the line seems to have this sort of mindset.

AngelicGamer

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Re: Using the stall for disabled people
« Reply #23 on: July 14, 2011, 12:26:40 AM »
I'm happy that some of the newer buildings in my area, along with some of the older building like my library, has two handicap stalls.  Seems to save a lot of mess and fuss.  :D

Small background - I use a red tipped cane.  /bg  The only time that I get told off about using the handicap stalls is when I have my cane folded up and in my purse holder.  Those people usually didn't see me tap my way to go in.  I do that so my dirty hands don't touch the handle until after I've washed my hands.  All I have to do is flash my cane and smile to get them to stop mid-sentence. 

OP - I think your answer was brilliant.  Plus, I agree with everyone else.  It is not just for the handicap to use, but everyone.  Also, if I see that the last stall is open and nobody using it, I usually encourage the person or two in front of me to use it.  It goes faster for everyone.  :)




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miss scarlet

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Re: Using the stall for disabled people
« Reply #24 on: August 03, 2011, 09:41:45 PM »
she asked me why I needed to use the stall and I told her that if she wasn't my doctor, I wasn't discussing my health with her.



WOW! the gall of this woman!

I once got yelled at by a stranger in a wheelchair when I used the handicapped stall (I was 9 months pregnant!) because pregnancy is apparently not a disability. I wish I knew about E-Hell then, but I did tell her she could go somewhere similar :-) Disability or not, we all have to wait in line to tinkle sometimes. 

Swish

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Re: Using the stall for disabled people
« Reply #25 on: August 03, 2011, 10:05:49 PM »
I don't look handicapped but I am. I have a handicap placard for my car, which I rarely use since I hate to park in a spot where older and more disabled people need them. I mainly got the placard for the car since some places here don't clear the snow and ice too quickly and that causes me problems because my knee is not that stable.

That said..... I don't feel that the handicapped stall is off limits at all. It's open for all to use, imo. I use it all the time because it is easier on my knee. I would never use it if I saw someone that obviously needed a lot more than me.

Alboury

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Re: Using the stall for disabled people
« Reply #26 on: August 26, 2011, 01:31:30 PM »
First, I wish to congratulate the OP for an excellent hold of the situation. Marvellous!

Then. Many people think that people not disabled should not use the handicap stalls or other devices meant for their ease. In fact, it's the other way around, especially in places where not many disabled people regularly go.

See, folks: as the word says, they are devices. And all devices need maintenance. It's impossible to tell if something's wrong with some device unless it functions improperly when somebody's trying to use it. And it's always better that the person to spot a malcondition is not in dire need of using the exact device right then - given, of course, that they will inform about their perception later. You sometimes see handicap toilets used partially as storage rooms or closets, in places where disabled folks are not regular guests. That can be avoided by simply using the toilet so that maintenance personnel will understand that it's used as a toilet and may not be switched into a temporary storage.

Shortly, a handicap stall is not a shrine to handicapped people. It's a place that exists so they can do their doings independently just like everybody else - sometimes, it can even mean queuing. That's life.
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Otterpop

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Re: Using the stall for disabled people
« Reply #27 on: August 28, 2011, 07:30:12 PM »
Well done OP!  You owe her no explanation.

I have a high functioning autistic daughter.  She used to have trouble with buttons and zippers.  Getting her to try on clothes for back to school was a nightmare.  I always used the handicapped stall to help her and once had to ask that a locked on be opened up for us.  The salesclerk protested that it was for handicapped people only.  I looked him square in the eye and said "Not all disabilities are visible."  He got it and got the keys.

General Jinjur

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Re: Using the stall for disabled people
« Reply #28 on: November 04, 2011, 09:08:26 PM »
They are, essentially, creating modern art, not living spaces. So, people should be fitting themselves around the architecture, rather than the architecture fitting the people.

For example, he mentioned the architect who hated the look of buildings where different tenantsset their blinds at different levels. So, he designed an apartment block with built-in shades, so you could only have your blinds down, up, or exactly midway. If you wanted, say, 3/4 shade, too bad.

It's a cool book, and it'll have you chanting "OH WORKER HOUSING!" at a lot of late-20th century buildings.

After subscribing to Dwell for a year, I am inclined to agree. A recent issue detailed a battle between a homeowner and the architect - the homeowner wanted screens so they could get a nice breeze, the architect said no way, they were ugly. They did work out a compromise, but - really? I am all for aesthetics, but if I'm the one who has to live there, I think my desires should take precedence.

As for the handicapped stall, it's OK to use under most circumstances. I do think it's polite to make one's use of it as quick as possible, just in case - no settling in with a magazine  :)

Yvaine

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Re: Using the stall for disabled people
« Reply #29 on: November 04, 2011, 09:16:01 PM »
I do think it's polite to make one's use of it as quick as possible, just in case - no settling in with a magazine  :)

Ha! Yes, this. I read some years back a rant about how people always used the disabled stall for their more...extended...stays in the bathroom, and realized to my embarrassment that I did this too! It was pretty subconscious and it took me a while to put my finger on why I did that, and I finally realized it was that it was a more comfortable and less claustrophobic place to be for a long stay. Once I figured it out, it became easier to break the habit for whatever reason.