Author Topic: The strangest, scariest, most dramatic thing that you've seen in your n'hood  (Read 90553 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

2littlemonkeys

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3552
Thought of another story.  Though nothing really happened, it could have been pretty bad.  This is before we had our big gate.  These days a person isn't even going to be able to get into our yard unless we buzz them in.

One night, someone rang the doorbell.  We live in a 2 flat and have an inner door that goes to our apartment, a tiny vestibule and then the outer door.  I just happened to be getting the mail from the vestibule and saw a man on our porch.  We essentially had this conversation (paraphrased, as it was a few years ago.)  At no time did I open the door, we were speaking through the small window in the (thick, heavy, deadbolted) door.

Me: can I help you?
Strange guy: Hi, I need to use your phone.
Me: Is there someone I can call for you?
SG: I need to use your phone.  Let me in.

Then he spun this story about how he lost his keys and can't get into his house.  At one point, he showed me his (empty) wallet (for why?).  The whole time, he's pretty much demanding I let him in so he can use my phone to call his wife.

I asked him to just give me her number and I'd be happy to call her for him.  (And at this point, if he were legitimately locked out of his house, he should have been fine with this.)

He flipped out on me, telling me I was being un-neighborly, he lived two doors down and really needed to get in touch with his wife.  When he gave me his address, I knew he was lying.  I know the people who live in that house and he is not one of them.  So I told him he wasn't going to be let into my house.  If he needed me to call someone, I'd be more than happy to do that.  Otherwise, he needed to leave my property or I was calling the police.  He yelled a couple more things and then left. 

I called the cops anyway to report his weird behavior, I felt like he was trying to sweet talk and then bully his way into my house.  A few days later, I spoke with another neighbor and she told me a man matching his description tried to do the same thing the day before he came to my house. (She called the cops too.)  So he was obviously up to something.  I don't know what ever happened with him.  I hope no one ever let him in.


Ms_Cellany

  • The Queen of Squee
  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 5679
  • Big white goggie? No. Hasn't seen him.
I'd moved into a new house with my Neapolitan mastiff, Hoover.

Details that will be important later:
The house had glass doors to the backyard.
Hoover was a dark blue/gray, making him hard to see in shadows.
He was also incredibly well-socialized and loved everybody in the world.

So I was mowing the front yard and had taken the grasscatcher to the back yard to empty it into the compost heap, leaving the mower out front. After I finished, I turned to see a drunk guy in the back yard with me.

Him: (slurry) Ishee you rmowin yryard. I'llfinish itforyou fr fife dollars.
Me: No, thanks, I've got it.
Him: Naw, izokay. Howbout threedollars?
Me: No, thanks, I've got it.

This kept on. I wasn't scared, but he wasn't leaving, either. So I kept talking and started moving toward the back door. As my hand got near the doorknob, he finally focused *through* the glass, where he saw Hoover's inch-long fangs bared in full snarl.  With his coloring, teeth were probably the ONLY thing the guy could see.

He said: "Nizedog!"  And left.
Current fosters: Boojum (F, adult); Zuul (F); Magpie (M); Balrog (M); Nazgul (F)

Elfmama

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 5983
The childhood neighborhood stories reminded me of this one.

The ballet teacher in our very small town lived 4 doors down from us.  She was arrested and convicted of growing pot in her backyard garden.  Gossip fodder for MONTHS for the grownups!

Across the alley lived the ballet teacher's best friend.  Best Friend and her hubby walked past that pot-patch dozens of times without ever realizing what it was, which lead to Hubby getting an official reprimand from his boss -- the Chief of Police!
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
It's true. Money can't buy happiness.  You have to turn it
into books first.
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

Ligeia

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 328
Ours is sweeter than pie to the family, but downright dangerous to anyone who even looks at her people/yard/goats funny. (And the nieghbors... the ones that barely know her name? Yeah, those belong to her too.)

Oh, and they seem to need teritory. Ours one day decided the neighbor's kids belonged to her, and when a diffrent neighbor's vicious dog came into the yard and started growling and snapping at the running five year old she...

Well, the other dog didn't make it, and in fact I wouldn;t have even guessed it was a dog by the remains.  :-\

Oddly, this is the same dog that allows the neighbor kids to use her as a bench and helps clean baby goats so gently that she doesn't even make them sway.

Whoa. I love dogs, big dogs especially, but she's kept restrained somehow, right?  That story scares me a bit for some reason.  It's great if she saved the neighbor's kid from a vicious dog, but at the same time, if she's dangerous to people who just look askance at you . . .

I have a big dog (probably much smaller than yours!) who has a bit of an attitude problem.  He's never bitten anyone or even tried, but he barks and growls at strangers. His bark is literally worse than his nonexistent bite, but I keep him away from most others, since I don't want the liability if he does try something with someone (and I don't want to lose him, of course).  And it occurs to me that my growly dog wouldn't stand a chance near yours--she'd probably have a real problem with his bad attitude!

Did you have any fallout from the neighbors who lost their dog?

The neighbors that lost their dog threw a fit, but when we threatened to turn them in for letting their dog on our property they backed down. None of our other neighbors mind her, although one called us to complain that she had gotten out (back when the fence was shorter) and was licking his sheep, and could we come get her please? But that was a long time ago.

And yeah, she has a very tall fence to keep her in now. Honestly, she has only actually attacked one person, and that person was beating my brother up and threatening me. She HAS "restrained" people who jumped our fence to steal goats though, and once lept the fence to chase someone down who had grabbed my duck. But she didn't hurt him, she just knocked him down and growled until Dad called her back. She's not much of a biter, but she's pretty intimidating.


That sounds like a great dog!  I guess I just jumped on the word "dangerous."  I have no problem with dogs protecting their property or humans.  I'm pretty sure even my growly-but-cowardly dog would attack someone who was attacking me or my husband.

Hillia

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3856
This is my uncle's story, but I'm going to tell it because he's not here.

Uncle was a cop in a small town.  He was friends with a family up the street: Big Jim, the dad; his wife; Young Jim the son (aged about 18 when the story takes place); and 2 or 3 younger kids.

Easter Sunday, Uncle is eating dinner with his family when the phone rings.  It's one of the younger kids, screaming, 'Come quick!  He's killing him!'.  Uncle calls for backup, grabs his gun and goes up to the house, where he finds Big Jim lying dead on the front lawn with something like 11 stab wounds in the face, neck, and chest.
After determining that Big Jim is dead, he goes in the house to see what happened, and eventually finds Young Jim hiding upstairs under his bed. 

Apparently, Young Jim was carving the Easter roast, and his father said something like 'You're cutting it too thick'.  So Young Jim stabbed his father 11 times with the carving knife.  But Big Jim got the knife away from him and chased Young Jim outside - that's why Uncle found him on the front lawn, he was trying to get at Young Jim to punish him for having the gall to attack his father.  Young Jim wasn't hiding from the police, he was hiding from his father.  Big Jim was known for having a wicked temper and there were rumors that he was abusive to his wife and/or kids.

            Created by MyFitnessPal.com - Free Weight Loss Tools

Doll Fiend

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 986
  • The Dolls are in the Garden and in my Head.
You know, at first I just thought of police/emergency-related stuff, but I guess this would qualify for this thread, too.

I live in Buffalo, NY. I've seen a lot of snow. But the October snowstorm of 2006 was something I will never forget for the rest of my life.

When it started coming down, I thought, "Wow! That's early even for here!" And it got worse. And worse. Tree branches ... still covered in leaves ... were getting covered with this wet, sodden snow. Then we started hearing the "crack" overhead. The power went out. We huddled in bed with our toddler, listening to the trees crackle overhead (and the occasional "thud" of falling branches ... and trees).

The power didn't come back on for eight days.

The scene when we got up in the morning was ... surreal. Trees and branches were down everywhere. Our road was completely blocked. Everything was coated with this heavy, frosting-like snow. People were just out wandering in amazement. And was so quiet ...

I'll try posting some pix later.

Still reading through the thread but boy, I remember that! And I live in Omaha, NE But it still happened. Due to all the trees being down and such we couldn't get out of our neighbor hood unless we walked or took my neighbors snowmobiles. He did a lot of emergency grocery shopping for our neighborhood. We of course paid for gas and the groceries.

JadeAngel

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 962
I remembered another one.

I was working on a Saturday, just finishing up some paperwork and I'm sitting at the reception desk which commands a view of the street and also the outdoor courtyard which leads to the carpark.

So I heard the gate creak and look up in time to see a complete stranger walk past the glass door and head for the carpark. Mindful that we've had a few break ins I grab my phone and am about to investigate when he walks back again carrying a 6 foot aluminum ladder he's taken from the carpark. I hurry outside and confront him as he's about to put the ladder into his van.

Me: excuse me, what are you doing?
Him: Oh um, yeah, I need a ladder.
Me: I'm sorry I can't let you just take the ladder
Him: I only need it for an hour or so, I'll bring it right back
Me: No. Put it back where you found it please

He put it back and I locked both gates and all the doors. It's wasn't until he was driving off that I pinged that the license plates of his car, both front and back had been covered with black plastic and duct tape.

A week or so later the pub on the corner had to be evacuated when someone put pepper spray through the airconditioning system on the roof. I'm still not convinced that the two events were unrelated.

SDG31000

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 155
Around the time of the London Bombings I got a phone call from my sister to tell me to turn on the TV.  I live in Leicester, which has a huge Indian population, and it seems that some terrorist suspects were being held in the police station just around the corner from our house.  My DS had to keep my DM from watching the news as she would have been convinced we were all going to get blown up.

The houses next door are arranged in a block of three with parking for the cars between my house and them.  Neighbour in the house closest to ours just vanishes one day, all the dishes are left in the sink, nothing seems to be taken.  He just doesn't come home and no one comes to empty the house either.  Then we get woken up one New Year's Day at around 7am by this huge bang that shock the house.  I rush out of bed to check on DS1 and DS2 and then outside to see what has happened.  The car that belongs to the next door but one neighbours has blown up, but it's not a fire based explosion.  All the windows have blown out and the roof of the car has been forced upwards.  The Fire Bridge and Police have no idea what has happened, as there is no sign of any tampering, all the car doors are still locked, there is no fire and nothing out of the ordinary around it or in it.  The best theory is that the next door neighbour that vanished had someone angry with him and that they had done it as a warning/revenge.
Other than that we live in a quiet neighbourhood.

Bijou

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 12917
I grew up in a small town where there is a fishing community and we were a part of that.  I remember seeing a boat go on the rocks coming into port.  it was a horrible helpless feeling.  I was a kid then, but remember it.   
I remember another incident from my childhood when my Dad's and uncle's boat went on the rocks in the middle of one foggy night.  My uncle, who was skippering at that time (they shared it, alternating seasons) climbed up a sheer vertical cliff and sat clinging to a ledge above the ocean all night, finishing the climb at daybreak.  When they came by the next morning to tell us, his fingernails were all chewed up from the climb. 
« Last Edit: August 05, 2011, 10:52:14 AM by Bijou »
I've never knitted anything I could recognize when it was finished.  Actually, I've never finished anything, much to my family's relief.

Corbin

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2287
This is big and dramatic and 100% true.

When I was little we lived in the little tiny rental house next door to a massive three story house. It was my mom, my sister (7), my brother (1) and me (8 years). Anyway, one morning mom came in to wake us up, but told us that we wouldn't be going to school. We were going to have an "indoor, at home, fun day!" She moved the television into our bedroom, which was connected to my brothers bedroom via the bathroom, and told us we were going to stay in just those three rooms all day. No school, no chores, just hanging out and having fun. I noticed, when she was telling us all of this, that there was a police officer in the living room. She said he just needed a place to sit, and some privacy, so we were going to leave him alone.

Needless to say, this was very odd, and I was not fooled. Something was up. When I tried to ask questions, though, I got "The Look", which my mother is exceptionally good at, so I stopped asking.

When we said we were hungry, mom stuck her head out of our room and said something to the officer, who brought us ice cream and girl scout cookies out of the kitchen. Now this was a breakfast a kid could get excited about! But it was really out of character for mom to allow something like this, and it was all really strange.

Finally, details started to emerge. Our neighbor had gotten up on top of his three-story house and started shooting at everything that moved. Since there was a clear line of sight from his roof into our living room, mom's bedroom, and the kitchen, we were being kept out of there, and the officer was stationed in there because, well, line of sight works both ways. Somehow my mom managed to convey some of this info in such a way that we didn't panic. She is awesome like that.

Around lunch time, the officers decided that it was too dangerous to make a move against our neighbor while we were in the house. They parked an unmarked car at the corner, which was just across an empty lot from our house. They took us into the bathroom, and handed my baby brother out the window to a SWAT guy in a bullet proof vest. Then my sister and I went out the window, then my mom. The SWAT guy told us to duck close to the ground, follow him, and not look back, no matter what we might hear. My mom came last (a photo taken as we ran to the car made the paper...my mother did not duck. In fact she appears to be running on her toes. She said she figured that if she was the easiest target, her kids would be more likely to make it to the car safely...like I said, she is awesome, and really brave).

We made it to the car safe and sound, the car drove off and took us to the police department, and when we were safely inside the PD, sitting on comfy chairs, my mother (previously the very image of calm) started shaking and sobbing. We thought this was all very strange, and wandered off to watch television with a very nice social worker.

They used large amounts of tear gas to get him out of the house. No one was killed, or even injured. Evidently he was not a very good shot. I know he spent a good long time in prison. We were contacted while I was in Basic Training, and informed that he was being released. By then we were living in another state, so it didn't much seem to matter. While I have very vivid memories of the whole thing, I don't remember ever being frightend. I figure that is because my mom was so calm that we never thought there was a reason to worry. By the time she seemed scared, we were with the police, so we didn't see any reason to be scared.

My mom will always be my "parenting guide". She has told me, many times, that a parent can make a traumatic crisis seem like nothing at all, simply by how the kids see them react. They can also make a minor incident terribly traumatic, again, simply by the way they react. I also discovered that, in combat, a leader can have the same effect on their troops. She is my hero, for so many reasons!

Edited for small grammatical errors, because I hate those!
« Last Edit: August 05, 2011, 10:48:21 AM by Corbin »
"If someone else posted this, I would be convinced they were making it up..."

Piratelvr1121

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 10804
Wow Corbin your mom really is brave and many kinds of awesome! :)
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

Seraphia

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1738
  • Unabashed cat person
Holy cow Corbin! I wanna be your mom when I grow up.
Ancora Imparo - I am still learning

Corbin

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2287
Holy cow Corbin! I wanna be your mom when I grow up.
Me too! I try. She says I am better than she was, but I am not sure she realizes the level of awesomeness that she has achieved!
"If someone else posted this, I would be convinced they were making it up..."

shadowfox79

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2845
Our next-door neighbours like to have screaming arguments with their extended family in the street, which on one occasion led to someone getting their car and ramming the neighbour's car right in the rear bumper, to much screaming from the onlookers. On another occasion we overheard the male half of the couple drunkenly yelling to the police officer on his doorstep that it was his TV and his kitchen window, and if he wanted to throw one through the other it was his business.  ::) The following morning we were woken by the sound of a broken TV being hurled through the chipboard covering his broken kitchen window.

Other than that, we apparently live in a quiet neighbourhood. We've been broken into ourselves, but I was fortunate enough to come downstairs after they'd long gone.

The only other event I can remember was the tornado that came down the street. I was at work, but DH saw it. Luckily it was a comparatively small one, so all it did was uproot a few trees and rip a roof off one of the neighbouring houses.

Bijou

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 12917
This is big and dramatic and 100% true.

When I was little we lived in the little tiny rental house next door to a massive three story house. It was my mom, my sister (7), my brother (1) and me (8 years). Anyway, one morning mom came in to wake us up, but told us that we wouldn't be going to school. We were going to have an "indoor, at home, fun day!" She moved the television into our bedroom, which was connected to my brothers bedroom via the bathroom, and told us we were going to stay in just those three rooms all day. No school, no chores, just hanging out and having fun. I noticed, when she was telling us all of this, that there was a police officer in the living room. She said he just needed a place to sit, and some privacy, so we were going to leave him alone.

Needless to say, this was very odd, and I was not fooled. Something was up. When I tried to ask questions, though, I got "The Look", which my mother is exceptionally good at, so I stopped asking.

When we said we were hungry, mom stuck her head out of our room and said something to the officer, who brought us ice cream and girl scout cookies out of the kitchen. Now this was a breakfast a kid could get excited about! But it was really out of character for mom to allow something like this, and it was all really strange.

Finally, details started to emerge. Our neighbor had gotten up on top of his three-story house and started shooting at everything that moved. Since there was a clear line of sight from his roof into our living room, mom's bedroom, and the kitchen, we were being kept out of there, and the officer was stationed in there because, well, line of sight works both ways. Somehow my mom managed to convey some of this info in such a way that we didn't panic. She is awesome like that.

Around lunch time, the officers decided that it was too dangerous to make a move against our neighbor while we were in the house. They parked an unmarked car at the corner, which was just across an empty lot from our house. They took us into the bathroom, and handed my baby brother out the window to a SWAT guy in a bullet proof vest. Then my sister and I went out the window, then my mom. The SWAT guy told us to duck close to the ground, follow him, and not look back, no matter what we might hear. My mom came last (a photo taken as we ran to the car made the paper...my mother did not duck. In fact she appears to be running on her toes. She said she figured that if she was the easiest target, her kids would be more likely to make it to the car safely...like I said, she is awesome, and really brave).

We made it to the car safe and sound, the car drove off and took us to the police department, and when we were safely inside the PD, sitting on comfy chairs, my mother (previously the very image of calm) started shaking and sobbing. We thought this was all very strange, and wandered off to watch television with a very nice social worker.

They used large amounts of tear gas to get him out of the house. No one was killed, or even injured. Evidently he was not a very good shot. I know he spent a good long time in prison. We were contacted while I was in Basic Training, and informed that he was being released. By then we were living in another state, so it didn't much seem to matter. While I have very vivid memories of the whole thing, I don't remember ever being frightend. I figure that is because my mom was so calm that we never thought there was a reason to worry. By the time she seemed scared, we were with the police, so we didn't see any reason to be scared.

My mom will always be my "parenting guide". She has told me, many times, that a parent can make a traumatic crisis seem like nothing at all, simply by how the kids see them react. They can also make a minor incident terribly traumatic, again, simply by the way they react. I also discovered that, in combat, a leader can have the same effect on their troops. She is my hero, for so many reasons!

Edited for small grammatical errors, because I hate those!
Your mom is motherhood personified.
I've never knitted anything I could recognize when it was finished.  Actually, I've never finished anything, much to my family's relief.